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IndyCar - Motegi race


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#151 ZOOOM

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 18:00

Front page news at the Chicago Tribune today, with three more stories about her in the sports section. USA Today had a front page sports section on her win. Many, Many other USA newspapers featured her win. This is the biggest Auto Racing news in the last several years!

And Oh... by the way, some bloke won a race for the taxicabs last Sunday too.........

Zooom

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#152 john glenn printz

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 12:12

HISTORIC FIRST. Danica Patrick's win at the Motegi 300 (April 20, 2008) is a first victory for a female in major league thoroughbred open wheel motor racing 1894 to 2008, i.e. including the Grand Prix, Indy Car Racing, AAA (1902-1955), USAC (1956-1979), CART (1979-2004), or ChampCar (2005-2008), etc.

My first year of following major international motorsport was 1953. The AAA, who then controlled all major automobile racing in the U.S., would not even then allow women in the pits, garage area, or the press room. The AAA Contest Board (1909-1955) made only one exception that I know of, i.e. Amelia Earhart, who was the Honorary Referee, at Indianapolis in 1935.

Grand Prix racing goes back to 1906, the U.S. National Driving Title to 1916. Before that you had such races as the Gordon Bennett Cup (1900-1905), the Vanderbilt Cup (1904-1916), and the American Grand Prize (1908-1916). Automobile racing began in France with their great "Town to Town" events (1894-1903). The Indianapolis 500 started in 1911.

I do not consider "Drag racing", which is a 1/4 mile acceleration test, to be major main line automobile racing. To be a major race it must have a distance of 100 mile or more, with at least a dozen competitors. Check the record books and you will find no women winners, anywhere, in the major contests.

In the entire 113 year old history of major contest automobile racing Patrick has the first victory ever for a female in this type of important open wheel competition. It is a great breakthrough and a great achievement on her part.

John Glenn Printz, racing historian

#153 McGuire

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 12:55

Originally posted by john glenn printz
My first year of following major international motorsport was 1953. The AAA, who then controlled all major automobile racing in the U.S., would not even then allow women in the pits, garage area, or the press room. The AAA Contest Board (1909-1955) made only one exception that I know of, i.e. Amelia Earhart, who was the Honorary Referee, at Indianapolis in 1935.


Great story about Denise McCluggage, the pioneering female racer and sportswriter... when she was finally allowed into Gasoline Alley at Indy, as she was being escorted through the gate she turned on a track official and said, "Who the f**k are you calling a lady, pal?"

#154 McGuire

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 13:00

Originally posted by john glenn printz

I do not consider "Drag racing", which is a 1/4 mile acceleration test, to be major main line automobile racing.


Well I do, and I say Shirley Muldowney was a genuine pioneer and a hell of a racer.

#155 aportinga

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 15:28

Originally posted by canon1753
How'd you like those apples?

Sure it was a fuel economy win, but it pays points, and its in the record book. Good for her.

(For the conspiracy theory people- this would be the last race you'd want her to get the call and win... No US audience)


Oh bullshit! No one cares about the actual race because no one saw it in the States - that's preciecly why it's a perfect race to win. The ONLY thing people in the States will see is a WIN.

Anyone care to discuss this comment from Helio - who was in the lead...

"I actually didn't know she was in the lead and the guys in the pits said let her by and I just realized on the next lap when I saw my number in like second and I said wait a minute... but it was good because if I tried to hold her off I would be out of fuel, we didn't have enough fuel." ~ Helio



I am not saying it was fixed or not.... Just thought this was interesting because of the timing (perfect race), the fact that the IRL probably did not want Long Beach to take on more press then the IRL race (nor would Honda), and now you have Penske calling Helio a race win?

It is what it is I guess.





#156 jonpollak

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 16:00

Originally posted by aportinga


Oh bullshit! No one cares about the actual race because no one saw it in the States ...

the fact that the IRL probably did not want Long Beach to take on more press then the IRL race (nor would Honda),


Andy...where you gettin your info?
First of all I can guarantee you that not only did the States see it all, Europe and most of South America saw it as well.
it was repeated 3 times here in Engerland....

