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Mark Donohue celebration at Road America July, 2010


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#51 B Squared

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 09:53

Competition Press & Autoweek September 22, 1973:

The Brazilian newspapers are saying that Emerson Fittipaldi will drive for the Brabham F/1 team next year. But rumors from Switzerland say that Marlboro of Europe will approach Roger Penske with the idea of a red -and-white sponsored, Penske-run, 2-car Eagle F/1 team for next season. The rumored drivers? Donohue and Fittipaldi.

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#52 B Squared

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 15:43

From a Goodyear ad at Indianapolis in 1971 after Mark lost the pole position to McLaren's Peter Revson. He still manages to flash that famous smile. Quite a racing "who's who" mixed in with the cars and drivers. Brian

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#53 ZOOOM

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 18:32

From a Goodyear ad at Indianapolis in 1971 after Mark lost the pole position to McLaren's Peter Revson. He still manages to flash that famous smile. Quite a racing "who's who" mixed in with the cars and drivers. Brian

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I know the guy who owns that McLaren today. It is being restored to that livery and condition in Indy, now
He has been invited to show it and drive it for the 2011 Indy show.
ZOOOM

#54 RA Historian

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 18:38

I know the guy who owns that McLaren today.
ZOOOM

Don Devine.

Tom

#55 ZOOOM

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 21:24

Thomas.... Is there anything you DON'T know???? :lol:
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#56 RA Historian

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 22:14

Thomas.... Is there anything you DON'T know???? :lol:
ZOOOM

Yes. The secret of life, the key to untold wealth, why I wasn't born to incredibly rich parents so I could spend my life as a playboy, why I continue to live up here in frigid Wisconsin enduring snow and cold, and why that girl back in 1966 didn't, well, let's not go there.

Tom

#57 B Squared

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 10:06

In this Edwin Ingalls photo, Mark and Bobby Unser look a bit more introspective while Peter Revson seems well aware, and rightfully proud, of what he has pulled off. Brian

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#58 B Squared

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 09:52

Competition Press & Autoweek June 16, 1973 Late News:

First actual flex of USAC muscle on driver interchange: USAC has overruled Pocono management and refused Mark Donohue's entry in the Schaefer 500. Donohue does not hold a USAC license; Pocono is not a full international event. Says USAC's Bill Smyth, this will be "our policy until other forms of domestic driver interchange can be worked out."

Roger Penske has purchased Michigan International Speedway and will take possession June 14. Will Penske now refuse any USAC-sanctioned race at the track because of USAC's rejection of Mark Donohue's Pocono entry?

#59 AlMark

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 16:03

Competition Press & Autoweek June 16, 1973 Late News:

First actual flex of USAC muscle on driver interchange: USAC has overruled Pocono management and refused Mark Donohue's entry in the Schaefer 500. Donohue does not hold a USAC license; Pocono is not a full international event. Says USAC's Bill Smyth, this will be "our policy until other forms of domestic driver interchange can be worked out."

Roger Penske has purchased Michigan International Speedway and will take possession June 14. Will Penske now refuse any USAC-sanctioned race at the track because of USAC's rejection of Mark Donohue's Pocono entry?


Brian,

Did you ever hear of Doug Switz? After he sold off his Donohue collection a few years ago I proclaimed myself the biggest Donohue fan in the world, Now I must defer to you. However I still believe I have the largest and best collection of 1/43rd scale models documenting Mark's career. And still working on it.

Gil

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#60 B Squared

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 14:42

Brian,

Did you ever hear of Doug Switz? After he sold off his Donohue collection a few years ago I proclaimed myself the biggest Donohue fan in the world, Now I must defer to you. However I still believe I have the largest and best collection of 1/43rd scale models documenting Mark's career. And still working on it.

Gil


Gil - What an incredibly generous and kind thing to write. As well thought of as Mark was, and still is - I'm sure there are many out there who have the same warm remembrances of this fine man and racer. It would be nice if you could post photos of some of your collectables in regards to Mark on this thread. With apologies, I haven't heard of Doug Switz.

