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Mark Donohue celebration at Road America July, 2010


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#201 B Squared

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 12:32

Mark Donohue and the top twelve finishers in the 1972 Indianapolis 500.

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#202 B Squared

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 16:15

Mark Donohue was a retired race driver when this GoodYear ad came out in the spring of 1974.

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#203 B Squared

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 14:51

Specs for the Formula A Lola T192 which Mark Donohue drove in the 1971 Questor GP. He was fastest of the Formula A runners, qualified 7th. Mark's climb to 3rd was unrewarded due to fuel starvation problems.

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#204 B Squared

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 06:17

A recent update on the confirmed attendees for the Mark Donohue Reunion at Road America:

http://www.catchfenc...a-–-july-15-18/

#205 B Squared

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 12:09

Mark Donohue shows the fatigue of a two race weekend. In this uncredited photo, he checks over notes between sessions at the Questor Grand Prix. Most likely tire temperatures with the presence of the GoodYear rep.

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Edited by B Squared, 09 April 2010 - 14:50.


#206 B Squared

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 13:45

A 1973 Indy 500 drivers meeting photo of the five former winners in the field. Mario Andretti, Al Unser, Mark Donohue, Bobby Unser and A.J. Foyt.

Roger McCluskey and David "Salt" Walther are seen above Foyt. Possibly Peter Revson looking between Mark & Bobby.

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#207 B Squared

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 11:11

In regards to the debut of the Team Penske Lola T-330 AMC Formula 5000 at Mid-Ohio with Mark Donohue at the wheel. Competition Press & Autoweek, June 23, 1973.

Search the Sky

Roger Penske's Sunoco AMC Lola pulled the Goodrich Blimp routine until 1:30pm Saturday. Like the Graf Bolus, it appeared Penske's famous "unfair advantage" was "hard to see." The advantage turned out to be an invisible race car. Mark Donohue, according to the week's best line, set the fastest lap with an elapsed time of zero.

When the big blue truck finally arrived in the paddock, it was like a people magnet. Those who fought their way through the crowd were treated to a Lola T330 unlike any other in the L & M 5000. "It's just because the Matador engine has totally different pickup points on the bulkhead," argued Penske publicist Dan Luginbuhl.

But that didn't account for the trick front suspension or the movement of the oil coolers to just behind the front wheels.

Thanks to 2 extra days at Indianapolis, the blue crew had 104 man-hours of work to do and only 72 hours in which to do it. General Manager Chuck Cantwell and 4 crewmen flew from Indy to Philadelphia at 9:30pm Wednesday. They worked around the clock fabricating the new coolers, painting the car, and making suspension changes suggested by tests at Road Atlanta. The car left the Penske shops at 4am Saturday.

When they arrived at the track, the team had time to bleed the brakes, take 3 laps to see that nothing leaked, and run 2 timed laps. Donohue qualified at 1:29.555, 9th in the 2nd heat. He finished 3rd in the race. Not bad for a Goodrich blimp.

#208 B Squared

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 10:18

Gordon Kirby's latest The Way It Is column is with American racing legend Parnelli Jones. Mark Donohue's name comes up in conversation a couple of times. "And of course, Mark Donohue was also a great race driver."

http://www.gordonkir...t_is_no229.html

#209 B Squared

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 13:50

At Daytona for final pre-season testing, the Penske-Kirk White Sunoco Ferrari 512M driven by Mark Donohue and David Hobbs. Uncredited photo.

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#210 B Squared

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 13:11

Back on March 3rd, I mentioned the, then new, Sunoco television commercial that included footage of Mark Donohue and early Team Penske accomplishments. I finally found a link to it:

http://www.gosunoco....dvertising.aspx

#211 B Squared

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 14:10

Between the tire changes and the wing size, 1972 saw speeds go through the roof at Indy. The 1971 pole sitter, Peter Revson, would have been too slow to make the field the next year. Mark Donohue shares star billing with the GoodYear tire that helped make it possible.

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#212 B Squared

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 14:03

Roger Penske leans into the cockpit of the 1972 CanAm Porsche 917/10 with Mark Donohue in the driver's seat.

