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#1 arthurive

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 19:45

Now that Robert Kubica has his 1st win, I thougt it timely to provide a list of drivers that won
one and only one race in their F1 career: (Indianapolis 1950-1960 not included, by my choice)
By country/nationality:
Brazil - Carlos Pace
France - Jean Alesi
Francois Cevert
JP Beltoise
Olivier Panis
GB - Jenson Button
Innes Ireland
Peter Gethin
Germany- Jochen Mass
Italy - Jarno Trulli
Alessandro Nannini
Lorenzo Bandini
Piero Taruffi
Ludovico Scarfiotti
Vittorio Brambilla
Giancarlo Baghetti
Luigi Musso*
Luigi Fagioli*
Sweden - Joakim Bonnier
Gunnar Nilsson
USA - Richie Ginther

* Shared wins
We don't want M. Kubica to join this club, he likley won't.

Why so many Italians :rolleyes:
My guys can never get a break, even in history.......

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#2 John B

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 19:53

Without knowing the details of the historical drivers I'd guess RK is probably the youngest, or close to the youngest of the group (Alesi, Trulli, Button were all vets when they finally got their wins). Overall, the list is a bit shorter than I would have guessed.

#3 craftverk

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 19:53

I think it's safe to say that Kubica is more skilled than most of them.. if not all of them. But then again, I like Kubica. :stoned:

#4 postajegenye

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:20

Originally posted by John B
Without knowing the details of the historical drivers I'd guess RK is probably the youngest, or close to the youngest of the group (Alesi, Trulli, Button were all vets when they finally got their wins). Overall, the list is a bit shorter than I would have guessed.


Button was just 26... ;) Still 3 years older than Kubica but I wouldn't call him a veteran driver

#5 Gecko

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:24

Interesting, some very good names in that list!

I think Kubica will go on to win many many more races, with performances like this year it would be very weird if he would not keep a seat in one of the top teams in the foreseeable future.

#6 sterling49

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:37

Originally posted by craftverk
I think it's safe to say that Kubica is more skilled than most of them.. if not all of them. But then again, I like Kubica. :stoned:


How could you say that? Did you ever see Francoise Cevert drive? Or Gethin or Bandini for that matter, some of the list were tragically taken early from us, but please do not ever under estimate therir skills, Cevert in particular had it by the bucketload. In fact all of the list are talented, some were just not lucky enough to string wins together, look at Chris Amon. I do not doubt that Kubica is the real deal, and hopefully he will win many more races yet, but even if/when he does, I couldn't say that he has more skill than those named in the list.

#7 taran

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:43

Originally posted by craftverk
I think it's safe to say that Kubica is more skilled than most of them.. if not all of them. But then again, I like Kubica. :stoned:


What complete and utter toss. Have you even followed F1 for more than a week?
Instead of bending over for Kubica 24/7, you might want to do some research on other drivers before showing the world what a moron you are.

#8 Craven Morehead

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:44

Originally posted by postajegenye


Button was just 26... ;) Still 3 years older than Kubica but I wouldn't call him a veteran driver


Button entered F1 in 2000. The win came in '06. I'd say that six years in F1 makes him a 'veteran'.

#9 Risil

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:50

Originally posted by sterling49


How could you say that? Did you ever see Francoise Cevert drive? Or Gethin or Bandini for that matter, some of the list were tragically taken early from us, but please do not ever under estimate therir skills, Cevert in particular had it by the bucketload. In fact all of the list are talented, some were just not lucky enough to string wins together, look at Chris Amon. I do not doubt that Kubica is the real deal, and hopefully he will win many more races yet, but even if/when he does, I couldn't say that he has more skill than those named in the list.


Gethin was primarily a F5000 driver, wasn't he? He was talented, especially in those machines, but the fact that his only win came at pre-chicane Monza probably says something. Robert Kubica is a future world champion and one of the best drivers in the current field.

That said, it's a little misleading to list drivers whose careers were cut short by death or injury as 'one hit wonders'. Cervert (especially), Bandini and Nannini stand out on that list as drivers who could've accomplished a lot more given full careers. Maybe Innes Ireland too, if he'd kept the Lotus drive. And who knows what Panis and Prost might've achieved without his accident at Montreal. But IMO as far as drivers of different eras can be compared, Kubica is up there with anyone in that list.