Michael Argetsinger's incredible research and his hard work in developing Technical Excellence At Speed and along the way, inviting me to be a part of the book launch in April, 2009 is what re-awakened my awareness of Mark and his influences on me as a youth. The crowd at Watkins Glen last year, including so many family members, friends and teammates is testament to the fact that I am only a miniscule part of Mark Donohue's fan base. While at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Tuesday Jan. 12, I was buying some photos of Mark. Many were printed up due to the demand. As Sherry, who was working the shop, stated, "Mark was always so well thought of and one of our most popular winners. With this new book about him, we see a big increase in demand for things about him." Thanks again, Brian

#61 AlMark

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 22:06

Gil - .......... - I'm sure there are many out there who have the same warm remembrances of this fine man and racer. It would be nice if you could post photos of some of your collectables in regards to Mark on this thread. .............


Brian,

I have been tempted to do so, but I don't think most members would want to turn this thread into a model forum. However, this is one of my unique models, Jack Griffith's Cobra at VIR. If requested, I will link more.

Gil

http://public.fotki....220_edited.html

http://public.fotki....ited.html#media

http://public.fotki....ited.html#media




#62 jj2728

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 22:28

Brian,

I have been tempted to do so, but I don't think most members would want to turn this thread into a model forum. However, this is one of my unique models, Jack Griffith's Cobra at VIR. If requested, I will link more.

Gil

http://public.fotki....220_edited.html

http://public.fotki....ited.html#media

http://public.fotki....ited.html#media


Very nice collection......FYI in 1/43 I have the MINICHAMPS 1973 Porsche 917/30 and the SPARK 1968 Mclaren M6B.

Edited by jj2728, 24 January 2010 - 13:58.


#63 jj2728

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 13:13

Mid-Ohio 1973
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#64 B Squared

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 13:52

Nice collection of scale models Gil. I was able to scroll through all 73) photos of Mark's various cars. Thanks, Brian

From Competition Press & Autoweek - July 24, 1971:

Radios Popular 'Options' For USAC Cars

Mt. Pocono, Pa. July 3 - Marconi should have been here, or someone from history past who contributed to the progress of communications as auto racing's open-wheeled set joined the ether age in earnest in today's running of the Schaefer 500.

Just a few weeks ago Al Unser and Joe Leonard raised the eyebrows at Indianapolis by installing - and using - one-way radio sets in their racing machines.

The fact that Unser won his second straight Indy 500 may have been the clincher in the argument but when the USAC Marlboro Championship group assembled for practice at Pocono International Raceway, three other teams had joined the "talking" set.

Bobby Unser was the first to appear with the radio setup - a two-way job that connected Bobby with car owner - team manager Dan Gurney stationed out in the boonies watching Bobby's acts through the turns.

"Dan helped me out a lot by telling me what I was doing going through the corners," said Bobby. "He figured out the third turn and between us we got the second one down but we never could quite figure the first one."

There was a two-way conversation in practice only. Come this morning, it was a one-way deal with Bobby doing the talking and Gurney doing the listening.

"About the time he asks me a question and I came to a corner, I don't intend to worry about answering," said Bobby. "Can you imagine what would have happened about the time I said, 'what did you say?' then started through a turn? If you can't, I can."

Johnny Rutherford shipped his helmet off to California to have a "bone" mike installed that utilized his skull as a transmitter, aerial and all.

"But it worked too well," commented Rutherford. "The mike picked up so much outside noise I had to have a conventional one built in the helmet like the other guys use."

Mark Donohue went the old-fashioned route with his two-way setup, attaching a regular mike to the outside of his helmet with the little plastic job reaching across the mouth.

By race time this morning, however, his was one-way too. "It is sort of a switch," he laughed when reminded he would be doing most of the talking and owner Roger Penske the listening. "But it works quite nicely this way."