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#213 B Squared

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 15:57

Mark Donohue exits his 12th place Camaro during the night at the 1968 Daytona 24 Hour

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#214 B Squared

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 12:39

Chief mechanic Karl Kainhofer tends to the turbo-charged Offenhauser in the Mark Donohue driven, Penske/Sunoco/Simoniz Lola 4WD at Indianapolis in 1969. Mark placed seventh after a late magneto problem dropped him from third.

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#215 B Squared

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 14:17

Mark Donohue and Joe Leonard are featured on the cover of the 1972 The Fabulous 500 Race HIstory by C. Lee Norquest. The top photo is Mark in the 1971 McLaren M16. The '72 car is in the bottom photo.

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Edited by B Squared, 02 May 2010 - 14:19.


#216 B Squared

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 12:14

Back cover of the Norquest supplement with renderings of the 1971 & '72 McLaren's driven by Mark Donohue.

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#217 B Squared

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 11:37

Mark Donohue begins lap 3 of the 1971 Indianapolis 500. The obvious dominance ended with a broken transmission on lap 66.

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#218 Fez

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 17:55

Mark Donohue is a wonderful pick for the Road America celebration. In addition to being a great racer, Donohue was also a very good person. He went out of his way to help other drivers --which was sometimes rare in the hyper-competitive world of auto racing.

Here is helping my Dad with his car setup before a race in Michigan in 1969. Dad said Donohue helped him on numerous occasions.

(The left picture is of Donohue with my Dad's Car, the right picture is him ready to drive before a test drive after they changed the set-up. The guy standing next to him in the right side photo is my dad, Dick Lang).
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Edited by Fez, 05 May 2010 - 17:59.


#219 B Squared

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 18:21

Fez - Thanks for the interesting post and photos.

The last competition related headline I cut out for my Mark Donohue collection, August, 1975.

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#220 B Squared

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Posted 08 May 2010 - 12:15

Mark Donohue and co-driver David Hobbs wait as their Penske/Kirk F. White Sunoco Ferrari 512M is repaired during the 1971 Daytona 24 Hours.

I notice a NASA Apollo 14 moon landing mission patch on Hobbs' right shoulder. Does anyone know what the association may be?

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#221 Cam2InfoNeeded

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 02:10

I can't let Brian do all of the work here.

Here is an old photo I found while "surfing" today.
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Here it is with a little Photoshop clean up.
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Edge of photo say "Mar 68". It's his Sunoco Trans Am Camaro. It might be an early testing session, or something from a 1967 race and wasn't printed until '68.

Mark got his money's worth at the barber that week.

Edited by Cam2InfoNeeded, 09 May 2010 - 02:15.


#222 B Squared

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 12:18

Mark got his money's worth at the barber that week.


:up: Thanks for the photo contribution and the laugh. Being that I have a flat top myself, Joe, my 76 year old barber, has not yet cut one that short for me.

Mark Donohue passes 1972 team mate and champion, George Follmer, during the 1973 CanAm. Some one appears to have gotten into Mark's left side.
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#223 B Squared

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 13:26

Mark Donohue, Roger Penske, Karl Kainhofer and crew with the 1973 Eagle - Offy at Indianapolis in 1973.

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#224 arttidesco

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 01:19

Fez - Thanks for the interesting post and photos.

The last competition related headline I cut out for my Mark Donohue collection, August, 1975.

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I had no idea that the Talladega Record was run in anything other than Sunoco colours thanks for posting this Brian :-)

What is CAM2 anyway, I have only ever seen it on Penske Indy Cars I think one of the Allison brothers raced a CAM2 McLaren for the Captain in 74/75 was that red as well ?

#225 JacnGille

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 01:29

What is CAM2 anyway... ?


It was a brand of motor oil.

#226 B Squared

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 02:27

A Sunoco product. The McLaren IndyCars in the Cam2 colors were beautiful. Some promotional material with Mark, Mr. Penske and Bobby Allison. At the bottom, a better view of the Porsche.

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Edited by B Squared, 12 May 2010 - 02:32.


#227 Tom Smith

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 07:07

[quote name='B Squared' post='4339671' date='May 11 2010, 19:27']A Sunoco product. The McLaren IndyCars in the Cam2 colors were beautiful. Some promotional material with Mark, Mr. Penske and Bobby Allison. At the bottom, a better view of the Porsche.

