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#1 frogeye59

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 17:44


Hi,

Going to Cornwall for the first time in the half term week in October.

Any recommendations ?? bookshops, model shops, museums, motorsport or aviation related ...... ??

Cheers

David

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#2 Edington Mains

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 20:00

Hi,

Going to Cornwall for the first time in the half term week in October.

Any recommendations ?? bookshops, model shops, museums, motorsport or aviation related ...... ??

Cheers

David


Theres not a lot of Motorsport related stuff down there, there is, or was, some semblance of a track in north Cornwall..

Aviation wise.. you should go down to Helston.. RNAS Culdrose has a reasonable viewing area... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culdrose

theres a theme park down there too called Flambards that has a few old Aircraft from Culdrose in its grounds that you can get close to...

then head south towards the Lizard point theres an old airfield called Preddanack on the right just after the Mullion turning.. if you are there on the right day you can wonder round the old place.. its left almost untouched, and there are a few old things scattered around there too (i know i used to do cross country training around that area...)
http://en.wikipedia....annack_Airfield

then you should (if things in the sky interest you) go to Goonhilly Downs Earth station.. before they close it down...
http://www.goonhilly.bt.com/
http://en.wikipedia....e_Earth_Station

most of all.. Enjoy my homeland!

Edited by Edington Mains, 14 September 2009 - 20:02.


#3 ghinzani

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 01:30

You'm got a visa to get in 'ere then, me ansome?

#4 Leigh Trevail

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 08:21

Peter Tutthill who has written several book on motor sport (including the Davidstowe Circuit previously mentioned) is involved with a small museum in Wadebridge, it may be worthwhile paying it a visit!


#5 Stephen W

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 08:38

Peter Tutthill who has written several book on motor sport (including the Davidstowe Circuit previously mentioned) is involved with a small museum in Wadebridge, it may be worthwhile paying it a visit!


I would suggest a visit to the Davidstow Circuit which isn't that far from Tintagel. In Tintagel there is a very nice Model Shop where I managed to pick up a copy of the Tutthill Davidstow book as well as a book on Kieft racing cars.

:wave:



#6 PMac

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 10:48

If you're travelling down the hideous A303 and wish to break your journey, I would recommend a visit to the Haynes Motor Museum at Sparkford.

http://www.haynesmot...home/index.html

Enjoy your trip.

Peter

#7 David Force

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 11:32

Take a break from motor sport for a day and visit the Eden Project, it is amazing

:cool:

#8 Dutchy

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 13:30

There's the remains of Tregwainton hill climb, on National Trust land I believe


#9 jimjimjeroo

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 14:21

These guys are based just out side newquay!

http://adrenalinemotorsport.co.uk/

you may wanna check this out too, runs quite regularly!

http://camelvale.homestead.com/

Theres a model railway museum in Mevagissey also!

#10 frogeye59

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 18:17

Wow !! thanks for all the suggestions.

Looks like we're going to be busy.

I'd thought about Davidstow, but is it not just a very big dairy now ??

Anyone else have a view on the Eden project as I know a number of folk who have been, 50% say they were out in 15 minutes and 50% say what a great day............ strange for it to divide opinion quite as much.

Are any of the mine museums worth a look ??

Is the Bodmin steam railway worth a visit, for someone used to the north yorks and severn valley ?.

Ghinzani, no visa I'm afraid, will have to bribe the boarder guards with black country pork stratchings, go lovely with cyder.

Again thanks for the suggestions, any more much appreciated.

:up: :up:

#11 RS2000

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 20:21

Walking distance from the Eden Project (although maybe not by road) is the Tregrehan hill climb (and garden). Too late for any Cornish speed event this year at any venue of course.

Edited by RS2000, 15 September 2009 - 20:23.


#12 Vitesse2

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 20:42

You'm got a visa to get in 'ere then, me ansome?

In Deb'n zey do zay as yer needz munny fer ter leave Cornwall. Bein' as tiz free t'get to Saltash over yon Tamar Bridge. But they charges ter get out agin .... an' all that munny goes ter they buggers in Plymouth! 'Tain't fair moi luvver!!

