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Australasia's most valuable Austin Seven


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#1 geebeenz

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 09:23

Having just bought a model of Peter Brock's first car an Austin Seven chassis I wondered what would be Australasia's most valuable Austin Seven. For many New Zealanders the McLaren Ulster must be tops but in a country where people will pay over a million dollars for a Brock Torana what would they pay for the Brock Austin Seven. The Brock A30 and FX Holden are replicas so that puts a lot of value on Brock's first car. The Waite Austin 7 winner of the first Australian Grand Prix is I understand also a replica so that also doesn't count. On the world scene only the Rubber Duck is a works car so to my way of thinking that has to be the most valuable but is it more significant to Austrasian's than the Brock and McLaren cars.

Edited by geebeenz, 04 September 2009 - 18:36.


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#2 David Shaw

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 10:45

Having just bought a model of Peter Brock's first car an Austin Seven chassis I wondered what would be Australasia's most valuable Austin Seven. For many New Zealanders the McLaren Aulster must be tops but in a country where people will pay over a million dollars for a Brock Torana what would they pay for the Brock Austin Seven. The Brock A30 and FX Holden are replicas so that puts a lot of value on Brock's first car. The Waite Austin 7 winner of the first Australian Grand Prix is I understand also a replica so that also doesn't count. On the world scene only the Rubber Duck is a works car so to my way of thinking that has to be the most valuable but is it more significant to Austrasian's than the Brock and McLaren cars.


But it was really just a paddock hack.


#3 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 13:00

It did, however, share some important features with the car of that great Austin 7 competitor Ken McKinney's car as run at the 1933 Frankston hillclimb...

No bodywork, just one seat, two main bearings and an optimistic view of what the crankshaft suspended thereby could tolerate.

#4 David McKinney

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 13:43

It would have to be the ex-works Dutch Clog single-seater - the car that for some reason got to be called Rubber Duck in NZ
I believe it's at present in Australia (and visited the UK two or three years ago)

#5 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 04:43

For a car really so unsuited for motor racing there is still one hell of a lot racing.
Those little cranks are about the size of a bent paperclip and made from very fragile material. Though the fast ones are using aftermarket cranks and Renault rods

#6 cooper997

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 05:04

The Brock Austin Seven was 'lost' for many years. But in Austin Seven circles they knew where it was. There was 50000 reasons why it changed hands after Peter's untimely death. A Melbourne gearbox specialist had it. Then a brake specialist sponsored the purchase for the Brock Foundation. It was on display in it's 'as found' condition at the 2006 Brock Big Day Out at Hurstbridge. Personally that's how it should have stayed.

Stephen

#7 geebeenz

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 08:13

For a car really so unsuited for motor racing there is still one hell of a lot racing.
Those little cranks are about the size of a bent paperclip and made from very fragile material. Though the fast ones are using aftermarket cranks and Renault rods


They are still active in Auckland New Zealand. We managed 9 at a club hillclimb in 2006


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