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Roger Penske sold the Cam 2 Mclaren M-16 to Roy Woods Racing. A couple friends I new at RWR let me come over to see it when they first received it still in Cam 2 livery with the contrasting red pin stripes from Penske. It did have an extremely tasty paint job, even by Penske's high standards. The images here don't show well enough to see the extensive pin strip designs all over the coach work clearly. Roy Wood's cars were also prepared to a high standard. My memory says it was an M-16C with a Traco Offy and possibly it was the last M-16C built. An almost brand new obsolete Indy car at the time. I watched it get rebuilt into the Carling Black Label car driven by David Hobbs. No idea what happened to it after that but I would'nt bet against its remains having morphed into some other more significant Mclaren M-16, probably Marks. You think?
Mark gave me two 5 gallon buckets of the gear oil he used in his cars, Sunoco 140wt. mil spec
tank transmission oil, it really stinks awful.

Edited by Tom Smith, 13 May 2010 - 03:04.


#228 arttidesco

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 10:11

To date I have nly seen B&W pics of Bobby Allison in Penske's McLaren thanks Brian :-)

#229 arttidesco

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 03:03

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1970 Indy 500. Pace lap. Mark qualified fifth alongside McClusky and Art Pollard. He finished second. Portent of things to come.
This was a great shot when I took it but it's been hanging on my wall for almost 40 years. The color has faded quite a bit.
The guys over on Track Forum managed to photochop it to make it look better. At my age I'm lucky I can even figure out how to post it!

ZOOOM


Howdy Zoom I read what you were saying about photochop and I took the liberty of giving your fantastic picture a little TLC :-)

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If you don't like it just say it will get deleted and we will forget it ever happened :-)

Thanks for posting the original either way :-)

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#230 Tom Smith

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 07:19

It was a brand of motor oil.

Cam 2 was also the brand name for the racing gas they produced.
Sun Oil built the first large scale catalytic-cracking plant sometime in the thirties in Marcus Hook, PA where they pioneered octane. Mark had a skid pad at the Marcus Hook refinery when he was driving the various Penske Sunoco cars.
The Cam 2 Porsche didn't really work out all that well at Talladega for what ever reason.


#231 arttidesco

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 07:50

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917/30, Goodwood Festival of Speed, 03 07 09 Ralph Juergen Colmar


Reading post #219 looks like the biggest problem the team had was light rain, last year I was watching a live internet stream of Awesome Bill from Dawsonville have a crack at setting a world closed circuit record at Talladega for an eathanol fuelled car, in an 800 hp Mustang, and they had the same problem with iffy weather, they were ready to call off the days activities when Bill had one final run and put the car lightly into the wall ruining the attempt all together.

Edited by arttidesco, 13 May 2010 - 07:51.


#232 B Squared

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 15:41

The Cam 2 Porsche didn't really work out all that well at Talladega for what ever reason.


In spite of problems and having to re-engineer certain components, they did come away with the record. Maybe that it was the one of the fastest cars on earth being man-handled around the fastest oval used for racing, on the absolute limit of adhesion had something to do do with it not looking easy. Michael Argetsinger covers the record attempts in Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence At Speed in chapter 163: Try for the Record and chapter 171: Record Run Observed by the Great One.

A couple of excerpts follow. The first explains how Cam2 came to be on the car from page 287:

The famous blue and yellow Sunoco Special colors did not have the honor of being on the record car. The car appeared in red and black as the CAM2 Special. During the height of the oil crisis in 1974, Sunoco management decided that it was not the time for their logo to appear on a race car. The 1974 Indy car had appeared as the Score Special because Score was the name chosen for the mass-merchandised product planned by Sun Oil. It was not in stores at the time because of a federal ban on introducing new oil products during the crisis. Sun decided to run Indy with the Score name in expectation of product being available later in the year. But entrepreneur Mickey Thompson objected to the name - SCORE was the acronym for his racing operation, Southern California Off Road Enterprises. Rather than negotiate with Thompson, Sun changed the product name to CAM2. The first year the new product could be legally marketed was 1975, so the name and its colors were on the 917-30 for the record runs.

from pages 298-299:

"When we were at Daytona in the spring and fell on our faces, I felt really terrible," Mark told Pete Lyons. "We'd said we were going to go fast and we weren't able to. So I went to the Porsche guys and said, 'Look, you've got to help us.'" He explained how Porsche had come up with an intercooler that would allow the engine to live at a sustained high speed. "The problem had been that, as a road-racing engine, it only had to develop its horsepower for about ten seconds or so," Mark continued, "but on the oval we needed it for a couple of minutes on end."

further on page 299:

Mark was indeed happy. Standing in the cockpit of the red Porsche he laughed and clowned. A can of CAM2 oil was handed to him for publicity purposes and he pretended to open it and drink it as if it was a can of beer.