No one would answer the query about a vote being taken on a one-way or a two-way conversation piece - but pit side reports had Penske being out-voted about seven to one.

All five drivers used their radios in the race itself and no one got their channels mixed up, which isn't a bit like the usual racing luck.

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In this uncredited photo, you can see the system Mark and Mr. Penske used for this race.



#65 B Squared

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 10:25

Mark Donohue and Roger Penske celebrating their first IndyCar win at Pocono in 1971.

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#66 AlMark

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 15:31

........

Michael Argetsinger's incredible research and his hard work in developing Technical Excellence At Speed and along the way, inviting me to be a part of the book launch in April, 2009 is what re-awakened my awareness of Mark and his influences on me as a youth. ....... Brian


Brian and all:

Reference page 44 of "The Book" which gives an account of Mark co-driving a Renault Dauphine with Ron Grable in the Marlboro 12 Hours on August 18, 1963. Is it beyound the ream of possibility that Michael or anyone else has come up photos of this car?
Gil

Edited by AlMark, 26 January 2010 - 15:41.


#67 RA Historian

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 16:20

Reference page 44 of "The Book" which gives an account of Mark co-driving a Renault Dauphine with Ron Grable in the Marlboro 12 Hours on August 18, 1983.

Errr, I imagine that you mean 1963.

#68 B Squared

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 14:20

Brian and all:

Reference page 44 of "The Book" which gives an account of Mark co-driving a Renault Dauphine with Ron Grable in the Marlboro 12 Hours on August 18, 1963. Is it beyound the ream of possibility that Michael or anyone else has come up photos of this car?
Gil


I have not seen the photos that Michael has to choose from...I know that I'm unable to help you with this request. I will keep an eye out for a picture of this car for you. Brian



#69 B Squared

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 13:14

jj2728 - thanks for posting the shot of Mark in the Mid-Ohio pit lane. Anything else from that weekend with Team Penske?

The milk filled glass in the photos below was put out by Sunoco in 1973 to honor Mark and Team Penske for their victory in the 1972 Indianapolis 500. Mark Donohue is in yellow print below the other winners of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing. Brian

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#70 JacnGille

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 01:31

The milk filled glass in the photos below was put out by Sunoco in 1973 to honor Mark and Team Penske for their victory in the 1972 Indianapolis 500. Mark Donohue is in yellow print below the other winners of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing. Brian


I have a glass just like that one. Bought it on ebay several years ago.


#71 B Squared

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 12:12

From Competition Press & Autoweek April 28, 1973, page 21. Rarely seen indecision from Roger Penske as Team Penske and Mark Donohue prepare for the 1973 Indianapolis 500. Brian

Take Your Choice

Roger Penske doesn't know which way to jump. In 1 of the least-kept secrets of 1973, the Detroit Chevy dealer ordered an Eagle from Dan Gurney after early tests with the '73 McLarens. "I just want to have it in case," said Roger. "We won't run it until Indianapolis. And I checked with Teddy Mayer and Tyler Alexander of McLaren before I bought the Eagle."

Then, after Gary Bettenhausen's second-place finish at TWS, Penske didn't know which way to go. Gary was driving an updated 1972 McLaren and, late in the race, was the fastest man on the track. "I don't know what to do now," said Penske. "A guy wants to buy the '72 McLaren and now I don't know whether to sell it or not. And maybe we won't need the Eagle either."

#72 B Squared

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 13:31

More of Roger Penske cutting a deal for a race car. This is from Competition Press & Autoweek August 11, 1973, page 22.

Notes from The Glen

The Nth Deal

Following the 6-Hour, Roger Penske negotiated a successful deal (the 56,348th in a series) to dispose of the Porsche Carrera just driven to a 6th place finish by Mark Donohue and George Follmer. A wealthy Mexican racing enthusiast (the 56,349th in a series) purchased the car for an undisclosed sum... in cash. Rumor had it that buyer was set to buy Peter Gregg's car... which finished 10 laps behind Donohue and Follmer... but... reconsidered after carefully comparing the 2 cars at speed. Gregg is a Porsche-Audi dealer. Penske is not.

