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FIA doesn't need FOTA or FOM - Mosleys vision


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#1 Motormedia

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 08:31

The latest proposal from Max Mosley, the standard engine, supposed to be used in F1 and WRC among other series, is another step on the way to drive the manufacturers out of motorsports. It seems clear to me that what Mosley wants is independent teams with racing as their core business back into the sport. Given that few manufacturers would want to use an engine of another make, F1 and WRC would lose its attraction. On the other hand, decreased costs and availability of engines, all equal in performance, would attract a lot of independent teams to build cars. Mosleys budget proposal for F1 will also drive the manufacturers out of the sport as they would lose most of the incentive to participate, should the proposal turn to reality. F2 was another step in the direction of resurrecting motorsports of the past, albeit with standard chassies and engines. It's a cheap way to go racing and - the commercial rights are not subjected to Bernie. Somehow, I think Mosley has changed his opinion about the commercial rights. Too much power and control left the building when the rights was sold to Bernie.

It's not that Mosley doesn't want FOTA, he doesn't need them, and with regards to FOM, I believe Mosley sees a future without Bernie too.

Personally, I'd like to see Mosleys vision become reality. What about you?

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#2 Cool Beans

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 08:56

We have seen Mosley's vision for the past decade already. It's not pretty. I cannot believe you are seriously asking for more. :cry:

#3 alfa1

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 08:59

Interesting idea, and would be further proof that Max isnt ready to step down just yet.
He needs another few years to...
1. Put the new 30m budget rules in place.
2. Set up the standard engine
3. Set up the standard monocoque
4. Get some customer entries based on the above
5. Give the new guys the wins and fame by rigging the rules.
6. Kick those old troublemaker 'classic' teams out the door, and spank them with 100 million dollar fines on the way out.

Not sure that I'd actually say that I want to see all that.
F1 in 5 years time is really just a spec series no different than any other.

#4 stevvy1986

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 09:05

Originally posted by Motormedia
Personally, I'd like to see Mosleys vision become reality. What about you?


NO!mosley's vision is basically a world full of spec series, and that's not what i want to see

#5 Broadway

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 09:12

Spec series exists. They are generally less interesting both from a marketing and spectator view. They are no less affected by politics and corruption though. I do not think it would change much. It does not sound as anything that can last though.

#6 krapmeister

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 09:27

And they don't guarantee good racing either.

But please don't make the mistake that Mosley is doing this for us fans or for the good of motorsport - it's all about politics...

#7 Zippel

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 10:17

Originally posted by Broadway
Spec series exists. They are generally less interesting both from a marketing and spectator view.


Exactly. :up:

#8 Motormedia

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 10:25

Originally posted by Broadway
Spec series exists. They are generally less interesting both from a marketing and spectator view.[/B]




Not arguing that. Spec series has lower costs, though. F1 does not have a sustainable business model at the moment and in my view, it is directly related to the manufacturers increased involvement in the last few decades. Costs have been spiralling, turning F1 into a spending contest. I also believe the manufacturers involvement in the higher echeolons of motorsports has had a negative effect on costs in lower series too. A negative trickle down effect, if you will. The fact is that it is more expensive than ever to go motorracing, even on national levels. Mosleys proposal doesn't turn F1 into a spec series, why the budget cap proposal, in that case? What Mosley wants to see is independent teams, with racing as their core business, go racing. I'm all for it.

I have strong views on Mosley, as on FOTA and FOM, but I do share his view in this case. Motorsports has no future if the manufacturers are allowed to outspend each other.

#9 Orin

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 11:53

Mosley's power is being challenged by FOTA, they are researching and drafting regulation changes and presenting them to FIA to be rubber-stamped. I'm sure he'd love to drive the manufacturers out and have a lot of small teams dependent on their income from motor-racing and therefore easy to manipulate. But why would such a series allow Mosley to break from FOM? It would still be called F1 and therefore be FOM's to promote for the next 90 years (or whatever it is). And with a cheaper F1 there would be plenty of money to siphon off, enough for Ecclestone, CVC, the FIA and Mosley.

If it happens I doubt I'll be watching.

#10 Atreiu

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 12:41

Originally posted by beancounter
We have seen Mosley's vision for the past decade already. It's not pretty. I cannot believe you are seriously asking for more. :cry:


:up:

#11 alfa1

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 12:58

While we're on the topic of a hypothetical post-Max era, heres another Q.
We know that no teams have ever appealed an FIA ruling in a real court of law, for fear of 'bringing the sport into disrepute' and getting banned for many years, which would basically mean shutting down a company with hundreds of employees... so, would it be possible for these real law court appeals to then take place in the hypothetical post-Max era?

#12 Bi-Polar Bear

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 13:06

No. The courts would, quite rightly, refuse to be drawn into a private dispute, any more than they would be inclined to entertain a legal action regarding a decision by an umpire or referee in any other sport. The ONLY thing a court MIGHT entertain is an action to enforce or declare invalid a portion of a legal contract between parties - which is what courts do every day.

The above, of course, is totally irrelevant if such a legal action is brought in the Italian courts and involves their beloved Ferrari! :rotfl:

#13 pingu666

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 14:32

we dont need another spec series tbh. if we liked spec series more than 5 people would watch superleage and a1gp.

#14 J

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 14:42

Originally posted by alfa1
While we're on the topic of a hypothetical post-Max era, heres another Q.
We know that no teams have ever appealed an FIA ruling in a real court of law, for fear of 'bringing the sport into disrepute' and getting banned for many years, which would basically mean shutting down a company with hundreds of employees... so, would it be possible for these real law court appeals to then take place in the hypothetical post-Max era?


Of course they can. Minardi did, but withdrew after FIA threated their owners home GP. Teams can take FIA to court, if FIA doesn´t follow it´s own rules - in effect breaks the contract with the competitors. Since it would mean total war with the FIA, this not a route to be taken lightly. We´ll see what happends with the current crises.

-J