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Early Holden racing


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#1101 275 GTB-4

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:21

Come on then! Enlighten those of us who haven't been there (and are unlikely to), what is it?


Alvis Speed 20...owned by a QLDer...it was there last November when I toured the North (can't wait to do the Sarf)

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#1102 D-Type

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:51

Thanks

Back to Holdens

#1103 Ray Bell

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 14:21

Or Zephyrs?

Not often one of these beat the Holdens, but Bruce Taylor did this day:

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#1104 D-Type

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 15:35

Or Zephyrs?

Not often one of these beat the Holdens, but Bruce Taylor did this day:

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Are you sure he isn't being lapped? ;)

#1105 Ray Bell

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 21:38

I read the race report...

It might have been a handicap, however, and note that the following Holdens are not top drivers.

#1106 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 22:16

The Mk1s were probably on par with the Holdens for potential performance though the Holden was cheaper to modify. Though Mk1s had a propensity for falling over!! And breaking rear axles shafts.
I had one as a stockcar in the late 60s and it did all of the above regularly. With an FJ I never broke an axle! And nor did the Vanguard either.

#1107 Ray Bell

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 23:28

Front stub axles (the bolt-on ones, remember?) were also suspect...

I've often been told that towies never rear-lifted early Zephyrs.

Mk 2s had fine splines to correct the rear axle problem, though, and they had the BMC-style semi-floating axle shafts which were quite a good thing.

#1108 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:08

Front stub axles (the bolt-on ones, remember?) were also suspect...

I've often been told that towies never rear-lifted early Zephyrs.

Mk 2s had fine splines to correct the rear axle problem, though, and they had the BMC-style semi-floating axle shafts which were quite a good thing.

Mk1 s had semi floaters too, just corse spline axles. Solving the axle tramp did help, then they only broke axles occasionally instaed of regularly.
At our stockcar track we never ever broke a Mk1 stub, luck maybe. Just a customline one, a wide Mainline rim with a 750x16 straight over the eaqrth fence into the drivers door of a parked car on the road!
In the distant past a mate used redrilled Mk1 axles in an Austin Lancer, the grandaddy of pommy axle breakers and never broke one after. Instead of a couple a month. [Yes he was a hoon!!]
Mk2 s solved most problems except for rust!! A few even had Disc brakes in the end.

Edited by Lee Nicolle, 03 January 2013 - 05:11.


#1109 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:52

Just to straighten it out a little, Lee...

Yes, I knew the Mk 1 had the semi-floaters, my remark about that being a good thing applied to the Zephyrs in general and I stopped short of saying 'unlike most Ford stuff.' The coarse splines would have suffered for the same reasons as Majors, Minors and other BMC cars... lever shock absorbers that failed to keep the wheels on the road!

This was the big improvement of the Major Elite (not the Series II), which was the model that also got the fine splines instead of coarse.

When racing with these BMC axles, the remedies included polishing the inside radius of the flange to stop them breaking off there; removing the tab washer on the bearing retaining nut and simply using Loctite; if really serious, neck down the axle shaft and polish it to give compliance.

#1110 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 21:36

Just to straighten it out a little, Lee...

Yes, I knew the Mk 1 had the semi-floaters, my remark about that being a good thing applied to the Zephyrs in general and I stopped short of saying 'unlike most Ford stuff.' The coarse splines would have suffered for the same reasons as Majors, Minors and other BMC cars... lever shock absorbers that failed to keep the wheels on the road!

This was the big improvement of the Major Elite (not the Series II), which was the model that also got the fine splines instead of coarse.

When racing with these BMC axles, the remedies included polishing the inside radius of the flange to stop them breaking off there; removing the tab washer on the bearing retaining nut and simply using Loctite; if really serious, neck down the axle shaft and polish it to give compliance.

On the mk1 we 'wrapped] the springs with fencing wire and eventually put FJ rear shocks on it. Very crude but at least partially effective. Though remember this was a truckie/ farmer and a 14 y/o [myself] And money was a severe object! All of the above were scrounged for nothing.

Strangely I have never heard of a Major breaking axles, but Lancers were terrible. Ladys doing the shopping broke axles, Dads driving to work broke axles. 17y/o hoons smashed axles weekly!!

#1111 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 22:57

So you kept Dufor in business?

