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And . . . . the question is . . . . . (Part 2)


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#1 Mike Argetsinger

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 05:30

The winner is the first person to provide all correct answers on a single post.

1. What is the the middle name of Sir Stirling Moss?

2. Whose helmet was Alberto Ascari wearing the day he died at Monza?

3. Who was Antonio Ascari's riding mechanic in the 1924 French Grand Prix?

4. Who drove the first ever rear engined car to start a post war (WW2) formula car GP (a round in the driver's World Championship)?

5. What number was Jim Clark's winning Lotus-Ford in the 1965 Indy 500?

6. A natural talent is appreciated in any sport. Who starred at Quidditch for Gryffindor house his first year at Hogwarts?

7. Sometimes a great talent goes to a great team but it's just the wrong year. What is the model designation of the Chapparal that John Surtees drove for Jim Hall?

8. When Tony Brooks won the Syracuse Grand Prix for Connaught it had been a long time since a British driver had last won a continental Grand Prix in a British car. Who was the previous such winner? What year? What car? Where? (You need all four parts of this answer to be considered correct.)

9. Who was the most successful Grand Prix driver whose first name was Norman?

10. Dr. Giuseppe 'Nino' Farina - motor racing's first official World Champion in 1950 - in what discipline did he receive his doctorate?

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#2 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 06:25

Mike,
What has this odd #6 question to do with GP racing?

#3 Roger Clark

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 11:06

1 Crauford
2 Castellotti
3 Ramponi
4 harry Schell
5 82
6 Harry Potter (??)
7 2H
8 Henry Segrave, Garn Premio of San Sebastin, 25/9/24, Sunbeam
9 norman graham Hill
10 Commercial Science

#4 Mike Argetsinger

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 17:59

Roger - Thanks for playing the game. It obviously didn't capture the enthusiam of the group as I had perhaps hoped it might. But my sincere appreciation to you for participating. I am declaring you the winner although my information differs from your answer on #10. I had it as a Law degree from Turin University but I have only one source available on it so I suspect you may have superior information. Anyway you are the clear winner and if you drop me a note with your address I'll send a small prize as a token of respect for your interest and enthusiasm. Thanks again.

Hans - re Harry Potter in #6 - you've got me - he has nothing to do with GP racing - but he was said to be a wizard in the twisty bits and pure magic through the high speed sweepers!

#5 Wolf

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 18:03

I knew nr.1 :blush: :cry:. Can anone expand on nr. 4 please?

#6 david_martin

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 18:10

Mike,

I have a question regarding #8. Depending on your interpretation of what constitutues a continental grand prix, would Reg Parnell winning the Swedish Winter Grand Prix in an ERA type-A, held at Börlange, Sweden on the 9th February 1947 qualify?

#7 Roger Clark

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 18:31

My information about Farina's degree came from a magazine article about him by Johnny Lurani. The article was in four languages luckily for me as my Italian is non-existant, but the original reads

"il nostro campione e brillantemente laureato in Scienze Commerciali"

#8 Mike Argetsinger

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 19:18

Roger - As I said above, I am prepared to defer to you on this. My information came from a book by Doug Nye. The Lurani article you cite is doubtless a bit closer to the source.

David - You may well be right. I just remember when Brooks won that race it made quite a sensation and it was generally acknowledged at the time to be the first such win in 31 years. And I have since seen it so referred to in various references over the years. So it was just in my concienceness to be so. But your information on the Swedish Winter GP is very interesting. I personally was unaware of this race. Perhaps some of our other contributors may care to comment?

#9 Felix Muelas

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 20:06

Originally posted by Wolf
Can anyone expand on nr. 4 please?


20th May 1950. Monaco GP. You might have heard this story several times, so I´ll expand just the necessary.
Moss and Schell win their respective Heats in the supporting F3 race, and Moss finally wins the final. Schell then installs a 1.100cc JAP engine in place of his usual 500cc in the Cooper T12, and takes the start of the Grand Prix at the back. There is the famous pile-up on lap one and the Cooper F1 debut ends there.

Now, if you want an "explanation" of how Schell got an entry for the Grand Prix race at the wheel of that "upgraded" F3 car, I don´t have one! Nye refers to the fact as a "wangle", and I think I might have read sometime ago that an authomatic entry for the winner of the F3 race would be a possibility, but that leaves unexplained in my memory why wasn´t Moss then the participant.