#73 B Squared

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 14:12

This Sterling Beer Mark Donohue sign was done after Mark's 1972 Indy 500 win. Dad found it for me a number of years ago. I haven't seen another like it, but I'm sure someone from this fine group surely has.

Edit: After having this sign for 4-5 years, I just noticed that the average winning speed on this sign is incorrect. It actually was 162.962 MPH. It surely makes it even more rare. :)

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Edited by B Squared, 05 February 2010 - 11:43.


#74 B Squared

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 13:32

Another piece of memorabilia from Mark's win in the 1972 Indy 500.

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#75 red stick

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 19:11

From Competition Press & Autoweek April 28, 1973, page 21. Rarely seen indecision from Roger Penske as Team Penske and Mark Donohue prepare for the 1973 Indianapolis 500. Brian

Take Your Choice

Roger Penske doesn't know which way to jump. In 1 of the least-kept secrets of 1973, the Detroit Chevy dealer ordered an Eagle from Dan Gurney after early tests with the '73 McLarens. "I just want to have it in case," said Roger. "We won't run it until Indianapolis. And I checked with Teddy Mayer and Tyler Alexander of McLaren before I bought the Eagle."

Then, after Gary Bettenhausen's second-place finish at TWS, Penske didn't know which way to go. Gary was driving an updated 1972 McLaren and, late in the race, was the fastest man on the track. "I don't know what to do now," said Penske. "A guy wants to buy the '72 McLaren and now I don't know whether to sell it or not. And maybe we won't need the Eagle either."


Perhaps less "indecision" than "always staying liquid." The constant testing and re-evaluation of one's assumptions perhaps helps to explain the team's long period of success.

OT: Go Saints! :smoking:

Edited by red stick, 31 January 2010 - 19:13.


#76 B Squared

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 12:52

Perhaps less "indecision" than "always staying liquid." The constant testing and re-evaluation of one's assumptions perhaps helps to explain the team's long period of success.

OT: Go Saints! :smoking:


I've got a Sports Illustrated from 1963 with an eight page article on Mr. Penske in which he precisely lays out his ambitions and his future. He has certainly lived up to most of his own expectations and then some. It would take some time to type it up and include in this thread, but I think I may do so. It doesn't mention Mark Donohue in the article, but it would be insight into why they joined forces and became such a formidable team. Their common trait of wanting to be the very best at whatever they did being reason number one.

OT: who? :p actually, John Mecom Jr. was once the owner of this NFL franchise back when the fans wore bags on their heads and the team was nicknamed the "'Aints." They've come a long way and have Purdue graduate Drew Brees at quarterback. It should be quite a game.

#77 RA Historian

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 15:27

OT: who? :p actually, John Mecom Jr. was once the owner of this NFL franchise back when the fans wore bags on their heads and the team was nicknamed the "'Aints." They've come a long way and have Purdue graduate Drew Brees at quarterback. It should be quite a game.

That's right. Brian had dredged up a piece of the past. The Saints were an expansion franchise awarded to John Mecom in 1966 or so, with the team starting play in, I think, 1967. '67 also was the last year for the Mecom Racing Team, and I have always suspected that the race team shut down because Mecom's interests switched to pro football. He owned it for a number of years, but I do not know off hand when he sold it. Suffice to say, they never had a winning record back then. It has been a long, long journey for the Saints from the bag over the head days to where they are now.
Tom

#78 jj2728

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 16:14

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#79 red stick

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 04:48

The Saints were an expansion franchise awarded to John Mecom in 1966 or so, with the team starting play in, I think, 1967. '67 also was the last year for the Mecom Racing Team, and I have always suspected that the race team shut down because Mecom's interests switched to pro football. He owned it for a number of years, but I do not know off hand when he sold it.


