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Wat is it about NASCAR ? Trulli is Next.. !


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#1 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 14:16

http://www.duemotori...NASCAR_race.php

"They were the first two people (JPM, Speed) I visited with," Trulli, 33, is quoted as saying by Detroit Free Press.

"They were surprised to see me," the Italian, who last weekend contested the Canadian grand prix, added.


"Maybe one day -- a test or something," Trulli said. "It's all sound and feeling. Everything is exciting and unexpected." .."I like the U.S. and having another (racing) experience would be good."

"It's all so different from formula one," Associated Press also quoted him as saying.

He said he respects NASCAR drivers.

"It's not so easy as people think," he insisted. "Juan is having a bit of a hard time. The racing is very tough."

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#2 mursuka80

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 14:49

Well,if you cant succeed in road racing tracks try ovals :rolleyes:

#3 SeanValen

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 14:57

Sounds like Trulli is realising his f1 days don't have a bright future.
He's had some good moments, mostly the first half of 2004, but largely inconsistent in his career, new drivers coming in, he's getting older, Toyota aren't doing anything special, just making up the numbers, he can't even have a dig at pole position, and he's fast in quali, so why stay in f1......... One gp win at Monaco, some money in the bank, he an't going to get a f1 title.

There's always a chance he might do well in another series or mostly he's get paid to top up a pension f1 driver ex collection bucket bank. :smoking: :smoking: :smoking: :up:

#4 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 15:29

It seems everything is seen as "Driver X going for NASCAR!!!"

Dunno. Trulli uses expressions like "maybe", "one day", "test or smth". Some time ago, DC explained he is NOT going for NASCAR, and lots of folks translated his comments "hey! DC wants in!". The main difference is these days F1 drivers receive questions about NASCAR (because of JPM, JV and Speed). They give polite answer - sometimes honest, sometimes not - and refuse to rule anything out. That´s about it.

#5 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 15:34

they didn't actually traveled several thousand miles to watch a race from the pits did they?

#6 F1Fanatic.co.uk

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 15:41

Given that some NASCAR followers deride F1 fans as "wine and cheese eaters" I'm sure an Italian winemaker would go down a storm in NASCAR :D

#7 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 15:48

Originally posted by BMW_F1
they didn't actually traveled several thousand miles to watch a race from the pits did they?


Lots of "Average Joes" do that in every GP weekend. Why not folks who have endless amount of money for airline tickets and two ex-rivals from F1 racing in NASCAR?

#8 Phucaigh

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 16:03

Originally posted by mursuka80
Well,if you cant succeed in road racing tracks try ovals :rolleyes:


It is a road race next Sunday.

#9 sopa

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 16:32

I hope Trulli stays in F1 at least until 2012. He'll be 38 then. Why not even longer and become a Mansell by winning a title at the end of his 30's.;)

#10 Buttoneer

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 16:49

"Wat (sic) is it about NASCAR ?"

It's a more exciting spectator experience than most are prepared to give credit for.

#11 wrighty

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 17:08

Originally posted by mursuka80
Well,if you cant succeed in road racing tracks try ovals :rolleyes:


yeah, and if you can't grasp that there's more to racing than F1, why try? :rolleyes:

seconded @ Buttoneer btw :up:

#12 mursuka80

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 17:33

Originally posted by wrighty


yeah, and if you can't grasp that there's more to racing than F1, why try? :rolleyes:

seconded @ Buttoneer btw :up:


Did i diss you or something? My opinion is that Nascar is fun to watch,but the best drivers dont always win and thats crap

#13 wrighty

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 17:47

Originally posted by mursuka80


Did i diss you or something? My opinion is that Nascar is fun to watch,but the best drivers dont always win and thats crap


oh i get tired of people painting oval racing as a poor relation of 'proper' racing (not my opinion, merely that which has been forced upon me to many times on here)....i grew up with oval racing and i know the time and effort that people make to be competitive in this form of racing......we've seen many drivers start off in oval racing and then get to the highest levels of world motorsports but yet NASCAR, probably the highest, most competitive most stringently administered, most high-profile and (in its way) most arduous of racing sports still gets the 'Well,if you cant succeed in road racing tracks try ovals :rolleyes: ' kinda comment and tbh i thought i'd remind you of your ignorance in case you hadn't realised it yourself......

:kiss:

#14 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 17:53

Originally posted by mursuka80


Did i diss you or something? My opinion is that Nascar is fun to watch,but the best drivers dont always win and thats crap


that is not totally true.