It's hard to imagine how many rear axles were sold as spares for Minors and Majors.

#1112 Ian G

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 23:31

...you can also throw Land Rover into that list,i think they were used as concrete re-inforcing in the 1950's Snowy Mountains scheme before they changed to Toyota.

Happy New Year all.....

#1113 D-Type

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 23:40

Were the Land Rovers Australian-built ones?

#1114 Catalina Park

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 01:10

A mechanic in NSW dropped his Land Rover agency to take up a Toyota agency. In light of his Land Rover experience he bought a large supply of axle shafts for the LandCruisers. 30 years later when they cleared out the place all the Toyota axles were still there.

The Snowy Mountain Scheme was a big user of Land Rovers, they had hundreds of them. I know that a few years back Toyota made claims about the LandCruiser "building the Snowy" but I understand that there was only ever two LandCruisers sent there as a trial and they were returned shortly after. I wonder what the truth really is?
Sort of like VW claiming to have the first car in Antarctica when we know it isn't true.

#1115 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 01:22

The Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Authority also used Austin Gipsys (Gypsies?) during the construction period...

Maybe Champs as well, but I don't know that for sure. It would not be hard to go back through reports in the Open Road where they carried stories about the Authority and the vehicles they used.

Not forgetting, of course, that the large contracting companies doing the work might have had other vehicles. Kaiser Walsh Perini Raymond etc.

#1116 johnny yuma

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 01:33

Sir Leslie Theiss,construction magnate,brought "several" to the Snowy scheme in 1958.These were the first LandCruisers in Australia.He must have been impressed,he became the Queensland,then NSW,dealer in them.However you would have to say the really hard yards in the Snowy Scheme were almost made by 1958 so it's quite a stretch to say Landcruisers "built" the Snowy scheme.

#1117 Ian G

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 05:23

Were the Land Rovers Australian-built ones?


Getting OT but not sure Duncan,some were assembled in Oz from CKD in the 1950's,the info on breaking axles(and other problems) was in a book i read many years ago and was written by a Snowy Engineer,Rover apparently sent people out to find why they were failing.


http://www.aulro.com...l-toyota-4.html

#1118 eldougo

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 06:42

TNfers are having Ronnie Corbet moment........."But i Digress"
Back to Holden racing. :yawnface:

#1119 275 GTB-4

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 08:24

TNfers are having Ronnie Corbet moment........."But i Digress"
Back to Holden racing. :yawnface:


Corbett: So it's "Goodnight" from me.

Barker: And it's "Goodnight" from him.

Both: Goodnight!





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#1120 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 22:23

So you kept Dufor in business?

It's hard to imagine how many rear axles were sold as spares for Minors and Majors.

One of the blokes who raced there worked in a wrecking yard.Luckily they had supplies of some of these consumeables! Austin A70 wheels were another drama, they kept on pulling through the studs.

re Landrovers the original axle breaker from TV is at Birdwood mill Museum. The Leyland Bros one, though their driving style defenitly contributed to those failures.

And I have seen one early Landcruiser axle fail, it broke at the hub end. So they do break,,, at 40 years old. Going over a gutter towing a car trailer.

#1121 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 22:35

Pat Clarke sent me some photos to post... he didn't know their source, but I believe I have worked that out...

Warren Weldon leads John Hall:

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Weldon being pressed:

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Bruce Stewart:

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John Buchelin:

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This could be Brian Donovan leading, Graham Moore is the third car:

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Sorry, Buchelin is still going:

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And he wasn't the only one to get out of shape:

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But at least he was comprehensive:

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Now, this photo appears in RCN in June 1965 in the May 2 Oran Park report...

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It's identified as being from Bruce Wells and carries the caption, "Anybody care to change places? Not a good spot for Bruce Stewart to spin, in Energol, with Ron Clarke right behind him, and Weldon, Barnes and Selby looking for a way through." The race report mentions Bruce spinning and that Weldon is in Brian Mayman's car.

But they don't mention this:

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No wonder Bruce spun!