#13 Nick Wa

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 02:29

The Last RAF Aircraft in Cornwall 2009

Shackleton WL 795 is on guard at RAF St Mawgan Cornwall and The " Growler " is open for visitors every Sunday morning, if you wish to visit more info from John on 01726 66346.

For pictures visit Pprune.org

#14 ghinzani

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 03:22

The Last RAF Aircraft in Cornwall 2009

Shackleton WL 795 is on guard at RAF St Mawgan Cornwall and The " Growler " is open for visitors every Sunday morning, if you wish to visit more info from John on 01726 66346.

For pictures visit Pprune.org


Ah yes my ex-brother-in-law used to tinker round with that on a regular basis, the people who upkeep her are a dedicated lot and no mistake.


#15 Stephen W

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 07:56

I'd thought about Davidstow, but is it not just a very big dairy now ??


The old race circuit is BEHIND the dairy. The 'B' road bisects one end and you can park on the old circuit. I would suggest that you either purchase the book or download a circuit diagram prior to your trip so you can work out where everything used to be.

Oh and make sure you have a stout pair of boots to hand as the old runway is in a bit of a state.

:wave:

#16 cdrewett

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 09:13

I've been to Eden a few times and found it fascinating but you have to be into plants and gardens. Also well worth a visit is the huge steam pumping engine at Pool near Redruth. The maritime museum at Falmouth is also great to visit.
Chris

Edited by cdrewett, 16 September 2009 - 09:14.


#17 high speed diesel

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 09:17


If it's mining you are interested in also, then either visit Geevor Tin mining museum at Pendeen, near Lands End or the Clay Country Park in St Austell, both well worth a visit, Davidstow is still all there, but full of pot holes, Peter Tuthull is in the process of writing his next book about Trengwainton.

And if you are travelling back on Sunday the 4th, then the NHCA (bikes) have our last event of the year at Hartland Quay in Devon. There is even a pub right by the start line. Brilliant venue clinging to the cliffs.

#18 high speed diesel

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 09:19

Oh and if the Eden project ever closed, we could have a week long hill climb festival there.

#19 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 19:38

Hasn't John George (BTCC driver) bought an airport in Cornwall (maybe ex-RAF) and is trying to get planning permission to turn the perimeter road into a race circuit?
I don't know much more than that (I can find out though) but from what I've been told it's quite a serious plan and the idea is to have a BTCC race there (hopefully Alan Gow doesn't read this!!).

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#20 high speed diesel

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 20:29

He owns Perrenporth airfield, or Trevellis as it was known, just above Blue Hills trials hill. Last used for motor sport back in the late eighties when the Tour of Cornwall ran a stage there, I remember seeing Malcolm Wilson in a 6R4 running car number zero.

I would be surprised if the nimbys allowed him to even start his engine there, let alone run an event, hope so though, but we can't even get a new speedway track down here either.

#21 retriever

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 20:30

If you miss out on the Haynes museum on the A303, take a diversion to nearby Yeovilton and the FAA Museum alongside HMS Heron


#22 ghinzani

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 20:47

Hasn't John George (BTCC driver) bought an airport in Cornwall (maybe ex-RAF) and is trying to get planning permission to turn the perimeter road into a race circuit?
I don't know much more than that (I can find out though) but from what I've been told it's quite a serious plan and the idea is to have a BTCC race there (hopefully Alan Gow doesn't read this!!).



Think thats story was more of an April fools type thing that the local papers bought. Then again the West Briton will generally print whatever you tell them , eh Andy?

#23 high speed diesel

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 06:16

Just read an article in the Cornish Guardian and it seems there is an avaition museum at Davidstow now, not sure how big it is though.

Steve (ghinzani), I bumped into Jeremy Jackson at Wiscombe on Sunday, and he tells me you are in his next book

#24 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 19:40

Think thats story was more of an April fools type thing that the local papers bought. Then again the West Briton will generally print whatever you tell them , eh Andy?


Maybe, but I was told that by a very reliable source.  ;)

#25 elansprint72

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 21:34

Don't miss Philp's pastie shop, Hayle, best in Cornwall.



#26 ghinzani

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 12:50

Don't miss Philp's pastie shop, Hayle, best in Cornwall.



Funnily enough it was one of the two major factors that made me buy a flat opposite it in 1997, the pasty shop and the pub next door. You need to have priorities in life...