#15 pingu666

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 18:14

hmm no more than any other motorsport i guess, remmber there are 43 drivers at every race, plus some randoms who turnup and try and qualify... its very very competative
F1 is limited to realisticaly 2 to 6 drivers, average of 4 who can win the race

#16 fastlegs

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 18:32

Originally posted by Buttoneer
"Wat (sic) is it about NASCAR ?"

It's a more exciting spectator experience than most are prepared to give credit for.


Personally I'd have to disagree based on attending my first NASCAR race last March in Las Vegas.

For the first 25 or so laps it was okay, however, after that it started to get pretty boring. The cars were going around mostly in single file. It was similar to watching the qualifying sessions the day before. I went there with a very open mind wanting to really become a fan and left somewhat disappointed.

I kept thinking that maybe my experience would be different if I was watching a race at a super speedway such as Daytona instead of the 1.5 mile track in Las Vegas.

Years ago close to where I live we had a 3/8 mile paved oval track. I really enjoyed watching the old stock car races there. It was much more exciting for me watching the races there than it was in Las Vegas.

#17 mursuka80

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 18:58

Originally posted by wrighty


oh i get tired of people painting oval racing as a poor relation of 'proper' racing (not my opinion, merely that which has been forced upon me to many times on here)....i grew up with oval racing and i know the time and effort that people make to be competitive in this form of racing......we've seen many drivers start off in oval racing and then get to the highest levels of world motorsports but yet NASCAR, probably the highest, most competitive most stringently administered, most high-profile and (in its way) most arduous of racing sports still gets the 'Well,if you cant succeed in road racing tracks try ovals :rolleyes: ' kinda comment and tbh i thought i'd remind you of your ignorance in case you hadn't realised it yourself......

:kiss:


I have only watched Nascar for sixmonths and maybe i shouldn`t judge the sport so early :up: Im sorry about my comments,they were not necessary :wave:

#18 wrighty

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 19:20

Originally posted by mursuka80


I have only watched Nascar for sixmonths and maybe i shouldn`t judge the sport so early :up: Im sorry about my comments,they were not necessary :wave:


thank you for that :up: oval racing's many and varied forms take a lifetime to come across m8, god knows even just here in the UK, never mind in the US lol. NASCAR's basically F1 from another planet, the cream of the crop but there's a whole world of divisions and lesser formulae and 'grass-roots' racing below the cream that's often just as entertaining as the 'top level' stuff :) Sorry for jumping at you and thanks again :up:

#19 whitewaterMkII

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 19:22

Originally posted by fastlegs


Personally I'd have to disagree based on attending my first NASCAR race last March in Las Vegas.

For the first 25 or so laps it was okay, however, after that it started to get pretty boring. The cars were going around mostly in single file. It was similar to watching the qualifying sessions the day before. I went there with a very open mind wanting to really become a fan and left somewhat disappointed.


I won't quibble with that assessment. I used to have season tickets at the California Speedway, but NASCAR is boring there so I gave them up.
I would like to go to Phoenix though, that track seems to put on a pretty good show.

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#20 Bouncing Pink Ball

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 19:49

I'll be honest, I find the NASCAR races grow kind of dull during the middle. I've lived in an oval racing region and have seen my share of “cars driving in circles” (no insult intended, BTW) from a variety of skill levels. I've seen some good oval races and some crap road events, and vice versa. There are good and bad things to be said about any oval-based series, just as there are about road and street course racing. NASCAR (or oval racing in general) isn't as well suited to my taste, especially if talking about attending a live event, but that's not to say I don't have respect for the drivers who train with a career on the oval tracks as a goal.

Of course participants from different series are asked their opinions when attending NASCAR (or F1, or WRC...) races, but they're often there for the same reasons as everyone else – they want to watch motorsports. That doesn't mean they plan to switch series immediately, they could just simply be race fans.

#21 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 19:55

Originally posted by Bouncing Pink Ball


Of course participants from different series are asked their opinions when attending NASCAR (or F1, or WRC...) races, but they're often there for the same reasons as everyone else – they want to watch motorsports. That doesn't mean they plan to switch series immediately, they could just simply be race fans.


that is a possibility as it is could also mean that they are interested in the racing and want to get close and personal with the series to get a feel for what it would be like to race in NASCAR and are to hesitant to commit to such a huge change.

#22 Go_Scotty_Go!

