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PANASONIC will make the biggest contribution to KERS


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#1 senna1985

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 18:53

toyota said a monkey can make kers that prodces 80 bhp which is the limit for the 2009 season.

That means everyone will have the same power.

The biggest challenge is the battery and how much it weighs and safety issue, this is the single most trickiest part about kers

a lot of team are saying KERS might exceed the 600kg weight limit, this is what teams are working on trying to make the KERS as light as possible.

Panasonic is the biggest battery manufacturer on earth and the most innovative.

They been working on all of toyotas project, standard battery on cars and they have produced every KERS battery for all of toyotas cars.



They even claim thier standard battery for toyotas f1 car is half the size and weight of any of the other formula 1 teams

http://www.panasonic...2431/index.html

panasonic last month went into the guiness world book of records they built the longest lasting batteries, same size batteries as other competitors but ever 20% more more powerfull then there closest rivals duracell and energerser

http://www.rockymoun...st-lasting-aas/


most teams think they can get the kers to be 30kg, but some teams aint sure if that weight will make the car slower, so thier building 2 cars 1 that is with kers and without.

I woudnt be surprised if toyota are only making 1 car fully knowing with panasonic battery technology and toyotas kers technology and last 10 years of collabration on the prius and other vehicles they will easily make the lightest KERS by a long shot.


Panasonic= way ahead of rivals in battery technology
toyota= 1 billion pound research on kers already and the most experianced and the best employees and engineers in green technology.


You want KERS, the best are easily panasonic and toyota

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#2 Ogami musashi

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 19:05

thanks for the info but posting it into the dedicated KERS thread would have been better imho.

Any mods to move the post?

#3 eoin

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 20:06

Honda make more engines than anyone else, but that doesn't make them the best in F1. I am sure Sony/Siemens and co will be able to provide very similar batteries for the other teams.

#4 senna1985

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 20:13

no i'm not talking about manufacturing.

im talking about panasonic have the most superior battery technology on the planet.

They recently went into the guiness world of book of records when they sent a 7 inch robot to climb the entire grand canyon in 7 hours with 2 aa batteries making them according to guiness world book of record 20% superior to the next best competitor.


panasonic also claim there formula 1 battery is half the weight of anyone in f1.

#5 Hyatt

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 20:39

i rate Panasonic very high ... but i dont buy that record-batteries talk ...

#6 random

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 20:43

Originally posted by Hyatt
i rate Panasonic very high ... but i dont buy that record-batteries talk ...


Neither do I, sounds like typical press release claims.

There are a lot of factors in battery design, there is no single design that is perfect for every use.

#7 pUs

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 21:10

Originally posted by senna1985



Panasonic= way ahead of rivals in battery technology
toyota= 1 billion pound research on kers already and the most experianced and the best employees and engineers in green technology.


You want KERS, the best are easily panasonic and toyota


I'm not as sure about that. Panasonic/Matsushita were very big in batteries 10-15 years ago, but other actors make quite a lot of NiMH/Lipo batteries these days.

Anyway, there's not much sense in looking at who's biggest on the consumer side of things, it doesn't say much about what company will be best prepared for developing better batteries for such a high-stress application as this. Personally I think the weight/size/packaging of the other stuff will be more critical than the actual batteries used.. will be interesting to watch.

But yeah, I think Toyota will come up with a nice system.

#8 senna1985

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 21:18

i think honda williams and toyota will rise to the top, these 3 wanted kers asap wereas ferrari, macca renault wanted it a year later plus bmw ferrari and macca are heavily concentrated on this year.

Its gonna be interesting taking away the aero macca and ferrari's strong point and bringing in kers which i think willi toy and honda will do the best

#9 Clatter

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 00:11

Originally posted by Hyatt
i rate Panasonic very high ... but i dont buy that record-batteries talk ...


I think the robot thing might be the figment of someones imagination, but they are in the Guinness book of records.
http://www.theage.co...0419846519.html


The also have the fastest AA powered car.
http://www.pocket-li...d-battery.phtml

#10 Mauseri

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 00:40

Originally posted by senna1985
toyota said a monkey can make kers that prodces 80 bhp which is the limit for the 2009 season.

That means everyone will have the same power.

The biggest challenge is the battery and how much it weighs and safety issue, this is the single most trickiest part about kers

a lot of team are saying KERS might exceed the 600kg weight limit, this is what teams are working on trying to make the KERS as light as possible.

Panasonic is the biggest battery manufacturer on earth and the most innovative.

They been working on all of toyotas project, standard battery on cars and they have produced every KERS battery for all of toyotas cars.