RTe that John Buchelin accident. These days the Supercar drivers would be thanking the team for the rollcage, the HANS device etc. If John was lucky he would have had a lap sash belt and ofcourse been [held] by the FJs bench seat. And no rollcage at all! As for shedding rear guards it probably had about 3 of the original self tappers holding it on. Compared with supercar crashes now when all the doors fly off, as well as the quarters and front guards.
Some modern safety devices ofcourse are very good but it does go to show that sometimes drivers seemed to survive ok with non of it.
Though personally I would not compete without a decent seat and 5 or 6 point belts these days, as well as a decent rollcage, or at least a decent half cage. HANS however I can do without.
T

#1122 Ray Bell

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 11:00

I'm sure he had a full harness (4-point) Lee...

I don't believe I ever saw a tintop race without one.

#1123 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 00:55

I'm sure he had a full harness (4-point) Lee...

I don't believe I ever saw a tintop race without one.

While I never went to a road race meeting before 1971 I knew a few of the early Holdens who lived in my area and at least some where still fitted with lap sash. From memory belts where not mandatory until about then, wheras speedway had used harnesses for quite a while. Which mostly were 3 point, Y d shoulder straps.
I used 2 lap sash in those old stockcars, one each way!
First harness I ever bought was for my road car in 71, a 3 point Tudor Kagnol with magnetic buckle. That is all that was advailable from where I worked.

#1124 seldo

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 05:51

While I never went to a road race meeting before 1971 I knew a few of the early Holdens who lived in my area and at least some where still fitted with lap sash. From memory belts where not mandatory until about then, wheras speedway had used harnesses for quite a while. Which mostly were 3 point, Y d shoulder straps.
I used 2 lap sash in those old stockcars, one each way!
First harness I ever bought was for my road car in 71, a 3 point Tudor Kagnol with magnetic buckle. That is all that was advailable from where I worked.

I was still racing up until 1978 with no more than a lap-sash and no roll bar of any sort.
I had the mother of all prangs at the old Surfers Paradise track going under the flat-out Dunlop Bridge at the end of the straight in 1978 when I broke an axle and lost a back wheel at about 200kph . After 3 barrel-rolls and 5 end-for-ends I walked away from the the Volvo 122S with only a few minor cuts and bruises from the standard fitment 3-point belt, but the the car went straight to the tip, although as a testament to its strength, I was able to open the door and walk away.

Edited by seldo, 06 January 2013 - 06:18.


#1125 DanTra2858

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 07:27

From the early 1960 Britex were putting out a full harness which concisted of 2 shoulder straps & lap belt, I was using them in 1963/64.

#1126 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 13:13

Originally posted by seldo
I was still racing up until 1978 with no more than a lap-sash and no roll bar of any sort.
I had the mother of all prangs at the old Surfers Paradise track going under the flat-out Dunlop Bridge at the end of the straight in 1978 when I broke an axle and lost a back wheel at about 200kph . After 3 barrel-rolls and 5 end-for-ends I walked away from the the Volvo 122S with only a few minor cuts and bruises from the standard fitment 3-point belt, but the the car went straight to the tip, although as a testament to its strength, I was able to open the door and walk away.


I'm quite sure you mean '1968' here, David...

As for lap/sash belts, if people were running them, and you are obviously saying you were, they were in the minority. Most cars racing in, say, 1965 were not originally fitted with belts. So in fitting belts for racing, almost all would go for a 'racing harness' as they were known at the time. Belts were definitely mandatory from at least the very early sixties.

#1127 Paul Hamilton

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 23:14

I'm quite sure you mean '1968' here, David...

As for lap/sash belts, if people were running them, and you are obviously saying you were, they were in the minority. Most cars racing in, say, 1965 were not originally fitted with belts. So in fitting belts for racing, almost all would go for a 'racing harness' as they were known at the time. Belts were definitely mandatory from at least the very early sixties.



Ray, as you say, David's Surfer's crash with the Volvo must have been earlier than 1978 as the car would, by then, have been required to have a roll over bar and full harness. Those requirements had, however, not been in place all that long for production tourers and I doubt that David's memory is as much as 10 years out. There were certainly no harness requirements in place in the early 60's as you suggest.

There were no harness requirements at all for open cars when I started running my MG TC in 1964 and the main reason for fitting the car with a simple lap belt was to hold me in the seat when turning right on some of the bumpy circuits of the day (Hume Weir springs to mind as one major motivation!!). When I bought the Turner at the end of 1967 it was fitted with a lap sash belt which I continued to use until I sold the car at the end of 1971.