Mecom sold to the current owner in 1985. As a football owner, he should have stuck to auto racing . . .

He is not missed.


I didn't attend many Saints games as a youth, but one that stands out was a 1977 game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, then 0-26 since joining the league as an expansion franchise. Needless to say, the Bucs were victorious. The Mecom years were like that . . .

Edited by red stick, 02 February 2010 - 04:54.


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#80 B Squared

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 12:17

jj2728 - Thanks for posting the victory photo of Mark winning at Mid-Ohio. He won both heats that weekend.

From Sports Illustrated March 25, 1963. What Makes Roger Race by Gilbert Rogin. This is not a short article, but it is well worth the time to read. To me, it's very insightful to the never ending development of Mr. Penske and the empire he runs.

http://sportsillustr...74657/index.htm

Edited by B Squared, 02 February 2010 - 12:23.


#81 AlMark

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 16:45

jj2728 - Thanks for posting the victory photo of Mark winning at Mid-Ohio. He won both heats that weekend.

From Sports Illustrated March 25, 1963. What Makes Roger Race by Gilbert Rogin. This is not a short article, but it is well worth the time to read. To me, it's very insightful to the never ending development of Mr. Penske and the empire he runs.

http://sportsillustr...74657/index.htm


Brian,

An extremely interesting read. Thank you.

#82 ZOOOM

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 16:52

jj2728 - Thanks for posting the victory photo of Mark winning at Mid-Ohio. He won both heats that weekend.

From Sports Illustrated March 25, 1963. What Makes Roger Race by Gilbert Rogin. This is not a short article, but it is well worth the time to read. To me, it's very insightful to the never ending development of Mr. Penske and the empire he runs.

http://sportsillustr...74657/index.htm


Thanks Brian, that story was great!
Terrific insight to Rodger.
ZOOOM

#83 B Squared

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 15:56

This is at Elkhart Lake in 2003(?) for a vintage race. Mark Donohue/ Team Penske Lola T190 or T192. Maybe someone can help me with better identification. I'm unsure of the configuration in which this car has been restored/ maintained. Thanks, B²

From Competition Press & Autoweek March 27, 1971 - Late News:

Mark Donohue will drive a Lola T192M-Traco Chevy in the Mar. 28 Questor Grand Prix at Ontario Motor Speedway. The car is the same one Donohue drove in two 1970 late season Continental Championship victories, updated to 1971 specifications.

photo: B²
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#84 B Squared

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 14:11

Another example of Roger Penske at the cutting edge of auto sports development. This all seems so academic now. From Competition Press and Autoweek December 13, 1969. An article by Wally Huskonen, the photo was uncredited.

Sign of Racing's Growth

PIM Supports Sponsor Investment


Cleveland, Ohio - A sign of auto racing's growth is the increasing number of companies spending money in the sport.

The name of the game for them is promotion - for themselves and their products.

Because they are spending many thousands of dollars, they want to make sure they are doing it effectively.

The answer for a growing number appears to be publicity agencies specializing in auto racing.

An example is Professionals In Motion (PIM), a two-year-old organization that earned its stripes by getting out the facts on Roger Penske's TransAm and other racing efforts.

Groups like PIM are becoming increasingly important to auto racing. They help call the shots when money is funneled into that sport. It is the same money that underwrites many racing teams, adds to purses and contributes to the income of drivers and other full-time people.

Prime mover in PIM is Fred Marik, who explains, "We're in business to help companies participate effectively in auto racing." He not only manages the publicity program covering Penske Racing Enterprises for its primary sponsor, Sun Oil Co., but serves as promotion consultant to several other companies spending money in auto racing.

Many people think Marik's tireless efforts at the Indianapolis 500 greatly helped the favorable impression made by Mark Donohue and his Sunoco-Simoniz Special Lola-Offy.