#10 sterling49

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 21:01

Originally posted by Risil


Gethin was primarily a F5000 driver, wasn't he? He was talented, especially in those machines, but the fact that his only win came at pre-chicane Monza probably says something. Robert Kubica is a future world champion and one of the best drivers in the current field.

That said, it's a little misleading to list drivers whose careers were cut short by death or injury as 'one hit wonders'. Cervert (especially), Bandini and Nannini stand out on that list as drivers who could've accomplished a lot more given full careers. Maybe Innes Ireland too, if he'd kept the Lotus drive. And who knows what Panis and Prost might've achieved without his accident at Montreal. But IMO as far as drivers of different eras can be compared, Kubica is up there with anyone in that list.


I didn't say that he wasn't, just that the driversi in the list were better (much) than the throw away comments made, Gethin was (lucky?) to win that race, it could have been (from memory) anyone of six drivers (the good old days!) If I were really critical, there are more drivers in "that list" that have more than a modicum of skil, and I saw the vast majority of them.

#11 BlackCat

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 22:23

for me at least Beltoise was quite a surprise also. Kubica, on the other hand, was not :wave:

#12 pingu666

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 00:47

theres plenty of good drivers who never even won in f1

actully there was a thread on who would be the 100th winner in f1, now f1 is about 60years old, so on average thats 1.something new winners a year. remarkably low really

#13 Rob G

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 01:56

Originally posted by arthurive
Why so many Italians :rolleyes:
My guys can never get a break, even in history.......

If it's any consolation, in a way Fagioli doesn't really belong on this list since he won a lot of pre-F1 Grands Prix.

#14 arthurive

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 18:57

Originally posted by Rob G

If it's any consolation, in a way Fagioli doesn't really belong on this list since he won a lot of pre-F1 Grands Prix.


True enough.
Still the "Italian disease" continues to this day :

#15 anbeck

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 21:07

And Kubica is the only one that will leave that list, I cannot possibly see Trulli or Button win another Grand Prix. In fact, I cannot see either of them driving for another team as they are driving currently.

#16 Imperial

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 21:11

It's a joke putting any active driver on this list.

As long as the chance to win more races remains, as is very clear in at least Kubica's case, it's frankly a bit short-sighted to label such drivers as one-hit wonders.



And for that matter this is yet again another thread that should be in TNF not Racing.

#17 Jerome

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 22:08

Brazil - Carlos Pace - died in a planecrash. Did not have the chance to prove he was not a onehit wonder
Francois Cevert - Died in an accident at Watkins Glenn. Ditto.
Peter Gethin - crash in Kyalamy. Ditto.
Alessandro Nannini - helicopter crash that severed his arm. Ditto.
Bandini - died in a fiery crash at Monaco. Ditto.
Gunnar Nilson - died of cancer the year after he had his first topcar (Lotus) and his first win.


All I can say this list is idiotic without mentioning these circumstances.

#18 snx843

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 22:20

Shame for Cevert he was in the same team as Jackie.

He deserves more credit than 1 win.

Ceverts time was coming, sadly he died in the last race he was Jackies understudy.

#19 snx843

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 22:21

Originally posted by craftverk
I think it's safe to say that Kubica is more skilled than most of them.. if not all of them. But then again, I like Kubica. :stoned:


What non-sense!

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#20 snx843

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 22:25

What about godlike genius that never won a race?

Guys like Ricardo Rodriquez? Pedro's little brother. He died in his first race....I guess Kubica is better than him too?

Pedro was quick, genius on his day, his little brother was even better in anything he raced with previous to his one and only GP in Mexico 61?

#21 arthurive

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 12:38

Originally posted by Jerome
Brazil - Carlos Pace - died in a planecrash. Did not have the chance to prove he was not a onehit wonder
Francois Cevert - Died in an accident at Watkins Glenn. Ditto.
Peter Gethin - crash in Kyalamy. Ditto.
Alessandro Nannini - helicopter crash that severed his arm. Ditto.
Bandini - died in a fiery crash at Monaco. Ditto.
Gunnar Nilson - died of cancer the year after he had his first topcar (Lotus) and his first win.


All I can say this list is idiotic without mentioning these circumstances.


Settle down there lad!;)
I guess I should've titled the thread differently. I really just wanted to list drivers that have only
won one race, and discuss. I was never intending to imply anything beyond that.