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:15

Originally posted by wrighty


thank you for that :up: oval racing's many and varied forms take a lifetime to come across m8, god knows even just here in the UK, never mind in the US lol. NASCAR's basically F1 from another planet, the cream of the crop but there's a whole world of divisions and lesser formulae and 'grass-roots' racing below the cream that's often just as entertaining as the 'top level' stuff :) Sorry for jumping at you and thanks again :up:


I think it is a perfectly acceptable view to consider road racing a finer discipline than oval racing, it does in fact test the driver more completely with braking, lots of different types of corners, running the fastest line around the track (with much more emphasis on lap times and racing line), difficult passing - wet weather driving...

No doubt NASCAR is one of the top series worldwide just for the sake of how the parity formula makes it ultra-competitive - but there is no way in its current form with 95% ovals that its the true test of "racing" like so many like to claim...oval racing does not somehow moot the skills required for road racing...and I think that is what many people like to point out relative to NASCAR - it's just so hard to make this simple point about NASCAR without a bunch of grief from the fans for stating this opinion...(you are a snob if you think road racing is better than ovals, there is really no skill on display in high tech cars, NASCAR is the best racing in the world...blah blah blah).

I do follow NASCAR, but right now in the states is being pushed as the end all be all of racing and I am sorry but it just isn't, it is one of a good 5 or 6 great series worldwide...

#23 prxty

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:18

Originally posted by Buttoneer
"Wat (sic) is it about NASCAR ?"

It's a more exciting spectator experience than most are prepared to give credit for.

Well it seems that is exciting only for "some" spectators.
Many racing fans find it really boring, even for a short replay of half an hour.
That's the main reason it is not expanding its audience.

#24 HoldenRT

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:33

Originally posted by mursuka80
Well,if you cant succeed in road racing tracks try ovals :rolleyes:

Ovals>you

#25 Josta

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:40

I would be interested in a scientific experiment that discovers % of people with more fingers than normal in nascar fans compared to non nascar fans. :D

Note to Nascar fans on here. I am not saying that all nascar fans are rednecks, but all rednecks are nascar fans.

#26 pingu666

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:50

Originally posted by Go_Scotty_Go!


I think it is a perfectly acceptable view to consider road racing a finer discipline than oval racing, it does in fact test the driver more completely with braking, lots of different types of corners, running the fastest line around the track (with much more emphasis on lap times and racing line), difficult passing - wet weather driving...

No doubt NASCAR is one of the top series worldwide just for the sake of how the parity formula makes it ultra-competitive - but there is no way in its current form with 95% ovals that its the true test of "racing" like so many like to claim...oval racing does not somehow moot the skills required for road racing...and I think that is what many people like to point out relative to NASCAR - it's just so hard to make this simple point about NASCAR without a bunch of grief from the fans for stating this opinion...(you are a snob if you think road racing is better than ovals, there is really no skill on display in high tech cars, NASCAR is the best racing in the world...blah blah blah).

I do follow NASCAR, but right now in the states is being pushed as the end all be all of racing and I am sorry but it just isn't, it is one of a good 5 or 6 great series worldwide...



oval racing is different skill set, but it does test different corners(plus banking thrown in..) and running the fastest line round the track, which is more likely to change than a road course...

imo oval racing requires alot more finese and consistancy than circuit racing, and very good setup skills.

that said, i havent found the nascar races ive watched that amazing, could be its success is abit like F1's, its abit boring but we still like it and dunno why :lol: . nascar is probably a great event to go see tho :)

#27 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:57

We all know roadies are tougher to DRIVE. Doesn´t mean roadies are tougher to RACE. IMHO both are equally difficult, assuming the level of the opposition is the same. Whether this is the case with F1 vs NASCAR, no comment.

#28 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 20:59

why can't people just accept that they are two different categories with different skill set requirements.

two different things need to be learned. Which is harder/easier/more challenging is not really something that we can really tell for sure but just speculate. Maybe a driver which has participated on both series has a better insight on this...

#29 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:01

Originally posted by Spunout
We all know roadies are tougher to DRIVE.


not on certain ovals where you have rookies hitting the wall most of the time their first time around..

#30 Risil

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:06

I guess Tony George has won. American open-wheel racing is no longer the F1 retirement home of choice! :lol:

#31 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:08

Originally posted by BMW_F1


not on certain ovals where you have rookies hitting the wall most of the time their first time around..


What I wrote is true in 99% of cases. That´s good enough. There are reasons why we have succesful cross-overs from roadies to ovals (Montoya, Speed, Mansell, Zanardi, etc) but virtually no cases where oval-only racer moved to roadies and lapped fast pretty much from Day One. Most "oval guys" had plenty of roadie experience before moving to F1, etc.