They even claim thier standard battery for toyotas f1 car is half the size and weight of any of the other formula 1 teams

http://www.panasonic...2431/index.html

panasonic last month went into the guiness world book of records they built the longest lasting batteries, same size batteries as other competitors but ever 20% more more powerfull then there closest rivals duracell and energerser

http://www.rockymoun...st-lasting-aas/


most teams think they can get the kers to be 30kg, but some teams aint sure if that weight will make the car slower, so thier building 2 cars 1 that is with kers and without.

I woudnt be surprised if toyota are only making 1 car fully knowing with panasonic battery technology and toyotas kers technology and last 10 years of collabration on the prius and other vehicles they will easily make the lightest KERS by a long shot.


Panasonic= way ahead of rivals in battery technology
toyota= 1 billion pound research on kers already and the most experianced and the best employees and engineers in green technology.


You want KERS, the best are easily panasonic and toyota

Thanks for the info but I have not read anywhere that Panasonic is a superior battery manufacturer. I bought a couple of them for digicam and they were like any other.

#11 WayFaster

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 08:29

A bit OT...

I bought a Rotel CD player back in 1994. The player came with 2 AA Panasonic standard (not alkaline) batteries for the remote control and the 2 AA are still functioning! Talk about long lasting!!! Granted that the remote isn't used that often but still after 14 years they have no leak and still have enough juice to power the remote... amazing really!

#12 Risil

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 11:27

If they have too much of an advantage they should even things out by forcing Toyota to run 'King Hiro Matsushita in one of their cars. :lol:

#13 VWadict

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 13:52

An inovative Japanese? It's hard to belive. I've been working with mechanical/electrical engineering for the last 30 years and I never saw such thing. Japanese are good on doing well things others have invented. In the battery field most os the "inventions" came from American Universities and companies, ore European companies like Varta (out of business now). Keeping it restricted to the F1 field, Honda and Toyota although spending lots of maney, are far from inovative. Inovative is beeng BMW with a much smaller budget.

#14 Yellowmc

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 14:14

Senna1985 is a dreamer, he regularly posts a lot of rubbish on other forums.

#15 rodlamas

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 18:04

Originally posted by Yellowmc
Senna1985 is a dreamer, he regularly posts a lot of rubbish on other forums.


Also we must not forget Toyota retired Trulli in Oz 2008 because the battery overheated...

So if they're trying to make it as light as possible it might be that Toyota won't finish any race or that they will have to turn off KERS for a certain amount of time.

#16 Josta

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 18:21

Originally posted by VWadict
An inovative Japanese? It's hard to belive. I've been working with mechanical/electrical engineering for the last 30 years and I never saw such thing. Japanese are good on doing well things others have invented. In the battery field most os the "inventions" came from American Universities and companies, ore European companies like Varta (out of business now). Keeping it restricted to the F1 field, Honda and Toyota although spending lots of maney, are far from inovative. Inovative is beeng BMW with a much smaller budget.


http://sqzm14.ust.hk...inventions.html

How can you say a daddy feeder and a chopsticks fan aren't innovative? :)

#17 HP

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 09:19

Originally posted by Josta


http://sqzm14.ust.hk...inventions.html

How can you say a daddy feeder and a chopsticks fan aren't innovative? :)

Practical is non of these inventions though, except maybe the butter stick (if one manages to keep it cool enough..)

The umbrella tube is outright dangerous for some people, especially in hot and humid climate.

If it need to be innovative though, I like Sony's sugar battery.

http://www.sony.net/...074E/index.html

#18 Andy Donovan

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 13:55

Originally posted by Josta


http://sqzm14.ust.hk...inventions.html

How can you say a daddy feeder and a chopsticks fan aren't innovative? :)

Wahey, it's Chindogu! They used to have these on a kid's technology program when I was young called 'It'll Never Work', I loved that show.

#19 Scaramanga

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 06:47

Originally posted by VWadict
An inovative Japanese? It's hard to belive. I've been working with mechanical/electrical engineering for the last 30 years and I never saw such thing. Japanese are good on doing well things others have invented. In the battery field most os the "inventions" came from American Universities and companies, ore European companies like Varta (out of business now). Keeping it restricted to the F1 field, Honda and Toyota although spending lots of maney, are far from inovative. Inovative is beeng BMW with a much smaller budget.


While I don't believe Toyota's F1 endeavors will benefit to any significant degree due to their Panasonic partnership. . .

Other then being borderline racist, your comments are factually incorrect (and must not make you much of a mechanical/electrical engineer). The modern Li-on battery, which you find in most laptops and cellphones, are lithium cobalt oxide batteries; which were first designed by the Japanese. Not to mention, the mass commercialization of the contemporary lithium-polymer batteries which were also done by the Japanese. Lithium manganese spinel cathodes however were first used by the Koreans, and Varta in not out of business so much as they were sold off to several American companies.