Although Donohue was a first-year man at Indy, he received almost as much pre-race attention in the national press as such established "500" stars as Mario Andretti and A.J. Foyt. After the race, he was named "500" Rookie of the Year.

Such publicity makes sponsors happy, and happy sponsors continue to support auto racing. If a company isn't happy, it quite likely leaves the sport for good.

"Let's face it. A company new to auto racing can pour a lot of money into the sport and not get much return," Marik points out. The "return" is, of course, publicity and exposure.

"It's not enough today for a company to put its name on the side of a race car. A complete promotional program is needed to get the exposure that counts." And backing a race car may not even be the best approach for a given company, he suggests.

Marik and his staff operate out of an office in the Leader Building in downtown Cleveland. It may seem out of the way for somebody involved in auto racing, but to Marik, a native Clevelander, its relatively central location between East and West is advantageous.

How does Professionals In Motion work with a client? "We examine a company's promotional objectives and advise how they can be achieved through participation in auto sports. We can plan a promotional program, and carry it through on a continuing basis," he explains.

PIM has been receiving a growing number of inquiries from companies who want to become involved with auto racing. One Marik is currently working with is about to introduce a new line of men's toiletries. The promotion of this new line will be tied in with high-performance cars and road-racing.

He likes to cite Sears, Roebuck and Co. as an example of a firm using racing as a vehicle to promote its products. The giant merchandising company has tied in with Penske and Donohue to promote its line of auto products and tools.

"We are optimistic about the future of racing and our connection with it," Marik says. Currently he considers himself a specialist in promotional efforts involving road racing. He has been involved in road racing one way or another since he went through drivers school in an MGA in 1958. After a couple of seasons of racing with unspectacular results, he turned to the organizational side of the sport.

Marik served as race chairman for several professional and amateur events and worked as a race steward. He even worked for a period at SCCA's Westport, Conn., headquarters when the club's professional activities were getting off the ground.

With that background, he sometimes gets impatient with enthusiasts who react against road racing's show business aspects. "It's no longer the leisurely sport for gentlemen it was a few years ago, and if it is to grow, it has to be put on a business-like basis."

Race promoters also come under fire from Marik. "Too many promoters aren't doing the complete job today, particularly those who cry loudest about how tough it is to make money. They are the ones who don't have long-range plans and programs."

Race promotion is one type of work Marik is anxious to try. He understands, from past experience, the organizational problems involved, and with his recent promotional experience, feels confident of success.

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Mark Donohue, Fred Marik and Roger Penske

#85 B Squared

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 21:55

The old Stark & Wetzel Rookie of the Year award from the Indy 500 that was won by Mark in 1969 for his performance. This included qualifying 4th and placing 7th. He was in third late in the race when a faulty magneto being replaced dropped him to seventh. Peter Revson finished 5th after starting 33rd. I really expected to see them share the award like Bobby Marshman and Parnelli Jones did in 1961. It would have been the proper thing to have done, in my opinion, but I was delighted that Mark got the nod in recognition of his high placing before trouble set in. This is the award that is mentioned in the article in the prior post.

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#86 B Squared

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 11:39

Mark Donohue arrives in Victory Lane at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway after his record setting (162.962 MPH) win on May 27, 1972.

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#87 B Squared

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 12:43

Mark Donohue/ Sears Die Hard ad circa 1970:

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#88 Cam2InfoNeeded

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 20:04

I've set aside for years a 1/12 Tamiya F1 driver in pretty much in this exact driving position, and the same helmet (it was the Jim Clark figure from a Lotus 49 kit). I want to use it for a Donohue figure, but have never had the car to put it into (yet).

Edited by Cam2InfoNeeded, 06 February 2010 - 20:04.


#89 B Squared

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 13:55

A variation of the 1967 Sunoco 260 ad that is shown in post #27

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#90 jj2728

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 18:24

More to follow once they've been archived.