The oldest CAMS manual I have is for 1968 which specifies only that a seat belt of unspecified type is required in any 'hard top' car. Open cars get no mention and there were no rollover bar requirements at all until 1969. A requirement was then introduced for rollover bars in open cars and the harness requirement was extended to cover both open and closed cars but still without mention of any particular type or style other than to say 'a harness approved by CAMS'. In 1972 the harness regulations were tightened up a little with requirements that the Australian Standard E35 be met, that open cars have a 4 point shoulder harness and closed cars a least a lap sash belt. The rollover bar regulations were tightened up in 1973 and the harness regulations geared to them with a rollover bar and 4 point shoulder harness required for the first time in all cars (open and closed) in all race events. One of the prime advocates of the progressive gearing up of these equipment standards in the 1969/73 period was, of course, TNF member, Michael Henderson, who had, by then, taken up residence in Australia and encouraged many of our leading competitors to use his 6 point harness equipment which undoubtly saved Niel Allen's life at Lakeside in 1969.

Such basic safety equipment standards are now so well accepted that the relatively recent timing of their introduction is often overlooked. Those of us involved ion the administration of historic motor sport often find it difficult to convince younger people that rollover bars and effective safety harnesses were not widely used until the early 1970's (at least in Europe and Australia) and that the application of current modern standards to older cars simply will not work in many situations.

#1128 GMACKIE

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 23:50

Spot-on, Paul. :up: My lap belt [early '60s] came from an aircraft supplies company, as they were about the only source at the time.

John Halcrow [Holden] had a big off at Hume Weir, when he slid across the bench seat.....he fitted a lap belt after that.



#1129 johnny yuma

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 23:58

What were the differences if the car was actually Road registered,as many series production and even improved production sedans were ?
Perhaps CAMS felt if cars were road registered it absolved them of some of the responsibility of driver safety---particularly if the car had
seat belts already,it would have been a big call to say "No ,you've got to take that out, and fit this race harness".Many cars sold in Australia had seat belts
before they were mandatory.Most HR Holdens to my memory had them,and a good proportion of EHs...although some were after-market,some lap only.

Edited by johnny yuma, 08 January 2013 - 00:02.


#1130 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 00:11

Ray, as you say, David's Surfer's crash with the Volvo must have been earlier than 1978 as the car would, by then, have been required to have a roll over bar and full harness. Those requirements had, however, not been in place all that long for production tourers and I doubt that David's memory is as much as 10 years out. There were certainly no harness requirements in place in the early 60's as you suggest.

There were no harness requirements at all for open cars when I started running my MG TC in 1964 and the main reason for fitting the car with a simple lap belt was to hold me in the seat when turning right on some of the bumpy circuits of the day (Hume Weir springs to mind as one major motivation!!). When I bought the Turner at the end of 1967 it was fitted with a lap sash belt which I continued to use until I sold the car at the end of 1971.

The oldest CAMS manual I have is for 1968 which specifies only that a seat belt of unspecified type is required in any 'hard top' car. Open cars get no mention and there were no rollover bar requirements at all until 1969. A requirement was then introduced for rollover bars in open cars and the harness requirement was extended to cover both open and closed cars but still without mention of any particular type or style other than to say 'a harness approved by CAMS'. In 1972 the harness regulations were tightened up a little with requirements that the Australian Standard E35 be met, that open cars have a 4 point shoulder harness and closed cars a least a lap sash belt. The rollover bar regulations were tightened up in 1973 and the harness regulations geared to them with a rollover bar and 4 point shoulder harness required for the first time in all cars (open and closed) in all race events. One of the prime advocates of the progressive gearing up of these equipment standards in the 1969/73 period was, of course, TNF member, Michael Henderson, who had, by then, taken up residence in Australia and encouraged many of our leading competitors to use his 6 point harness equipment which undoubtly saved Niel Allen's life at Lakeside in 1969.

Such basic safety equipment standards are now so well accepted that the relatively recent timing of their introduction is often overlooked. Those of us involved ion the administration of historic motor sport often find it difficult to convince younger people that rollover bars and effective safety harnesses were not widely used until the early 1970's (at least in Europe and Australia) and that the application of current modern standards to older cars simply will not work in many situations.