#22 potmotr

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 12:54

I think Jean Alesi could have won many more times if the cards had fallen his way.
But there were races he should have won, like the European Grand Prix in 1995.
He had a massive lead then let his pace fall off in the middle section of the race and Schumacher caught him and took the win.

#23 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 13:32

Originally posted by snx843
What about godlike genius that never won a race?

Guys like Ricardo Rodriquez? Pedro's little brother. He died in his first race....I guess Kubica is better than him too?

Pedro was quick, genius on his day, his little brother was even better in anything he raced with previous to his one and only GP in Mexico 61?


You seem to be in error with your information, which does not reflect the facts. Ricardo Rodriguez ran the 1961 Italian GP and then most of the 1962 GP and sports season for Ferrari. His unfortunate death in the Rob Walker Lotus at Mexico City during practice for the first Mexican GP, a non-championship event, deprived racing of yet another great talent.

#24 Earthling

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 13:36

Originally posted by potmotr
I think Jean Alesi could have won many more times if the cards had fallen his way.
But there were races he should have won, like the European Grand Prix in 1995.
He had a massive lead then let his pace fall off in the middle section of the race and Schumacher caught him and took the win.


His tires died on him... no way he could have held up Schumi much longer.
Kinda like Fisi and Kimi in Suzuka 2005, except Fisi took an awkward line at that last corner... If he hadnt, Kimi would have still overtaken him on the long straight following up.

#25 Josta

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 13:37

Originally posted by snx843
What about godlike genius that never won a race?

Guys like Ricardo Rodriquez? Pedro's little brother. He died in his first race....I guess Kubica is better than him too?

Pedro was quick, genius on his day, his little brother was even better in anything he raced with previous to his one and only GP in Mexico 61?


It was actually his 6th GP and it was in practice, not the race.

#26 potmotr

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 14:20

Originally posted by Earthling


His tires died on him... no way he could have held up Schumi much longer.


I remember reading somewhere (a very long time ago) that the team were telling him to go faster. He'd had such a large lead that he'd started to cruise. I thought it was only when he realised Schumacher was upon him that he panicked and tried to up the pace, shagging his tyres? This was ages ago, I'll try and find a link to back this up.

#27 Atreiu

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 14:37

I hope Heidfeld joins the list and then leaves it ASAP.

Maybe he can pull it off at Valencia or Singapore, if the races are chaotic enough and he keeps it in one piece.

#28 Jerome

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 15:19

Originally posted by arthurive


Settle down there lad!;)
I guess I should've titled the thread differently. I really just wanted to list drivers that have only
won one race, and discuss. I was never intending to imply anything beyond that.


I am down on the rug... but onehit-wonders, that's a bit... well, implying. But I am calm. I'm not mad. I SHOULD BE IN MY GARDEN, DRINKING BEER, EATING STEAK FROM THE BARBECUE!

;)

#29 F1Fanatic.co.uk

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 15:23

I always thought Nannini a very promising driver. But for the helicopter crash that cost him his arm he could have easily won more races. Shortly after his F1 career ended his former team mate Nelson Piquet won two Grands Prix for Benetton at the end of 1990 and another in 1991, any of which could well have been Nannini's...

#30 Perigee

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 15:30

Chesney Hawkes!

#31 arthurive

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 16:42

Originally posted by F1Fanatic.co.uk
I always thought Nannini a very promising driver. But for the helicopter crash that cost him his arm he could have easily won more races. Shortly after his F1 career ended his former team mate Nelson Piquet won two Grands Prix for Benetton at the end of 1990 and another in 1991, any of which could well have been Nannini's...


Nannini is probably my favourite driver of them all, so I'm biased.
There was talk that he would've gotten a Ferrari contract by 1991 or 1992.
The Ferrari was awful in 1992 and destroyed Ivan Capelli's career, so maybe the severed arm was a good thing ;)
But seriously, he was tough as nails and quick enough, though not blindingly quick.
A few more wins, likely.

#32 Locai

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 16:48

As far as "lucky wins" goes, wasn't Kubica's win more than a bit "lucky"?

Wasn't Kubica in 3rd place when Hamilton (2nd place) decided to run the red light and slam into the back of Kimi (1st place)? Even if Kubica was in 1st or 2nd place at the time, he was stopped right next to Kimi when Hamilton came crashing through. Had Hamilton decided to pull up behind Kubica instead of Kimi then Kubica's race would most likely have ended and Kimi would have, presumably, been the one to continue on.