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#91 lanciaman

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 20:30

Here's a question for you Donohue experts:

In the late 1970s while working in New York advertising, I bought a car from a lovely man named Dick Bauer, a former racer and PR man. It was a 1960s Ford Fairlane station wagon, reputedly owned by Mark in his salad days and used as his tow car. The wagon was black and had been dechromed; it had minlite wheels, Volvo seats, and a blueprinted engine. It ran wonderfully, looked great and not a little mysterious since it had no badges. I mainly used it for running to the spirits store in New Canaan, and occasionally to Lime Rock.

But I have always wondered about the provenance. Could it really have been Mark's? Of course I would bitterly reproach myself for ever selling it if it was true.

Edited by lanciaman, 07 February 2010 - 20:31.


#92 Cam2InfoNeeded

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 22:36

Just a quick mention of lots of original Donohue photos I've put up in the "Ebay" thread in this Nostalgia forum.

doug s

#93 eldougo

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 04:47

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This is 1973 and Mark Donohue is on his way to becoming Can-Am champion he won 6 of the 8 races then announced his retirement.

#94 B Squared

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 14:06

jj, doug & eldougo - thanks for the photographic contributions.

lanciaman - I've been unable to locate any mention of this as Mark's tow car in Technical Excellence At Speed, but I may not have looked far enough. Michael Argetsinger writes of Mark's 1954 Chevrolet station wagon, nicknamed the "Scaglietti." I'll be talking with Michael later in the week and ask him about your ex-car.

Per tradition, the 1973 Indianapolis 500 featured the winner from the previous race on the ticket face. In this case, Mark Donohue and the McLaren M16B.

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#95 B Squared

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 12:47

From another of the many ads which recognized and rewarded Team Penske and Mark Donohue for their success.

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#96 B Squared

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 13:37

I like this association between Peter DePaolo and Mark Donohue.

My family was blessed to have had a nice friendship with Peter & Sally DePaolo. Peter would come to town on ocassion for speaking engagements and we would usually pick him up at the airport and get him to his motel and about town while he was here. We had a 1962 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II at the time and I think he really liked getting about in this manner. In 1971 Peter and his lovely wife, Sally, joined our family at the old homestead for Thanksgiving dinner. They were such nice people, it is great to have such warm memories of this fine couple. The second photo shows them at our home that day. Sorry about the lack of quality. I took a picture of the original picture which is in a Duesenberg collage that Dad has framed and hanging in the room with our car.

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Edited by B Squared, 18 February 2010 - 16:23.


#97 B Squared

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 13:23

Mark Donohue talks about the accident filled 1973 Indianapolis 500, which would be his last at the fabled Brickyard as a driver. Article by William Jeanes in Competition Press & Autoweek August 11, 1973.

The Best Revenge

The Donohue View

New York - In the aftermath of the Indianapolis "500" an enormous amount of media time and space was largely filled by righteously indignant hysteria victims who knew very little about their subject. Later, many racing figures spoke up... men one presumes who do know something about the subject. In the main, they agreed with the media. There is, however, another side to the arguments we've all heard and it comes from a former "500" winner - Mark Donohue.

Two weeks after the "500" I spoke with Donohue about the USAC rule changes, the race itself and about the people who have criticized everything from Harlan Fengler's ancestry to the using of fuel in a crisis situation - a particular editorial stand taken by the New York Times who didn't let the absence of an alcohol/ methane shortage stem their didgeon for a moment.

Donohue goes willingly along with the need for spectator safety; he also supports the new rule that allows only 40 gallons of fuel and that on one side of the car only - the other side to be filled with an energy-absorbing material. A bit ruefully, he admits that cars will be easier to set-up, the problem of fuel weight-transfer having been effectively removed. "It won't make the cars faster or slower," he said, "It'll just make it easier for the inexperienced guys to have the right car. It should be better racing. I don't like it personally because I like the challenge; but putting in the styrofoam is a big step in increasing the safety."