"At 220 you're working pretty hard to keep the car on the track," he told Pete Lyons. "You come into the banking about in the middle, to avoid some bumps, and gradually let the car drift up to the top. It's wiggling around and sliding a lot; it's really very difficult. The engine would be about 100 rpm down coming out of the corner, and would build up again by the end of the straight; maybe it was dropping down more in the middle of the turn but I was too busy to look!"

#233 arttidesco

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 02:55

Thanks for the inside info Brian Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence At Speed, sounds like a fascinating read :-)

Does it mention anything about the 1975 Race of Champions at Brands Hatch, the only F1 race I recall attending with snow flurry ?

#234 Tom Smith

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 04:25

In spite of problems and having to re-engineer certain components, they did come away with the record. Maybe that it was the one of the fastest cars on earth being man-handled around the fastest oval used for racing, on the absolute limit of adhesion had something to do do with it not looking easy. Michael Argetsinger covers the record attempts in Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence At Speed in chapter 163: Try for the Record and chapter 171: Record Run Observed by the Great One.

A couple of excerpts follow. The first explains how Cam2 came to be on the car from page 287:

The famous blue and yellow Sunoco Special colors did not have the honor of being on the record car. The car appeared in red and black as the CAM2 Special. During the height of the oil crisis in 1974, Sunoco management decided that it was not the time for their logo to appear on a race car. The 1974 Indy car had appeared as the Score Special because Score was the name chosen for the mass-merchandised product planned by Sun Oil. It was not in stores at the time because of a federal ban on introducing new oil products during the crisis. Sun decided to run Indy with the Score name in expectation of product being available later in the year. But entrepreneur Mickey Thompson objected to the name - SCORE was the acronym for his racing operation, Southern California Off Road Enterprises. Rather than negotiate with Thompson, Sun changed the product name to CAM2. The first year the new product could be legally marketed was 1975, so the name and its colors were on the 917-30 for the record runs.

from pages 298-299:

"When we were at Daytona in the spring and fell on our faces, I felt really terrible," Mark told Pete Lyons. "We'd said we were going to go fast and we weren't able to. So I went to the Porsche guys and said, 'Look, you've got to help us.'" He explained how Porsche had come up with an intercooler that would allow the engine to live at a sustained high speed. "The problem had been that, as a road-racing engine, it only had to develop its horsepower for about ten seconds or so," Mark continued, "but on the oval we needed it for a couple of minutes on end."

further on page 299:

Mark was indeed happy. Standing in the cockpit of the red Porsche he laughed and clowned. A can of CAM2 oil was handed to him for publicity purposes and he pretended to open it and drink it as if it was a can of beer.

"At 220 you're working pretty hard to keep the car on the track," he told Pete Lyons. "You come into the banking about in the middle, to avoid some bumps, and gradually let the car drift up to the top. It's wiggling around and sliding a lot; it's really very difficult. The engine would be about 100 rpm down coming out of the corner, and would build up again by the end of the straight; maybe it was dropping down more in the middle of the turn but I was too busy to look!"