I am referring to my 1978 CAMS manual. 'In closed cars which are not required to be fitted with a roll bar or rollcage, a set belt of the full harness type or a lap sash type must be fitted and worn by the driver. Each component must comply with at least with AS E35'

Roll bars were required for race meetings and open speed events except for historic and closed speed events. Go to any speed event even now and most cars do not have any rollover protection, or even a harness. And some of those are seriously quick too.

Though I do remember that cars log booked prior to a certain date did not have to comply, though it is not in the manual. I raced rallycross in 1978 with a few cars that did not have rollcages, and most only had half cages. Also even later than that there was some clause that people could race road registered cars at a certain amount of meetings [2?] without any roll bars. There is Triumph Dolomite here in SA that is logbooked as a GpC and has NEVER had any rollover protection and was raced sporadically for a couple of years. And hillclimbed until the mid 80s.

When HQs first started I built and raced one with a half cage. The chap I sold it too put in a front half as he raced it at the Thunderdome where it was mandatory.

Also the 1978 manual says that a rollbar must be no lower than the top of the drivers helmet.

There is no mention of any mountings for seat belts and some where bloody dreadfull, I have even been guilty of that my self. And recently had a scrutineering problem with a scrutineer that told me the shoulder belts should be mounted lower than my shoulders! They were as recomended by the manufacturer level with my shoulders. He could not understand that the lap belt holds the driver down and the shoulder belts hold you from going forwards.This with a 6 point FIA belt. Eventually it was passed!! After Dale Earnhardts death this has been a topic, his straps were on the rear floor area and probably what killed him as the belts crushed him into the seat.
Speedway Sedans Australia insist on similar too. And that has caused at least 2 broken collar bones to my knowledge as well as a lot of bad bruises.Just with people I know.
As a matter of interest though watching Speedweek on Sunday John Bowe was driving the Ferrari with the belts at least 4" above his shoulders. That is not good either in my book, though I dont know the size of the co driver,, and John is only a little bloke.

#1131 Paul Hamilton

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 03:18

I am referring to my 1978 CAMS manual. 'In closed cars which are not required to be fitted with a roll bar or rollcage, a set belt of the full harness type or a lap sash type must be fitted and worn by the driver. Each component must comply with at least with AS E35'

Roll bars were required for race meetings and open speed events except for historic and closed speed events. Go to any speed event even now and most cars do not have any rollover protection, or even a harness. And some of those are seriously quick too.


Lee, there is a little more said in that 1978 manual than what you have quoted.

The rollover bar exemption you have mentioned as applicable to historics and closed speed events also applied to Group C Touring Cars in open speed events. It does not surprise me to hear that many cars currenntly competing at speed events do not have rollover protecion as club and multi-club events are still exempted as are all road registered cars in open speed events.

The harness requirements you quote which allowed use of a lap sash belt applied only to cars not required to have a rollover bar. Cars required to have a bar or cage also had to be equipped with at least a full harness with two shoulder straps.

Incidentally, the issue of rollover bars is currently under separate discussion in another thread.



#1132 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 21:40

Lee, there is a little more said in that 1978 manual than what you have quoted.

The rollover bar exemption you have mentioned as applicable to historics and closed speed events also applied to Group C Touring Cars in open speed events. It does not surprise me to hear that many cars currenntly competing at speed events do not have rollover protecion as club and multi-club events are still exempted as are all road registered cars in open speed events.

The harness requirements you quote which allowed use of a lap sash belt applied only to cars not required to have a rollover bar. Cars required to have a bar or cage also had to be equipped with at least a full harness with two shoulder straps.

Incidentally, the issue of rollover bars is currently under separate discussion in another thread.

Paul, that is what I quoted. There was closed cars in the late 70s competing without a rollbar or harness. Not many maybe but GpNs in particular did for 10 years more. Not sure of current rules.
As Seldo said when he had his crash.
And all closed cars at an open speed event are not required to have a harness or rollbar in 2013.Registered or not. I do these events and see what is around. And quite possibly will do a hillclimb or 2 without a cage myself this year. As my Improved production Falcon is proving a little expensive and troublesome to do these events with.

#1133 seldo

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:24

I'm quite sure you mean '1968' here, David...

As for lap/sash belts, if people were running them, and you are obviously saying you were, they were in the minority. Most cars racing in, say, 1965 were not originally fitted with belts. So in fitting belts for racing, almost all would go for a 'racing harness' as they were known at the time. Belts were definitely mandatory from at least the very early sixties.