So I will join you here, and ask the Senator Memebers of the Forum to clarify this one...

Meanwhile, let´s take a look at two pictures from this event where the details of the Cooper JAP are visible.

:)
Felix

Posted Image
Posted Image

#10 Felix Muelas

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 20:16

Originally posted by david_martin
Depending on your interpretation of what constitutues a continental grand prix, would Reg Parnell winning the Swedish Winter Grand Prix in an ERA type-A, held at Börlange, Sweden on the 9th February 1947 qualify?


:lol: :lol: :lol:

Don´t you think we are taking both the words "continental" and "grand prix" to their extremes? 3 ERA´s and a Bugatti 35?

I liked Reg Parnell too, but if I was to follow THAT route, I will definitely not choose that (funny) race! I might (but don´t quote me) prefer the 1947 Stockholm Grand Prix, held on the 23rd of February, with eleven cars taking the start, 30,000 people watching and Maseratis, Talbots, Delahayes and ERAs all with twin rear wheels!

Important note for my 8W colleague Rainer Nyberg :
Rainer, don´t get me wrong on this one. I very much doubt that, apart from the title of the race, even you will agree that the 1947 Swedish Grand Prix was -and I let you explain the reasons- a Grand Prix.

Felix Muelas

#11 david_martin

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Posted 11 November 2000 - 20:42

Felix,

I did stress the interpretation of continental grand prix!! I don't know if you know anything about Börlange, but it is not a very big place at all and just about the only thing there is a very big steel plant. Amazing that they had a race there at all. And February, in North/Central Sweden, probably meant that it was run with snow on the ground, if not the circuit. Perhaps it should be considered more of a relation to the close circuit special stages of the Rally of Sweden that a grand prix :lol:

#12 Dave Ware

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Posted 12 November 2000 - 00:26

Although Alain de Cadanet can, like anyone else, be wrong...he did host a recent broadcast of the '53 (or was it '54) German Grand Prix, and he referred to Farina as a Doctor of Law.

Dave

#13 Wolf

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Posted 12 November 2000 - 00:37

Felix, I knew nothing about that. Is that Cooper the same type as Cooper JAP Moss ran during '49 and '50? I belive it was also 1.1 liter engine. Here's photo of Moss at LaGarda (I belive it was his first run on the continent- 3. overall/1. in class).

Posted Image

#14 Milan Fistonic

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Posted 12 November 2000 - 00:40

Doug Nye, in Georgano's Encyclopedia of Motor Sport, also refers to Farina as a Doctor of Law.

But to further confuse the issue Cutter and Fendell in their Encycodedia of Auto Racing Greats refers to him firstly as "the Italian lawyer-turned-racing driver" and then as "a brilliant student (earning a doctorate in political econcomy) and a crack athlete....."[p][Edited by Milan Fistonic on 11-12-2000]

#15 jarama

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Posted 12 November 2000 - 01:08

Wolf,

certainly this shot is taken during the IX Circuito del Garda, on 10 July 1949.

According to the book "Stirling Moss/My cars, my career", it was the introduction to European road racing for S.M.

The Cooper was a Mk III JAP powered, 1000cc. He finished 3rd in heat, 3rd in final, 1st 1100cc class.




#16 Felix Muelas

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Posted 12 November 2000 - 20:41

Originally posted by Wolf
Is that Cooper the same type as Cooper JAP Moss ran during '49 and '50?


No. The car you pictured (that Jarama perfectly identified) was, using non-confusing Cooper denomination (there were all sorts of Marks I, II etc) a T9 in "F2" configuration, i.e. with an 1000cc twin JAP engine. That car was sold by Moss at the end of the year 1950 to a privateer named Jim Burgoyne.

For 1950, a development of that car received the name of T12 (also known as Mark IV). The car that Schell raced at Monaco was a T12, but this time -in the Grand Prix- with an enlarged to 1100 twin JAP engine.

Moss continued with the T9 throught 1950, so there is no special reason to believe that the T9 in Monaco F3 fashion was too different from the one he used at Garda in 1949. :)

Felix Muelas