I remember talking with Holman-Moody's engine dyno man, Dewey Willard, who was in Detroit doing some engine machining work for Mclaren over the winter. This was at some point not too long after Mark had set the official record with the Cam 2 Porsche.
He told me that Holman-Moody did all their endurance testing on the oval at Charlotte with the MKIV 427 Fords that raced at Le Mans. He said Holman-Moody's test driver, Buck Baker drove them at redline RPM on the oval for 100s of miles of testing. Interestingly, in reference to Mark's Porsche, he said the MKIVs averaged 220 MPH at redline RPM and no matter what the Ford engineers tried, that was all they could get a MKIV to run on an oval.
After Ford retired the MKIVs and shut down their endurance racing program he said Holman-Moody built one more car, this one was based on a narrowed Holman-Moody stock car chassis and roll cage with a fastback body and was powered by a Ford SOHC 427 hemi. He said Holman-Moody wanted to use that engine in their MKIVs but the Ford engineers didn't let them, so they used the SOHC to prove a point to themselves that they were right. Dewey revered that car, not the GT-40s or MKIV Fords, it's easy to understand why.
Buck Baker averaged 245 MPH using the same 6500 RPM redline the MkIVs used, at which point the tire engineers starting shitting so they parked it. Then Nascar came over and informed them that they should never bring that thing back to the track again.
Dewey made it clear that Holman-Moody payed absolute attention to engine redline during track testing and the tire engineers knew exactly what speed their tires averaged. He assumed the tire engineers would have told Mark and that Mark was probably slightly embarrassed with his official record.

Edited by Tom Smith, 14 May 2010 - 09:08.


#235 arttidesco

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 11:01

Seems highly unusual that Buck Baker should have driven a 245 mph lap and no one was present to officially or even unofficially record it, equally hard to see how a driver can maintain maximum revs around Charlotte which at only a mile and a half Charlotte must have corners considerably tighter than 'Dega 2.66 mile configuration, however if true one might imagine the whole Penske operation would have been embarrassed if they knew about it, any idea what happened to the Holman Moody special ?

#236 Tom Smith

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 03:44

Seems highly unusual that Buck Baker should have driven a 245 mph lap and no one was present to officially or even unofficially record it, equally hard to see how a driver can maintain maximum revs around Charlotte which at only a mile and a half Charlotte must have corners considerably tighter than 'Dega 2.66 mile configuration, however if true one might imagine the whole Penske operation would have been embarrassed if they knew about it, any idea what happened to the Holman Moody special ?


I don't know much more except that they relieved Kyle Petty of $20,000.00 with it when he thought a Hemi-Cuda with a Petty Enterprises twin plug aluminum head 426 drag racing hemi was a match for it. Apparently it was disguised as a Boss 302 Mustang. None of it was done with any official observers for obvious reasons. They wanted to see how much faster of a car they could build than the MKIVs without Ford engineers involved.
Mclaren's engine manager told me that Dewey had done the dyno development work on the 4 cam Ford Indy engines, the 427 SOHC engines, the MKIV Fords, invented tunnel port heads for Ford's Nascar motors, and was an expert machinist.
He and I were involved with building a 1.4 liter turbo charged 4 cylinder "baby" BMW engine at the time. It ended up becoming BMW Motorsport's 1.5 liter turbo charged F1 engine Nelson Piquet used at Brabham.

#237 Cam2InfoNeeded

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 20:18

In my "heavy-duty" Donohue searching days, I went out to the East Coast (from California) a quite few times on business, usually spent a few weeks at a time (one company, it was 6 weeks at a time). In one of my hunts, I made contact with some Sunoco employees in Ohio, and got a few interesting things. One of them was a full case of the red canned Cam2 oil liked was used for the Talladega record run. I still have it in my storage unit, and thought they might be nice bases for Cam2 model cars. Next time I'm in my storage, I'll try to snap a photo of one of the cans. There was also a set of Cam2 (red) coasters I got from them.

I'm still in my early stages of making a whole list of mods to a 1/18 scale diecast Cam2 model. When I get some significant work completed on it, I'll show everyone a photo or two of it here.

Regarding the record run, hopefully someone can recount the reason for the Cam2 run in the first place. I'm getting old (and my memory hasn't always been the sharpest, anyway) but I seem to recall Roger had got fined in a Nascar race for using "illegal" engine parts. The fine that was levied (I seem to remember something like $20,000), was agreed to repaid to him if he could drum up some publicity by bring the 917/30 to set a new closed course speed record. Since they lost I think 2 engines at the first failed attempt a Daytona, I think he must have gone in the hole from the reimbursed fine, but hopefully saw the publicity to Sunoco and Penske Racing as an overall benefit to all.

Edited by Cam2InfoNeeded, 15 May 2010 - 20:27.