As for Champ Car nobody saw it live...We in Europe got nothing, not even a 10 second blurt on any sports channel.
Don't know about broadcasts outside those two markets but I doubt any station bothered...and if they did I never heard about it.

It was a non event...So it was never going to surpass the Japanese Race...Danica or not
Jp

#157 CWeil

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 16:32

Originally posted by aportinga


Oh bullshit! No one cares about the actual race because no one saw it in the States - that's preciecly why it's a perfect race to win. The ONLY thing people in the States will see is a WIN.

Anyone care to discuss this comment from Helio - who was in the lead...



I am not saying it was fixed or not.... Just thought this was interesting because of the timing (perfect race), the fact that the IRL probably did not want Long Beach to take on more press then the IRL race (nor would Honda), and now you have Penske calling Helio a race win?

It is what it is I guess.


Don't be an idiot- read the second half of the quote from Helio.

#158 aportinga

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 17:09

Originally posted by jonpollak


Andy...where you gettin your info?
First of all I can guarantee you that not only did the States see it all, Europe and most of South America saw it as well.
it was repeated 3 times here in Engerland....

As for Champ Car nobody saw it live...We in Europe got nothing, not even a 10 second blurt on any sports channel.
Don't know about broadcasts outside those two markets but I doubt any station bothered...and if they did I never heard about it.

It was a non event...So it was never going to surpass the Japanese Race...Danica or not
Jp


No no no.... No one was going to WATCH because no one (in any real numbers) cares about either races... At least on TV. The IRL was on TV but rain delay - "partner" issues and so on screwed up the schedule... They are actually bumped off the air on ESPN2 for Billiards no less - if that doesn't tell you no one cares then I have no idea what would. Plus the rating last year for Japan was a 0.0.

It's not accesibility to the race - it's a veiwer choice I am talking about.

Regarding your second comment... Of the very few in the States all would have tuned into Wind Tunnel and that other Speed show on Sunday - I'll add ESPN as well, I would think the big story for the IRL would have rather been a victory in Japan (which would even go beyond these piss ass channels to more national levels), then the last ChampCar race at Long Beach.

BTW - had Danica not won I would argue that Motegi would have surpassed Long Beach. But again - no one cares anyhow except for us innerweb folks.

#159 aportinga

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 17:14

Originally posted by CWeil


Don't be an idiot- read the second half of the quote from Helio.


I read it just fine... I am not saying there was something up or not. Just saying that it's bullshit to assume that this would not be an opportunity.

If you have a problem with that then I don't know what to tell you.



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#160 CWeil

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 17:37

I guess anyone will find a conspiracy in anything if they pull the wool up far enough. I just amazed they'd bother to.

I have this inkling that you wouldn't have said the same if it had been Hideki Mutoh, for example.

#161 jonpollak

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 18:07

Originally posted by aportinga
No no no....


Whatda ya mean.. No No No
Who are you Amy Winehouse?

Dunno what you are talking about...
I watched the ESPN2 re air of Motegi on the web @ www.justin.tv/allsports and saw the whole thing...no billiards?
Then went to the pub to see all the locals lathered up over the brunette winning a car race on Sky Sports...It was big news.
Big enough to keep the "Championship" (first division) Stoke/BristolC soccer match off the main screen.




Anyway...enough of this Duck Season/Rabbit Season
READ THE MAN WHO KNOWS WHAT'S UP...
http://auto-racing.s...-wheel-notebook

Jp

#162 aportinga

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 19:42

I had Motegi listed on ESPN2 (Dish Network). It was bumped by billiards here in the States and then pushed off to ESPN Classic - which from what I read on the ICS boards, Comcast doesn't even carry for a good deal of veiwers if at all.

#163 Dudley

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 20:06

Originally posted by CWeil
I guess anyone will find a conspiracy in anything if they pull the wool up far enough. I just amazed they'd bother to.

I have this inkling that you wouldn't have said the same if it had been Hideki Mutoh, for example.


Then again, Hideki is a proven race winner in lower formulae. Ms Patrick has never won a professional race of any type other than this one.

#164 CWeil

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 21:56

It was a reference to the location/timing more so than pedigree.

#165 Dudley

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 09:35

True, but it would still be considerably less of a surprise that Mutoh can win motor races.

