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Is Formula One an accessible or esoteric sport?


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#1 Adladdy

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 15:51

Alright guys,

I'm a second year BSc Product Design student.

I'm writing a research project on Formula One and it's accessability to new comers.

Is Formula One an accessible sport to watch? Or do the new rule changes make it more complicated?

How accessible is the technology of Formula one to areas within design/engineering outside of the sport? (see link) BBC WEBSITE ON TECHNOLOGY IN F1

Cheers

Edited by Adladdy, 07 May 2009 - 18:09.


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#2 Stephen W

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 16:01

I'm writing a research project on how Formula One and it's accessability.


How Formula One what?

Is Formula One an accessible sport to watch?


Yes if you are willing to pay the admission price.

Or do the new rule changes make it more complicated?


Most people don't know what the rules were before so what's the point of the question?

How accessible is the technology of Formula one? Does it exist anywhere out of a vehicle?


The same "technology" exists outside of Formula one but not sure what you mean by "out of a vehicle"?

:confused:


#3 fines

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 16:09

Does this belong in TNF? Better move it to Racing Comments, Twinny?

#4 Clatter

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 19:51

Alright guys,

I'm a second year BSc Product Design student.

I'm writing a research project on Formula One and it's accessability to new comers.

Is Formula One an accessible sport to watch? Or do the new rule changes make it more complicated?

How accessible is the technology of Formula one to areas within design/engineering outside of the sport? (see link) BBC WEBSITE ON TECHNOLOGY IN F1

Cheers



F1 can be very easy to watch or very difficult depending on where you live. In Britain we have live TV coverage of all races, but not all are as lucky.

F1 rules have always been complex and there is some confusion when they change, but the same can be said for many sports. Try getting someone to explain the offside rule in football, or the field placements in cricket.

#5 OfficeLinebacker

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 20:24

To answer your question: yes.

In the USA it's most definitely esoteric and inaccessible, about on a par with European soccer.

#6 goffer

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 01:15

Alright guys,

I'm a second year BSc Product Design student.

I'm writing a research project on Formula One and it's accessability to new comers.

Is Formula One an accessible sport to watch? Or do the new rule changes make it more complicated?

How accessible is the technology of Formula one to areas within design/engineering outside of the sport? (see link) BBC WEBSITE ON TECHNOLOGY IN F1

Cheers


Adladdy you pose an interesting query, though it demonstrates a far from well articulated or adequately deconstructed understanding of the complexities of F1. Seeing that you are a design student with an interest in technology / design / engineering I fear that you are at risk of ignoring the considerable role that human behaviours play in the fascination that F1 holds for many of us. Perhaps best that you more accurately define your research project - your 4 sentances above are a bit of a scrambled mix of 'accessibility', 'new comers', 'rules / changes / complications', technology within and beyond F1' - I won't bore you with a rant, but if more clarity is desired PM me or ask for expansion of my life-long addiction for F1.....

#7 jgm

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 07:44

Like most sports F1 can be followed in a superficial way or in great depth. For most people who see it on TV it is just 'driver racing' and the car is a piece of sports equipment to be completely taken for granted like golf clubs or a tennis raquet. Their knowledge of history goes back to last season and no further. For people with a more serious interest the sport is 'motor racing' and to them knowing about the car and its technology and the people behind the technology means a great deal. Motor sport also has a considerable body of racing history behind it now and that is also a source of interest to aficionados. It is a team sport with the driver being just the tip of a very big iceberg with layer upon layer of managers, engineers, technicions, businessmen, politicians, stratagists, spin doctors, press co-ordinators (etc) behind each driver. I would say that the back room story of a sport like F1 is much bigger than the back room story of any other sport. How many people does it take to keep Tiger Woods or Rapael Nadal on the road? Well, probably more than I realise but not 500 specialists I think. That does tend to make F1 rather esoteric as you have to make a real effort if you want to gain some degree of understanding of what is going on. Bear in mind that when a car/driver gains pole position the driver is responsible for about 20% of that achievement, the car and the people behind it for the rest. If you don't know anything about the back room guys and what they do then you don't really understand what is going on and why it is working out the way it is.

#8 DOF_power

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 10:50

Not 'driver racing' jgm, driver circus racertainment.
And I would add luck next to car and the team behind.