Bah! '68/'78 ....all the same isn't it? :)
Yes, Ray, I certainly did mean '68. And the car was competing as a "closed sports car" or I guess sports-sedan in current terminology.

#1134 johnny yuma

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 22:39

Bah! '68/'78 ....all the same isn't it? :)
Yes, Ray, I certainly did mean '68. And the car was competing as a "closed sports car" or I guess sports-sedan in current terminology.

:lol: Good one seldo---typical Volvo driver !

And I understand "volvo" translates as "I roll !" ....you were warned.

Edited by johnny yuma, 09 January 2013 - 22:43.


#1135 seldo

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 00:42

:lol: Good one seldo---typical Volvo driver !

And I understand "volvo" translates as "I roll !" ....you were warned.

hehe...Yes JY - I did know that. :)

#1136 275 GTB-4

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:43

All this talk of seat belts, harnesses and restraints....I tell ya...I exercised great restraint at the sight of these un-restrained dolly birds in the late 60s....

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#1137 Librules

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:19

Sorry to be pedantic, but actually early 70's as they're riding an XY..............

#1138 275 GTB-4

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 11:34

Sorry to be pedantic, but actually early 70's as they're riding an XY..............


Outstanding contribution Lib...my humble apologies...1970 it is :confused: lets resume normal transmissions?

#1139 GMACKIE

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 21:27

Sorry to be pedantic, but actually early 70's as they're riding an XY..............

Would that be the1970s, then? ;)


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#1140 David Shaw

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 11:18

Yes, 1971 at the earliest. And Librules, don't apologise about the pedantry. If you're right you're right, and you are. :wave:

#1141 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 00:29

Yes, 1971 at the earliest. And Librules, don't apologise about the pedantry. If you're right you're right, and you are. :wave:

Being pedantic, XY was released Sept 70, ran through to early 72. Re Wicki and 40 years of working in the motortrade!

#1142 Librules

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 03:33

Being pedantic, XY was released Sept 70, ran through to early 72. Re Wicki and 40 years of working in the motortrade!


I know how dodgy memory can be (and TNF shows it up from time to time) but I'd trust it over Wiki any day..........................

#1143 275 GTB-4

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:45

Being pedantic, XY was released Sept 70, ran through to early 72. Re Wicki and 40 years of working in the motortrade!


Yeah Lee...thats right...but this was probably a pre-release, PR exercise in the late 60's :lol: :clap:

#1144 Graham Clayton

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 23:42

EK & FE Holdens have been rare on this thread, so it is time to redress the balance:

Barry Cooper's FE rallycross car at Catalina Park:

Posted Image

Tony Seville's EK sedan at Liverpool Speedway:

Posted Image

#1145 Ray Bell

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 23:48

Interesting looking wheels...

Or are they standard wheels with strengthening 'spokes' welded onto them?

#1146 johnny yuma

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 00:06

Looks like strengthening. Love the Gothic numbers,Maltese Cross and authentic rust at bottom of front guard !

#1147 Ray Bell

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 00:48

I personally thought the FB entered at Bathurst looked better...

1963 Armstrong 500, Phil McCumisky and Lex Brailey, covered 115 laps.

#1148 275 GTB-4

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 08:01

EK & FE Holdens have been rare on this thread, so it is time to redress the balance:

Barry Cooper's FE rallycross car at Catalina Park: Fabulous high jump!

Tony Seville's EK sedan at Liverpool Speedway:

Posted Image


So who was Joc? Joe Belling?

#1149 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 22:42

Yeah Lee...thats right...but this was probably a pre-release, PR exercise in the late 60's :lol: :clap:

Having owned a 70 XY I can assure you they were made. Also had a 72. For a somewhat cult car they were only made for about 18 months.

#1150 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 22:48

Interesting looking wheels...

Or are they standard wheels with strengthening 'spokes' welded onto them?

Common Eastern states reinforcing. Widened standard rims with 6 or 8 gussets around them.
I do like the square tube rollcage in that car.
Barry Cooper was very quick in that FE, beat most of the more fancied and so called better suited cars. As someone who raced a HR at rallycross I too got the bullsh*t about the non assets of using a Holden. From the people that I regularly beat!