#166 john glenn printz

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 12:28

DESIRE WILSON: CLARIFICATION, CONFUSION, AND CONTROVERSY. In the light of Danica's Patrick's most recent win at Motegi, Japan on April 20, 2008, it is being asserted by some that Patrick's victory is not the first major win in open wheel automobile racing by a woman, but rather a victory in 1980 by Desire Wilson (b. 1953) in a Formula One event at Brands Hatch, England, claims that real honor. It all depends I guess on what one regards as major or minor; but I would classify the forementioned Brand Hatch race in the minor category.

In 1980 the two most elite and premier open wheel racing circuits were (1.) the FIA Formula 1 Grand Prix events, of which there were 14 in 1980, which contributed points towards the World Driving Title and (2.) the CART Championship or the U.S. style open wheel format, which crowned the America Indy Car, U.S. National Driving Title, or the PPG Indy Car World Series winner. The CART series had 12 races, although the Indianapolis 500 itself was still a USAC sanctioned event.

These 26 races total, were the most important, prestigious, elite, and major open wheel contests for the year 1980. Everything else would have to be deemed minor.

In fact, Desire Wilson had no starts whatever in genuine FIA Grand Prixs counting for the World Driving Title. Zero. In three tries at Indianapolis (i.e. 1982, 1983, and 1984) Wilson failed to qualify and never ran in any 500 milers at Indianapolis. Desire did run in eleven genuine CART races, 1983 to 1986, but her best finished was 10th at Cleveland on 3 July 1983.

Only two women, both Italians, have actually raced in the legitimate point giving Grand Prix events, i.e. Maria Teresa de Filippis (b. 1926) and Lella Lombardi (1943-1992). De Filippis ran in three during 1958-1959, and Lombardi in twelve during 1975-76. Lella is the only woman to have gained any actual points, i.e. a 1/2 point she earned for placing 6th at the Spanish Grand Prix run on 27 April 1975.

It is generally conceded that the Czech Eliska "Elizabeth" Junkova (1900-1994) was the best and greatest woman racing driver before World War II.

Certainly the U.S. National Driving Title series, begun in 1916, whether AAA, USAC, CART, IRL, etc., has always been the highest form of motorsport in the U.S., just as the more important FIA point giving Grand Prix contests are the major open wheel races in Europe and around the world. Wilson did not win anything in either of these two, long existent, series.

Lyn St. James (b. 1947) had seven Indianapolis 500 starts, her best finishing placement being 11th in her rookie years of 1992. In a total of 16 Indy car contests, 1992 to 2000, her best finish was 8th at Orlando, FL in a 200 mile race staged on January 27, 1996.

Of the five gals that have actually run in the Indianapolis 500, their best finishing results are, (1.) Patrick 4th (2005), (2.) Guthrie 9th (1978), (3.) St. James 11th (1992), (4.) Fisher 18th (2007), and (5.) Milka Duno 31st (2007).

Miscellanea. Arlene Hiss, then the wife of driver Mike Hiss, was the first lady to compete in a genuine Championship level Indy Car event on March 3, 1976 at Phoenix, AZ. Janet Guthrie's (b. 1938) best finish in eleven Indy Car starts was 5th at the USAC Milwaukee 200 on August 12, 1979. This was not bettered until Sarah Fisher (b. 1980) took a 3rd at the Kentucky 300 on August 27, 2000. Here Fisher also led circuits 162-170, to become the first woman ever, to lead laps in an Indy Car contest. In 2001 Sarah placed 2nd at Homestead-Miami, FL , in a 300 miler, on April 8. This was the highest finish for any woman in major open wheel automobile racing, until Patrick equaled it at Detroit (Belle Isle) on September 2, 2007.

Patrick is the only woman to have led the Indianapolis 500 and has a total of 19 circuits in front, all in the 2005 race, i.e. laps 56, 172-185, and 190-193. The great Dan Gurney (b. 1931), in his nine 500 starts, led a grand total of just 2, all in 1967!

At the Louisville 300 (11 Aug. 2002) Sarah Fisher captured the pole position by posting the fastest qualifying speed (221.390 mph), another first for female drivers.