#32 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:34

Originally posted by Spunout


What I wrote is true in 99% of cases. That´s good enough. There are reasons why we have succesful cross-overs from roadies to ovals (Montoya, Speed, Mansell, Zanardi, etc) but virtually no cases where oval-only racer moved to roadies and lapped fast pretty much from Day One. Most "oval guys" had plenty of roadie experience before moving to F1, etc.


I think DC would disagree with you but of course you know more as always..

DC
"I believe a NASCAR driver could adapt to a single-seater F1 car more quickly than we could in NASCAR," he said. "And I'm not just saying that to be nice because I'm here. The NASCAR drivers have to fight these heavy cars around these ovals. Any F1 driver understands how difficult that is. I have great respect for these guys.

#33 Imperial

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:45

Seen as how this has turned into an ovals Vs road-course thread I'm probably wasting my time posting this, but for what it's worth...

It doesn't seem to have struck anyone else yet, but there are two things that immediately sprang to mind for me:

1) He went to visit the Toyota bunch.
2) He actually is a sportsman in love with his sport and wanted to see a race when the opportunity presented itself (in the form of Toyota paying for his airfare and accomodation no doubt).

There's no testing taking place right now, what else has he got to do with his time? I somehow don't think the wedding invite from Flavio was merely lost in the post...

It must be annoying as **** to be a racing driver, especially one out of his 20's, and actually want to attend an event just for the sake of it. Cue the inevitable speculation. :

#34 ex Rhodie racer

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:45

It´s no different to washed up MGP riders switching their attention to world superbike racing. Another payday, even if it means stepping down from the top class. Their name ensures the team that hires them will get the benefit of the publicity that comes with their involvement, even if the results don´t live up to the hype. You can´t replace hunger to survive with a pension scheme.

#35 pingu666

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:46

actully, which oval only race drivers have tried?

#36 wrighty

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:47

Originally posted by Spunout


.....There are reasons why we have succesful cross-overs from roadies to ovals (Montoya, Speed, Mansell, Zanardi, etc) but virtually no cases where oval-only racer moved to roadies and lapped fast pretty much from Day One.


Martin Brundle
Derek Warwick
Paul Warwick

spring to mind as drivers who started off in oval racing and went on to a certain amount of success... Paul would've made it to GP too i'm sure, had he not been taken so young. Mike Jordan and Rob Collard are both ex-oval, both previous winners in BTCC, Barry Lee was known to pedal occasionally around circuits in his time etc etc etc... i'll grant you, if an ex-GP driver doesn't make it in a series like NASCAR we raise an eyebrow (JV springs to mind obv) but I think Speed is one example where people are realising that there's more to oval racing than 'just driving in circles'......JPM's been the best of the bunch and he hasn't trounced em, as creditable an effort as it's been.
I'm with Pingu, it's all about nuances.....you can't have a car at the start of an 500 mile oval race to your liking and expect it to still be the same at the end, the track changes, the line changes, the car changes.....nascar drivers have to adapt to the conditions, read the track and go racing too.....miss the wrecks, watch the lapping traffic, and be there through 'the boring bit' (spare me) to have a chance at the end.

oh @ Go_Scotty_Go, I probably should have said NASCAR is the cream of 'its' crop, rather than the crop....it's the top step on a long long grind (you know this, i realise) through the regional series up, and while i'll readily agree the racing is NOT what it has been since the advent of CoT it's still the pinnacle of oval racing in the US i believe, with the exception probably of Indy (as a race, not a series), given number of drivers who've stepped up to NASCAR from Outlaws and such.

#37 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:48

Originally posted by BMW_F1


I think DC would disagree with you but of course you know more as always..

DC
"I believe a NASCAR driver could adapt to a single-seater F1 car more quickly than we could in NASCAR," he said. "And I'm not just saying that to be nice because I'm here. The NASCAR drivers have to fight these heavy cars around these ovals. Any F1 driver understands how difficult that is. I have great respect for these guys.


The point was roadies vs ovals.

I´ll repeat my earlier points:

1) DC hasn´t raced in NASCAR

2) Nobody from NASCAR has moved to F1

Montoya moved to NASCAR - completely new racing discipline for him - and pulled it off. ROTY award, win, best performer of his team, you name it. Yep, he struggled initially. But remember 2001? He struggled in F1 as well. It was Ralf who scored more points that year, plus 3 wins compared to 1 by JPM. Think about it. JPM = top talent with stellar open-wheel/road course CV. Now I am expected to believe guys who cannot beat him with NASCAR vehicles, on NASCAR roadies, are supposed to have easier time with F1 cars, on F1 tracks? Doesn´t make sense, I´m afraid. The fact is, as long as most NASCAR guys keep asking Boris or Juan (2007 rookie!!!) how to get around their roadies, with their cars, I can see one massive learning curve in the case Dale Jr or Jimmie Johnson moves to F1. And we are talking about Cup top guns here!