#238 B Squared

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 15:45

Thanks for the inside info Brian Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence At Speed, sounds like a fascinating read :-)

Does it mention anything about the 1975 Race of Champions at Brands Hatch, the only F1 race I recall attending with snow flurry ?


Sorry for the delay in answering your question. Michael Argetsinger covers the 1975 Race of Champions at Brands Hatch in chapter 165 of Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence At Speed. It is on page 289, titled "The wet is a great equalizer". Mark finished a fine 6th behind Lauda/ Ferrari, Fittipaldi/ McLaren, Andretti/ Parnelli, Watson/Surtees, and Depailler/ Tyrrell.

#239 Tim Murray

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 17:41

Mark finished a fine 6th behind Lauda/ Ferrari, Fittipaldi/ McLaren, Andretti/ Parnelli, Watson/Surtees, and Depailler/ Tyrrell.

These are the results of the International Trophy at Silverstone. The Race of Champions was won by Tom Pryce, sadly his only F1 win. Donohue qualified seventh, but the Penske was apparently handling like a pig in the race causing Mark to spin twice, the second one putting him out of the race. Like RJC I remember the snow at Brands very well. It was the last time I had anything to do with a cigarette - I accepted one from a very nice John Player girl in a desperate bid to keep warm by using the ciggy as a source of heat (!)

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#240 arttidesco

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 20:01

Tim thanks for sharing your memory, took me another 40 years to give up, admittedly I was only cadging them and smoking them behind the bike sheds back then, too young for the JPS girls to offer me one :-)

Brian, Tim is right you have the Silverstone results, I just wondered if any mention was made by Mark of driving a formula one car in the snow at Brands Hatch, I do not imagine that has happened too often :-)



#241 B Squared

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 23:15

Tim & arttidesco - My mistake, not Michael's. I wasn't paying close enough attention when reading from Technical Excellence At Speed on page 289.

"On race day it snowed before the start and the track was a mixture of wet and dry. Reveling in the conditions, Mark ran a strong sixth place before spinning. He was further delayed when he made a pit stop for overheating, but returned to the race and continued to impress. Near the end he had another spin and hit the guardrail, putting him out of the race. Tom Pryce scored his first Formula One win, also the first for UOP Shadow."

Once again, apologies for my careless oversight on this.


#242 RA Historian

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 23:26

I just wondered if any mention was made by Mark of driving a formula one car in the snow at Brands Hatch, I do not imagine that has happened too often :-)

1978 Grand Prix of Canada at Montreal. Periodic snow flurries during the race. Perhaps Manfred remembers this also.
Tom

#243 arttidesco

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 00:41

No worries Brian thanks for getting back with Marks view :-)

RA Historian, thanks for the update on F1 races run through snow, figures that it should also be snowmobile champ Gilles first GP win :-) is that the race where Emerson Fittipaldi drove his F5A wearing his puffa jacket to keep warm ?

#244 eldougo

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 04:13

[quote name='B Squared' date='May 18 2010, 09:15' post='4358538']

Tom Pryce scored his first Formula One win, also the first for UOP Shadow TRUE...............( Just to keep the records straight it was a non-championship Formula One race ).




#245 B Squared

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 12:37

Tom Pryce scored his first Formula One win, also the first for UOP Shadow TRUE...............( Just to keep the records straight it was a non-championship Formula One race ).


Thanks for your input eldougo. I assumed all of the parties discussing this were astute enough to know this was a non-championship race, otherwise I would have mentioned it.

Michael Argetsinger starts chapter 165 "The wet is a great equalizer" in Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence At Speed with the following sentence:

"Non-championship Formula One races were still part of the racing scene in 1975, particularly in England, which was the center of the Grand Prix racing industry."

Apologies again if I assumed incorrectly and failed to mention the non-championship status.

#246 B Squared

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 13:35

The following photo was taken by fellow TNF'er Paul Medici and is being used with his permission. Thanks again Paul. Unfortunately, he is unsure of where the photo (dated June, 1972) may have been taken at and he asked for assistance in identifying the show car being used to promote GoodYear's and Mark Donohue's recent Indianapolis 500 victory. The following is my best guess. Maybe someone in the group can help with corrections and clarifications. Thanks in advance.

