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Drivers Getting Heated up Over Tyre Blanket Ban


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#101 Risil

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 10:37

Originally posted by StefanV
What is the difference between a Japanese driver and a driver from another country? I do not understand this discussion at all. You are saying that "because there have been no really good Japanese F1 driver, Japanese drivers are bad"?


The Japanese have been somewhat over-represented in F1, though, owing to the presence of now-two auto manufacturers on the grid. Nakajima and Sato were clearly not as good as the 1987 Lotus and 2004 BAR respectively, and yet their presence prevented more capable drivers from establishing themselves in F1. But there have been far, far worse paydrivers in F1 than Nakajima Snr and Sato, so IMO it's a relatively small issue. And Kazuki Nakajima will prove his talent yet.;)

Originally posted by StefanV

What about drivers from Uruguay? Surely they should not be in F1?


Gonzalo Rodriguez was pretty quick.

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#102 Atreiu

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 13:14

Originally posted by Andrew, Ford &F1


An overtake at Spa would make a highlight of the season. And by the way, remember that some years ago people used to race like that. Remember Lauda, Stewart, Fittipaldi, Clark, Peterson. And they did so in cars that were millions of times more dangerous than the ones of today and on the venues where if one had a huge crash no ambulance would be available and the one that eventually reached the site of the crash got lost on the way to the hospital. That's why the older generation of race fans cherish the memories of the races from the eighties, seventies and sixties (as well as fifties) so much. That's beacause they saw HEROES in action.


That kind of heroic deeds killed Villleneuve and retired Pironi, to mention only two. Those crashes were very much caused by having a car much faster than another on the same track at the same time, which is what many of you seem aching to see again in the name of some randomness and the oh so great skilled demanded to race on stone cold tyres.

#103 Andrew Ford &F1

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 20:21

Originally posted by Atreiu


That kind of heroic deeds killed Villleneuve and retired Pironi, to mention only two. Those crashes were very much caused by having a car much faster than another on the same track at the same time, which is what many of you seem aching to see again in the name of some randomness and the oh so great skilled demanded to race on stone cold tyres.


Gilles Villeneuve was a very aggressive driver. I read somewhere (probably in a book by Donaldson that deep inside some people always expected him to crash someday and were worried about that). And both crashes happened in practice. Plus, one should not compare the cars and venues of today with the ones that were some 20-30 years ago. Contemporary drivers are privilidged to race in much safer equipment.