#27 Leigh Trevail

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 18:16

Frogeye!........You could always stay in the house where Prince Chula lived......


http://www.tredethyhouse.com/

#28 MCS

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 20:58

Don't miss Philp's pastie shop, Hayle, best in Cornwall.


Nonsense. Go to Sarah's Pasty Shop in Looe. :clap:


#29 elansprint72

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 23:17

Nonsense. Go to Sarah's Pasty Shop in Looe. :clap:


Of course, if you think that Looe is in Kernow....

Ghinzani I salute you.  ;)

#30 ghinzani

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 12:37

Nonsense. Go to Sarah's Pasty Shop in Looe. :clap:



Annes pasty shop down on the Lizard is right up there too, bought a box to take home and freeze last time I was there, very nice.

Of course none can quite reach the heights of Mothers, but they are'nt generally available to the public :p

#31 ghinzani

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 12:42

Ghinzani I salute you. ;)



With The Royal Standard (great fry-up) next door and my paper delivered I rarely had to travel more than 50 yards during my weeks off-shift down there.

#32 jimjimjeroo

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 15:45

Hasn't John George (BTCC driver) bought an airport in Cornwall (maybe ex-RAF) and is trying to get planning permission to turn the perimeter road into a race circuit?
I don't know much more than that (I can find out though) but from what I've been told it's quite a serious plan and the idea is to have a BTCC race there (hopefully Alan Gow doesn't read this!!).


The chap who owns Jag Communications owns there air field, he is fighting off bankruptcy at the mo!


#33 high speed diesel

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 19:14

I thought John George had sold JAG, did hear they were in trouble though.

While we are on the pasty thread, Pearce's in St Austell, cooked or frozen take some beating, mother's excluded of course.

http://www.perranpor.../JAG_Comms.aspx


#34 McTaff

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 20:20

Have a bite to eat in Padstow at Rick Stein's Bistro, it's nice food and reasonable. It's not the posh one!

#35 Edington Mains

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 07:46

Annes pasty shop down on the Lizard is right up there too, bought a box to take home and freeze last time I was there, very nice.

Of course none can quite reach the heights of Mothers, but they aren't generally available to the public :p


(Annes on the Lizard) It is indeed, (one of my locals too) and theres a superb on on Coinagehall Street in Helston... they make them in the shop window, its great to watch.
I do feel that you have to go past Bodmin before you get into real Pasty country....

And which leads me onto...

why do bakery's that are not in Cornwall, make pasty's that are not to the correct recipe, and/or shape... but insist on calling them 'Cornish Pasties'
And why do the fools that serve them in a shop that's not in Cornwall get the hump with you when you politely correct them of the fact that 'Its not a Cornish Pasty'.. 'its just a Pasty'...
'A Cornish pasty is Handmade to a certain recipe the other side of Bodmin Moor.. anything else is just a poor replica...'

Like a 250GTO body on a Datsun 260Z.. looks good, goes down ok... but it aint the real thing..

(Rant Over)


Have a bite to eat in Padstow at Rick Stein's Bistro, it's nice food and reasonable. It's not the posh one!


have dined in both. the Bistro is OK... it has to keep its prices down otherwise it wouldn't get any customers...
the main restaurant however I feel is just trading on the name, people go there to say 'I have eaten at.....' (I know I did!!... but then again my wife is a Chef so she wanted to see if all was true)
food was very good in both but I still believe there's a certain 'chip on the shoulder' feeling about the plaice!

#36 RCH

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 08:08

Not quite sure what Cornish Pasties have to do with this forum but, what the hell!

IIRC the pastie (pasty everywhere else in the world) was invented to provide Cornish tin miners with a full meal to be eaten underground. Stands to reason therefore that wherever there was a tin mine in Cornwall there was a Cornish Pastie! So none of this nonsense about west of Bodmin please. There were tin mines in Devon too....

BTW my vote goes to the shop in Hayle.

Edited to ask, how can you have Irish or New Zealand Cheddar? Not to mention what is the correct sequence for a cream tea?

Edited by RCH, 20 September 2009 - 08:10.