Donohue is contemptuous of the argument that says Indianapolis should be modernized to keep in step with the new cars. He agrees that a 2-car-abreast start is of possible worth, but treats the modernization concept with disbelief.

"It kills me when they say things like that," Donohue bristled. "If they widen the track and increase the bank angle... why we'd go 215 immediately. Increasing the bank angle or widening the track is complete insanity. Absolutely. That's the result of an ignorant person talking about something he knows nothing about." Donohue went on to say that he would guarantee an Indy car to go 250mph at Daytona or Talledega if his group were given a week to test and prepare... "A track is a track. It's so long and so wide and has such-and such bank angle. But that has nothing to do with whether it's safe or not."

It became obvious that Donohue placed the blame for much of the troubles at Indianapolis squarely on the shoulders of the drivers. He became the first racing figure to publicly defend Harlan Fengler and decry the avalanche of abuse that has been heaped upon the Indy Chief Steward by practically everybody who chose to comment. "He's one of the best guys in racing," said Donohue of Fengler, "And he takes all of this so personally. He lives with that (criticism) all year long and it just tears him apart. He can't control the position of all of those guys by radar. He can't do it. If the drivers don't want to stay in line on the start, they aren't going to do it. He can't force them and neither can anyone else."

Commenting on the lack of a yellow flag following Peter Revson's spin-out this year, Donohue said, "Well, he didn't want to have a yellow light all the time. It's supposed to be a race, not a parade. I came around and saw Peter Revson parked over at the side and I didn't see any reason for a yellow light." Continuing, Donohue said, "I didn't think things were so dangerous that we should panic. We ran a race there last year under the exact same conditions and everything was fine. If a driver makes a mistake, he's going to get in trouble. No matter who you are, you're going to make a mistake 1 of these days. Swede did; Art Pollard did; I will. A lot of people have. When you put your helmet on and bolt on your clothes, you're accepting that possibility."

Donohue thought little of the argument that the 30 days of pageantry tended to put the drivers on edge. "Nobody's forcing us to come there. We come for the prize money like everybody else. Who else pays a million dollars? Nobody comes close. If they wanted us to come 2 months, we'd come 2 months." He characterized the "500" as a happening and a pageant and said, "It's the greatest thing in America really, and we shoudn't knock it."

One who chose to knock Indy was Andy Granatelli, who stated he would not return to Indianapolis unless there were substantial rule changes. Granatelli it is generally agreed had a right to speak also - he had a mechanic killed in the pit lane and Swede Savage was driving 1 of his cars. Donohue disagreed emphatically with the Granatelli statement: "That's got to be the dumbest thing I've ever heard in my life, because who the hell cares whether he comes back or not? Nobody's holding a gun to his head. All he's doing is getting a lot of free publicity for STP at the expense of the racing fraternity, and I don't go for that. If he doesn't come back, they'll have the race anyhow. If I don't come back, they'll have it too. I think he's a good guy and he's done a lot for racing, but when he makes a statement like that, I get mad."

The dust stirred by the 1973 Indy "500" may never settle completely. But the questions raised are terribly important to the survival of motor racing. There is an equally important necessity to heed the need for alternative views. A tragedy's aftermath has never supported objectivity very well. Some of Donohue's views are certain to be unpopular. But considering the source, they have every right to be heard and every need to be examined.

#98 jj2728

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 02:17

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#99 B Squared

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 11:12

jj - thanks again for the photos of Mark. Was Mark "relaxing" in the Porsche or getting ready to exit the car?

From what I understand, the Road America Celebration is shaping up nicely and 15 - 20 of Mark's cars have so far been promised for the event. I'm tired of the current ice box temperatures and looking forward to the warm summer and the Donohue gathering.

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#100 RA Historian

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 15:03

I'm tired of the current ice box temperatures and looking forward to the warm summer and the Donohue gathering.

But Brian, haven't you heard? We are in the earth-is-doomed throes of global warming!
Tom