As far as "One hit wonders" go, I'm still 'wondering ' how Lewis picked which 'one' to 'hit' . :)

#33 Josta

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 17:04

Originally posted by Perigee
Chesney Hawkes!


I had a one and only, no more chart success for me. I had a one and only, and that was only thanks to buddy.

#34 bankoq

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 17:11

Originally posted by Locai
As far as "One hit wonders" go, I'm still 'wondering ' how Lewis picked which 'one' to 'hit' . :)


It's simple. He knew BMW is much slower than McLaren so theoretically it's better to eliminate the opponent who has better car to fight for WDC. Dirty little bastard...

#35 Youichi

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 17:17

Originally posted by Locai
As far as "lucky wins" goes, wasn't Kubica's win more than a bit "lucky"?

Wasn't Kubica in 3rd place when Hamilton (2nd place) decided to run the red light and slam into the back of Kimi (1st place)? Even if Kubica was in 1st or 2nd place at the time, he was stopped right next to Kimi when Hamilton came crashing through. Had Hamilton decided to pull up behind Kubica instead of Kimi then Kubica's race would most likely have ended and Kimi would have, presumably, been the one to continue on.

As far as "One hit wonders" go, I'm still 'wondering ' how Lewis picked which 'one' to 'hit' . :)


No Kubica was in first place (of those who'd stopped) when Lewis (in 3rd) ran into Kimi (in 2nd)

#36 Bogs

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 18:32

I think someone was sipping too much Lewis juice. He said he was going to win easily in Canada. Guess the impact into the BACK of Kimi must have shaken his memory. Kubica was going to lead the race, followed by Kimi, followed by Lewis.

No doubt the Lewis brain fart helped Kubica. But when you are consitently near the top (in a car that has less pace) you will eventually get some wins.

Kubica won't be in this 1 hit wonder list for long.

#37 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 19:40

Originally posted by arthurive
Brazil - Carlos Pace
France - Jean Alesi
Francois Cevert
JP Beltoise
Olivier Panis
GB - Jenson Button
Innes Ireland
Peter Gethin
Germany- Jochen Mass
Italy - Jarno Trulli
Alessandro Nannini
Lorenzo Bandini
Piero Taruffi
Ludovico Scarfiotti
Vittorio Brambilla
Giancarlo Baghetti
Luigi Musso*
Luigi Fagioli*
Sweden - Joakim Bonnier
Gunnar Nilsson
USA - Richie Ginther


As pointed out, several -- Pace, Cevert, Nannini, Bandini, Musso, Nilsson -- has their careers cut short by death or serious injury. Any of this group were fully capable of winning more, but the opportunity never happened.

Innes Ireland won the 1961 Solitude GP which was a full-blown WDC event in all name. Had Ireland remained with Team Lotus for the 1962 season, it is not out of the realm of possibilities that he would have added more WDC wins to his resume. He was a wonderful gent and racer, the sort for which the mold no longer exists. The Ireland-Clark duo could have given the BRM team a true run for its money, even if Ireland used the 24, which was not a bad machine....

Richie Ginther could have had more WDC wins, but sometimes Fate can be quite cruel. Several times during the 1961 season, Monte Carlo and Reims in particular, Ginther could have been the winner, giving Moss all he could handle and then having the machine and the weather combine to snatch defeat from a possible victory.

At Reims in 1961, it could just as easily have been Bonnier wearing the laurel wreath as Baghetti -- just as it could have been Gurney or Ginther or Phil Hill. Baghetti remains one of the great stories and questions of the era. However, despite an incredible WDC debut, the GP de l'ACF was his third consectutive victory in formula one, having already won in the two previous outing with the car: Syracuse (XI Gran Premio di Siracusa) and Posillipo (XIV Gran Premio di Napoli), which was entered not my SEFAC Ferrari, but a privateer team, Scuderia Sant'Ambroeus (which earlier had been FISA, Federazione Italiana Scuderie Automobilistiche), the only privateer Ferrari to win a WDC round. Unfortunately, Baghetti got caught up in the political turmoil that ripped apart Ferrari in 1962 and wound up, along with Phil Hill, at ATS for the 1963 season, both having a year that would make a nightmare look look good.

There are other stories behind those who only appear on the world championship victory lisiting once, there being more to their wins than simply holding the lucky lotto ticket that day.