#37 Vitesse2

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 17:29

Neither Cornish pasties nor Cheddar cheese have what is called Protected Geographical Indicator Status. If they did, then you could only make them to particular recipes within the specified areas - as an example, thanks to a 2008 EU ruling, Melton Mowbray pork pies can now only be made in or around the town of Melton Mowbray. Pork Farms used to make theirs in Calne in Wiltshire, but had to stop when the ruling came in. Similarly, Wensleydale cheese can only be made in Wensleydale in Yorkshire.

These rulings are similar to the ones which say you can only call sparkling wine "champagne" if it comes from the Champagne region of France or fortified wine "sherry" if it comes from Jerez.

#38 RTH

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 17:51

Ooooooh........ a real Cornish Pastie !!! :up:

#39 Edington Mains

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 18:09

Yea.. apparently its still ongoing, I'm not usually a fan of Brussels Beaurocrates , but this one has my backing

In 2002, the Cornish Pasty Association, the trade organisation for pasty making in Cornwall, submitted an application to the UK government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) to obtain Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status for the Cornish pasty. DEFRA has confirmed that it is backing the application and will be sending it to the European Commission for final approval.
If PGI status is granted to the Cornish pasty (the same status that has been granted to Champagne, Parma Ham, Stilton Cheese, Arbroath Smokies, Cornish Clotted Cream, and many other items of regional produce) it would mean only pasty makers based in Cornwall who make in a traditional manner and follow a traditional recipe will be able to label their products as Cornish pasties.


But I think you missed my point... A pasty is a pasty.. its folded over pastry with a filling, thus you can get a cheese and onion pasty..
what I'm getting at is Northern shops (I live up here now) sell savories with a multitude of different fillings and label them 'Cornish Pasty''s.. and get the hump when you ask for a pasty.. (Sketch Time!)

"Hello, Can I have a pasty please"

"A Cornish Pasty?"

"no one of those half moon shaped bits of pastry with a filling that is unknown to man"

"Yes sir, those are Cornish Pasty's"

"Oh, Great, Were they made in Kernow by the hands of the ancestors of tin miners who have had the ancient recipe passed down to them from generation to generation and so perpetuating the greatest export that the fine Celtic county has had since the demise of Tin and China Clay?... or are they a locally massed produced concoction of Mashed potato and Corned beef in a puff pastry shape masquerading under the misnomer 'Cornish Pasty? "

"er!"


A Cornish Pasty however is made to a certain recipe and made locally, with ingredients that are somewhat loyal to the original
... just the right amount of beef, sliced potato, turnip and onion and the meat should be beef, preferably 'Skirt beef' from around the neck of the beast, as this was bits that were left after the animal was divided up!

And i have had a True Cornish Pasty (Tiddie Hoddie).. it had Jam at the lower end of the ridge as a sweet!


While there are no completely standard pasty ingredients, the traditional recipe includes diced or sliced steak, finely sliced onion, and potato. Other common ingredients include Swede (rutabaga, called yellow turnip in Devon and Cornwall) and sometimes parsley. The use of any carrot in a Cornish pasty is frowned upon by purists, and is rarely found in commercially made pasties in Cornwall. Traditionally skirt steak is used, although sometimes other cuts can be found. Pasties made with ground beef or beef mince are also common and are often sold alongside steak pasties as a cheaper alternative. While meat is a common ingredient in modern pasty recipes, it was a luxury for many 19th century Cornish miners, so traditional pasties usually include many more vegetables than meat.

Pasty ingredients are usually seasoned with salt and pepper, depending on individual taste.

Today pasty contents vary, especially outside Cornwall. Common fillings include beef steak and stilton, chicken and ham, cheese and vegetable and even turkey and stuffing. Other speciality pasties include breakfast and vegetarian pasties. Pasty crust recipes also vary, but traditional recipes call for a tough (not flaky) crust, which could withstand being held and bumped in the Cornish tin mines. Modern pasties almost always use a short (or pastry) crust. There is a great deal of debate among pasty makers about the proper traditional ingredients and recipes for a pasty, specifically the mixture of vegetables and crimping of the crust. The crimping debate is contested even in Cornwall itself, with some advocating a side crimp while others maintain that a top crimp is more authentic.

It has been said that the difference between Devon pasties and Cornish pasties is that the Devon pasty has a crimped crust running along the top of the pasty and is oval in shape, whereas the Cornish pasty is semicircular with a thicker crust running along the curved edge of the pasty, however it is more probable that the choice between top and side crimp versions is highly dependent on the whim of the cook.