Posted Image

My initial reaction was "it's the 7th placed 1969 Lola." I then got the official qualifying photo from IMS and I believe that I was proven correct in my reaction. Maybe not THE car, but I feel that they may have kept this as a display car - though I've no clue about the colors. Possibly GoodYear owned it at this point, hence the color change and it not being painted in any of the competing team's colors. Just a guess on this point. I believe that this may be at a trade show of some type, as I see "Land Air Sea" , "Permafoam" and "General Electric" on the visable kiosks behind the car.

The identifiers, at least to me, on the car itself are:

A) Front and rear suspension configuration and attachment points
B) Wheels and knock-offs
C) Angle at rear of Nose cone by front A-arm attachment points
D) Angle at the back point of the windshield where it intersects with the roll bar area
E) The shallow in height NACA duct on the driver's left on the nose
F) Fuel Filler location on the monocoque
G) Size & shape of the visable dashboard area in cockpit

photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Posted Image
Jerry Kroninger, Roger Penske, Karl Kainhofer & Carl Haas are amongst those pictured with Mark and the Lola

#247 RA Historian

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 13:54

RA Historian, thanks for the update on F1 races run through snow, figures that it should also be snowmobile champ Gilles first GP win :-) is that the race where Emerson Fittipaldi drove his F5A wearing his puffa jacket to keep warm ?

Don't know about that, but I would not be surprised; it was bitterly cold that day.
Tom

#248 arttidesco

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 20:31

RA H I saw a you tube clip from Canada and I am sure Murray Walker mentioned Emerson wearing a puffa jacket in the car during the race, I'll see if I can find it again :-)

Great Lola pics Brian, I never realised how clumsy some of the early Indy turbo installations were look how close that installation is to the fuel tank, some of the metal parts must have been candescent when the car came into pit ?

Looking at the nose, does anyone know what the inlet above the 2nd 6 on the nose was for ?

It's reminiscent of McLaren's F-Duct but presumably for some completely different purpose.

#249 Tom Smith

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Posted 19 May 2010 - 06:33

The following photo was taken by fellow TNF'er Paul Medici and is being used with his permission. Thanks again Paul. Unfortunately, he is unsure of where the photo (dated June, 1972) may have been taken at and he asked for assistance in identifying the show car being used to promote GoodYear's and Mark Donohue's recent Indianapolis 500 victory. The following is my best guess. Maybe someone in the group can help with corrections and clarifications. Thanks in advance.

Posted Image

My initial reaction was "it's the 7th placed 1969 Lola." I then got the official qualifying photo from IMS and I believe that I was proven correct in my reaction. Maybe not THE car, but I feel that they may have kept this as a display car - though I've no clue about the colors. Possibly GoodYear owned it at this point, hence the color change and it not being painted in any of the competing team's colors. Just a guess on this point. I believe that this may be at a trade show of some type, as I see "Land Air Sea" , "Permafoam" and "General Electric" on the visable kiosks behind the car.

The identifiers, at least to me, on the car itself are:

A) Front and rear suspension configuration and attachment points
B) Wheels and knock-offs
C) Angle at rear of Nose cone by front A-arm attachment points
D) Angle at the back point of the windshield where it intersects with the roll bar area
E) The shallow in height NACA duct on the driver's left on the nose
F) Fuel Filler location on the monocoque
G) Size & shape of the visable dashboard area in cockpit

photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Posted Image
Jerry Kroninger, Roger Penske, Karl Kainhofer & Carl Haas are amongst those pictured with Mark and the Lola


I saw Mark's Lola in a warehouse sometime in the late 70s and it was still blue and yellow. It was no longer equipped with 4WD.
Looking at the two images, Mark's Lola has the mirrors on streamline mounts affixed to the tub, the 11 has the mirrors affixed to the windscreen. Unable to tell if Mark's Lola had a whisker on the right side of the nose or not, but it does have one on the left side. The 11 doesn't have one on the right side. I'd guess the front duct was for cooling the front diff.
"Slick and smooth Kainhofer" looks pretty confident.

#250 arttidesco

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Posted 19 May 2010 - 10:35

Amazing in the light of how F1 is often paraded as the technology driven arm of single seat open wheelers that the late 60's early seventies USAC Indy Series was right up there with 4 WD too !

I had no idea, when was 4WD dropped on Indy cars ?