#38 giacomo

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 19:43

Originally posted by F1Fanatic.co.uk
I always thought Nannini a very promising driver. But for the helicopter crash that cost him his arm he could have easily won more races. Shortly after his F1 career ended his former team mate Nelson Piquet won two Grands Prix for Benetton at the end of 1990 and another in 1991, any of which could well have been Nannini's...

You are suggesting that Nannini was better than the aging Piquet in 1990. Actually he wasn't.

#39 Locai

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 12:52

Originally posted by Youichi


No Kubica was in first place (of those who'd stopped) when Lewis (in 3rd) ran into Kimi (in 2nd)


Actually, I went back and watched that bit of the race last night on TiVo (world's greatest invention ever!). Kubica was definitely in second behind the Safety Car immediately before the pit stops. I've since forgotten which one was in first and which one was in 3rd (crap, I'm getting old!), but I 'think' that the order was Safety Car/Lewis/Robert/Kimi before the pitstop.

While I firmly believe that a certain amount of "luck" is usually involved in most race wins, a driver is certainly going to be "luckier" the closer they are to the front.

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#40 David M. Kane

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 13:32

Given the extent of Beltoise's arm injury he did amazingly well. It was my understanding that the heavy rain at Monaco was great equalizer for him. His steering was angled extremely in an attempt to give him more leverage. He also did well in the lady department when he married Cervert's sister. She was/is one of the most striking women I have ever laid my eyes on.

#41 Bernd Rosemeyer

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 13:49

Originally posted by potmotr
I think Jean Alesi could have won many more times if the cards had fallen his way.
But there were races he should have won, like the European Grand Prix in 1995.
He had a massive lead then let his pace fall off in the middle section of the race and Schumacher caught him and took the win.

Alesi's only win came only after Schumacher suffered an unscheduled pitstop. He wouldn't be on the list otherwise.

#42 Smudger

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 14:49

Baghetti was a strange case. He was the only man to win his first Grand Prix (apart from the winner of the first F1GP and Indy 500) in a massively dominant Ferrari, admittedly, and didn't win again, or even step on a podium. In fact this was his 3rd consecutive F1 win, the others being non-championship races.

Cevert was a great talent, and had been groomed to take over JYS' mantle. He had championship potential.

#43 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 16:11

Originally posted by Smudger
Baghetti was a strange case. He was the only man to win his first Grand Prix (apart from the winner of the first F1GP and Indy 500) in a massively dominant Ferrari, admittedly, and didn't win again, or even step on a podium. In fact this was his 3rd consecutive F1 win, the others being non-championship races.


His particular Tipo 156 was not one of the "massively dominant" Ferraris, being one of the older chassis (0003) still with the 65 degree engine, and scarcely the equal of the team cars in performance, but still a tad better horsepower-wise than the Mark II Climax FPFs and the Porsches. He could have easily lost the race to Gurney (or Bonnier had his engine not cried "Enough!"), but Baghetti drove a smart race, used his head as much as his right foot to earn the win. Baghetti's win was not a foregone conclusion simply because his was the remaining Ferrari. Baghetti was smart enough to let Gurney have the lead at the last corner and to place himself so as to ensure that the combination of the Porsche's draft and the few extra horses would do the trick -- it could have all just as easily failed should he not have kept his cool and cleverly worked Gurney into position.

The 1962 season with Ferrari and the 1963 season with ATS dealt his career a blow that it never recovered from at the grand prix level. Then as now, the team and the circumstances dictated much of your fate in racing. However, when the chips were down, he did step and deliver a victory, as unexpected and improbable as it did seem at the time, his earlier wins notwithstanding. Again, it was a privateer entry of the team muletta, scarcely the stuff of victory.

#44 Locai

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 17:10

This is going a bit off on a tangent, but...

I just realized that I have a picture of Richie Ginther's winning Honda on my desk. The picture came off of a "Car and Driver" Page-A-Day calendar from April 22 of this year.

I saved the picture because I loved the design of the car and engine. It had a 1.5-liter V-12 that produced 230hp at 12k RPM. The car also had (what appear to be) pretty big tires and no wings whatsoever. The tires appear to have a tread pattern similar to what you would expect on a truck tire, so I'm not exactly sure if these are the type of tires that it would have raced on.

It's interesting to imagine where we would be today with F1 had they kept the specs at 1.5L, as many cylinders as you want, big fat tires, and no aero downforce.

1965 was (barely) before my time. Does anybody know what the top speed was for this car? What were the engine regs in '65?