Let me put it this way: it is easier to move from motorcycles to open-wheelers than the other way around. That doesn´t mean motorcycles are more challenging. That´s the way it is, for one reason or another.

I know ever since Juan Pablo Montoya moved to NASCAR, your mission has been to prove NASCAR - a series you showed little respect before 2007 - is the king of the hill. Well, in its on discipline...it is.

Things are the way things are. Don´t blame me for that :)

#38 Josta

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:56

Originally posted by wrighty


Martin Brundle
Derek Warwick
Paul Warwick

spring to mind as drivers who started off in oval racing and went on to a certain amount of success... Paul would've made it to GP too i'm sure, had he not been taken so young. Mike Jordan and Rob Collard are both ex-oval, both previous winners in BTCC, Barry Lee was known to pedal occasionally around circuits in his time etc etc etc... i'll grant you, if an ex-GP driver doesn't make it in a series like NASCAR we raise an eyebrow (JV springs to mind obv) but I think Speed is one example where people are realising that there's more to oval racing than 'just driving in circles'......JPM's been the best of the bunch and he hasn't trounced em, as creditable an effort as it's been.
I'm with Pingu, it's all about nuances.....you can't have a car at the start of an 500 mile oval race to your liking and expect it to still be the same at the end, the track changes, the line changes, the car changes.....nascar drivers have to adapt to the conditions, read the track and go racing too.....miss the wrecks, watch the lapping traffic, and be there through 'the boring bit' (spare me) to have a chance at the end.

oh @ Go_Scotty_Go, I probably should have said NASCAR is the cream of 'its' crop, rather than the crop....it's the top step on a long long grind (you know this, i realise) through the regional series up, and while i'll readily agree the racing is NOT what it has been since the advent of CoT it's still the pinnacle of oval racing in the US i believe, with the exception probably of Indy (as a race, not a series), given number of drivers who've stepped up to NASCAR from Outlaws and such.


All 3 drivers drove in British Formula 3. Do you really think British F3 is oval???

#39 wrighty

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:58

Originally posted by Josta


All 3 drivers drove in British Formula 3. Do you really think British F3 is oval???


all 3 started off in ovals, Brundle in local Hot rods and the Warwicks both in superstox (a 2-ltr contact formula) or is that too early to count as 'came up through'?

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#40 metz

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:58

Originally posted by BMW_F1
why can't people just accept that they are two different categories with different skill set requirements.

two different things need to be learned. Which is harder/easier/more challenging is not really something that we can really tell for sure but just speculate. Maybe a driver which has participated on both series has a better insight on this...

Exactly.
The guy that changed my mind about ovals was Greg Moore. (RIP)
He put it this way.
There are only 3 things you need to have a race.
A driver, a car and a track.
A driver will do everything in his power to go as fast as possible.
The engineers will design the car to go as fast as possible.
If track designers did the same, we would all be driving in circles.
Ovals are the next best thing.

#41 ex Rhodie racer

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 21:59

Originally posted by BMW_F1


I think DC would disagree with you but of course you know more as always..

DC
"I believe a NASCAR driver could adapt to a single-seater F1 car more quickly than we could in NASCAR," he said. "And I'm not just saying that to be nice because I'm here. The NASCAR drivers have to fight these heavy cars around these ovals. Any F1 driver understands how difficult that is. I have great respect for these guys.

Ok, let me guess. Where do you think DC will be this time next year? Mmmmmmm...................
He always was an opportunist.

#42 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:04

Originally posted by Spunout


The point was roadies vs ovals.

I´ll repeat my earlier points:

1) DC hasn´t raced in NASCAR

2) Nobody from NASCAR has moved to F1

Montoya moved to NASCAR - completely new racing discipline for him - and pulled it off. ROTY award, win, best performer of his team, you name it. Yep, he struggled initially. But remember 2001? He struggled in F1 as well. It was Ralf who scored more points that year, plus 3 wins compared to 1 by JPM. Think about it. JPM = top talent with stellar open-wheel/road course CV. Now I am expected to believe guys who cannot beat him with NASCAR vehicles, on NASCAR roadies, are supposed to have easier time with F1 cars, on F1 tracks? Doesn´t make sense, I´m afraid. The fact is, as long as most NASCAR guys keep asking Boris or Juan (2007 rookie!!!) how to get around their roadies, with their cars, I can see one massive learning curve in the case Dale Jr or Jimmie Johnson moves to F1. And we are talking about Cup top guns here!