Anyway... is there some motorsport on here somewhere?



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#40 Leigh Trevail

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 07:28

All this about an original recipe is complete grunt. The miner's/farmer's/fisherman's wife or mother would use what was available or affordable at any given time. Some pasties were in two halves with meat & potato at one end and cooked fruit at the other. The pastry was supposed to be able to survive being dropped down a mineshaft, so was probably inedible anyway. Some have the pastry crimped on the top some on the side, personally I prefer the former, whilst some may go for the latter!




#41 Tim Murray

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 07:40

I thought that the whole point of the thick crimped edge was as a handle for the miner to hold in his dirty hands while he ate the rest. He'd then throw away the bit he'd been holding. It seems to me that this would be much more difficult to do with a top-crimped pasty.

#42 MCS

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 08:11

...Some pasties were in two halves with meat & potato at one end and cooked fruit at the other...


That would be a Bedfordshire Clanger then :lol:

...although, in fairness, sometimes a suet as opposed to a pastry case...


#43 Stephen W

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 08:23

why do bakery's that are not in Cornwall, make pasty's that are not to the correct recipe, and/or shape... but insist on calling them 'Cornish Pasties'
And why do the fools that serve them in a shop that's not in Cornwall get the hump with you when you politely correct them of the fact that 'Its not a Cornish Pasty'.. 'its just a Pasty'...
'A Cornish pasty is Handmade to a certain recipe the other side of Bodmin Moor.. anything else is just a poor replica...'


... and there was me thinking the pasty was a Roman concoction! Funny old world!

 ;)

#44 ghinzani

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 08:47

I thought that the whole point of the thick crimped edge was as a handle for the miner to hold in his dirty hands while he ate the rest. He'd then throw away the bit he'd been holding. It seems to me that this would be much more difficult to do with a top-crimped pasty.



Not like us to throw away good food mind...

#45 high speed diesel

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 11:15

Looks like the pasty is more a talking point than Cornish motorsport, but we did have an F1 race down here in the 50's at Davidstow and road races at St Eval in the 60's and Falmouth in the 30's.

It's nearly lunch time, think I have a Nile's pasty today, shop just down the road.

#46 elansprint72

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 21:35

Looks like the pasty is more a talking point than Cornish motorsport, but we did have an F1 race down here in the 50's at Davidstow and road races at St Eval in the 60's and Falmouth in the 30's.

It's nearly lunch time, think I have a Nile's pasty today, shop just down the road.


Well, having derailed this thread by mentioning pasties (pasty's???? take a hundred lines Edington). Can I now mention Davidstowe Cheese?



Ducks for cover. Damn, now I've mentioned duck. :stoned:

#47 Edington Mains

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 05:27

Well, having derailed this thread by mentioning pasties (pasty's???? take a hundred lines Edington). Can I now mention Davidstowe Cheese?



Ducks for cover. Damn, now I've mentioned duck. :stoned:

Ah.. Damm my poor grammar..
And it was cheese that inspired my little sketch further up!
"shut that bloody bazookie up"

anyway, just remembered this was about motorsport, and I remembered that there's a 'grasstrack' meeting once a fortnight or so on the land next to the old Telstar cafe on Goonhilly Downs.. It was a run what you brought affair, a chance for some of the local lads to tear about in cars without much risk to others, you'd always get the ones that prepped their cars properly and take it far to seriously with the paint jobs, and then you'd get a raft of Volvo 340's and Cavalier's...
But the ones with th Mk3 Escorts were the serious ones...

Good fun and a pleasant relaxed atmosphere in the evening..

#48 Macca

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Posted 23 September 2009 - 13:42

And getting even further back on-topic, here's a view going along the back straight towards Altarnun Corner (to drive the whole circuit, even when the microlights aren't flying, you'll need a 4-w-d):

Posted Image

Paul M

#49 high speed diesel

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Posted 23 September 2009 - 20:03

Used to "run in" the hillclimb bikes on that runway every March, weaving between the pot holes until it got too bad. The police used to turn up and try and remove us, but as we were on tarmac and it was common land, they couldn't do a thing, so they just watched instead.