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1913 Nyberg Indycar + Rainieri FJ


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#1 rainern

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Posted 24 October 2000 - 16:52

Can anyone confirm if the Nyberg Roadster on the image is the type of car entered in the 1913 Indy 500.
Just reacently learned about the Nyberg Indycar....quite cool...:)

And today I learned about the Rainieri Formula Junior!
Or Raineri...i noticed two different spellings.

What is the correct one?

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Rainer Nyberg


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#2 fines

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Posted 24 October 2000 - 20:05

Well, the Nyberg that ran at Indy in 1913 certainly looked different; I have a picture but it's very small and dark. If you can wait a couple of weeks I may be able to scan and post it. Driven by Harry Endicott it qualified tenth and retired after 23 laps with transmission bother, classified 21st. It had a 6-cylinder 377 cu.in. (6178 cc) engine and was red, carrying the competition number 1!

The Raineri FJ was built by Luigi Raineri. The first examples (1958) were carrying a Fiat engine in the front, in 1960 a rear-engined Lancia-powered car was built.

Best result in 1958: "Giambertino" tenth at Vallelunga. Other drivers included Gino Munaron and Antony Dory (remember from the Fritz d'Orey thread?). Can't confirm any notable results, though...

#3 TonyKaye

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Posted 25 October 2000 - 01:12

If you want to know more about the racing history of Nyberg, there was a one-page aticle in Antique Automobile titled 'Nybergs at Indy' by Jerry Gebby. Sorry, but I don't know the date. AACA will be able to help with that as they publish the journal.
The Sep-Oct 1992 issue of the same magazine contained a two -page article titled 'Nyberg at Speed - the Harry Endicott Story'. This was by Jerry A. Parker.
Wish I had known of your interest a month ago. I could have obtained the latter at Hershey for a buck. No problem.

#4 rainern

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Posted 25 October 2000 - 17:30

Thanks Michael and Tony for your information.

I found the AACA website and they had a similar bulletin board as this there.

So I posted a request for those articles or magazines.

Thanks once again.

Rainer

#5 Felix Muelas

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Posted 25 October 2000 - 20:21

Rainer

From Autosport, December 23 1960, page 882 : Raineri FJ

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:) Felix

#6 John Cross

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Posted 25 October 2000 - 21:15

Rainer,

Amazingly, there is a 'Henry Nyberg Society' which has quite a good web site (history, photos, etc):

http://clubs.hemmings.com/nyberg/

The main web site has quite a few car clubs, etc.

#7 Ray Bell

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Posted 25 October 2000 - 22:19

Some of those early FJrs really turn me on... wire wheels when they were already known to be on the way out.. front engined when F2 Coopers ruled supreme...
Quickly superceded, but a tribute to Johnny Lurani and his idea..

#8 rainern

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Posted 26 October 2000 - 17:34

John;

Yes I am aware of the website.
It was the webmaster of the Henry Nyberg Society who contacted me....:)
And you are right they have some informative pages.

The Antique Automobile Club library will hopefully help me with the other articles.

Thanks for the image Felix..:)
And yes Ray don´t they purposeful those Formula Juniors.

And don´t forget that the Saab Formula Junior was the first monocoque race-car...

http://w1.859.telia......a Junior.html

Rainer

#9 david_martin

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Posted 26 October 2000 - 18:03

Rainer,

Great page on the SAAB formula junior. That picture of Gösta Karlsson certainly redefines understeer (for me an least!!!).

#10 John Cross

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Posted 26 October 2000 - 20:30

Rainer,

Did you deliberately drop in that 'first monocoque race-car' to provoke an argument?!

How about:

Howard Blood's Cornelian at Indianapolis in 1915.
The Voisin at the 1923 French GP.
Alec Issigonis' and Laurie Bond's sprint specials of the 1930s & 1940s.
Tom Killeen's designs of the early 1950s.
The D-Type Jaguar of 1954-57.
The BRM P25 of 1955-57.

Nevertheless, the FJ Saab was certainly different - a real 'motor racing maverick'! Incidentally, Hodges says that it had a "stressed-skin sheet metal and glass fibre chassis/body" rather than a pure aluminium monocoque. It also had a beam rear axle (presumably from a 96). One of the very few front wheel drive racing cars, along with the DB-Panhard. I can't help thinking it would have been more successful if they had dropped the engine/transaxle behind the driver, though...[p][Edited by John Cross on 10-26-2000]

#11 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 October 2000 - 20:51

Quit mucking around... just do this:

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Now we can all share just that little more easily...
And down to the serious stuff... 104 hp was pretty good horsepower for that category, especially in the 1000cc class.
Ah, yes, you forgot the 1000cc class! There was a slightly lower minimum weight for cars under the litre. I think, in fact, that the original limit had been 1000cc, but it was decided there was a lot of good engines just over that limit, so 1100cc was allowed with a slightly higher minimum weight.

#12 rainern

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Posted 26 October 2000 - 21:32

Well, if someone claims a "first" there will always be a debate over it...:)

But they (Saab) at least were ahead of Chapman..:)

And later the engine was actually put behind the driver...
See rally-ace Tom Trana in a Formula 4.

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Rainer

#13 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 October 2000 - 21:47

This one won some local races, didn't it?