Let me put it this way: it is easier to move from motorcycles to open-wheelers than the other way around. That doesn´t mean motorcycles are more challenging. That´s the way it is, for one reason or another.

I know ever since Juan Pablo Montoya moved to NASCAR, your mission has been to prove NASCAR - a series you showed little respect before 2007 - is the king of the hill. Well, in its on discipline...it is.

Things are the way things are. Don´t blame me for that :)


we can learn to disagree here but for the record you didn't know me before 2007 so you last comment was totally out of context. IMO, JPM is a versatile driver, that is a skill that not many drivers from any discipline have. JPM is the exception everyone says this not just me. Do your homework and research the how many open-wheelers have been successful transitioning to NASCAR.. other than Stewart.. Gordon does not count, he raced midgets, which is one of the feeder series to NASCAR..

#43 fastlegs

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:04

Originally posted by whitewaterMkII


I won't quibble with that assessment. I used to have season tickets at the California Speedway, but NASCAR is boring there so I gave them up.
I would like to go to Phoenix though, that track seems to put on a pretty good show.



The Phoenix area is one of my favorite places to visit so most likely I will attend a race at Phoenix to see how it differs from Las Vegas.

#44 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:05

Originally posted by wrighty


I'm with Pingu, it's all about nuances.....you can't have a car at the start of an 500 mile oval race to your liking and expect it to still be the same at the end, the track changes, the line changes, the car changes.....nascar drivers have to adapt to the conditions, read the track and go racing too.....miss the wrecks, watch the lapping traffic, and be there through 'the boring bit' (spare me) to have a chance at the end.


And this is exactly what I tried to point out.

For some "their" #1 series must be the most challenging at everything. Suggesting other series is more challenging even in one aspect of racing, that´s no no. When it comes to DRIVING, roadies are more challenging - period. When it comes to RACING, both are difficult. In different way, yes (you listed several factors that are less important on roadies)...but still you must beat the opposition to win, and that is never easy. When it comes to NASCAR, let´s keep in mind it´s the combination of different tracks and different cars. That´s tougher than familiar cars, unfamiliar tracks. Eg IndyCars. I cannot see Mansell or Montoya whipping all NASCAR boys in their first year, even with top car.

#45 Spunout

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:07

Originally posted by BMW_F1


Do your homework and research the how many open-wheelers have been successful transitioning to NASCAR.. other than Stewart.. Gordon does not count (SNIP)


How many stock car racers have been succesful transitioning to F1? Zero. GP2? Zero.



#46 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:07

Originally posted by metz

Exactly.
The guy that changed my mind about ovals was Greg Moore. (RIP)
He put it this way.
There are only 3 things you need to have a race.
A driver, a car and a track.
A driver will do everything in his power to go as fast as possible.
The engineers will design the car to go as fast as possible.
If track designers did the same, we would all be driving in circles.
Ovals are the next best thing.


I cannot compare racing in ovals on an INDY car vs a CUP car. If you think they are the same, you have no clue.

#47 Risil

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:07

Originally posted by wrighty


Martin Brundle
Derek Warwick
Paul Warwick

spring to mind as drivers who started off in oval racing and went on to a certain amount of success...


Uh, you forgot BorderReiver. :p

#48 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:09

Originally posted by Spunout


How many stock car racers have been succesful in F1?


how many have tried?

#49 BMW_F1

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:10

as an FYI.. I recently found out that Greg Biffle competed in British F3.. that's a shocker..

#50 Josta

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 22:13

Originally posted by wrighty


all 3 started off in ovals, Brundle in local Hot rods and the Warwicks both in superstox (a 2-ltr contact formula) or is that too early to count as 'came up through'?


Brundle started off in hot rods when he was 12. It is somewhat irrelevant to compare someone who from the age of 17 was driving proper circuits and graduated through saloon racing, F Ford 2000 and F3 before hitting F1 to someone who goes from only oval to F1. The Warwicks, Villeneuve and Montoya also had plenty of proper track experience before F1.

By your definition, Schumacher and Alonso started off in go karts, therefore people can go directly from go karts to F1 and win championships. :rolleyes: