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Fernando Alonso thread [merged]


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#5001 e34

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 14:06

To me the annoyance is that some think Alonso is better than Raikkonen, and that Ferrari dropping him is proof of that.

My opinion is that they are both pretty evenly matched (illustrated by their many on track battles) and the Ferrari decision is purely a commercial one (to get Santander) or they never would have paid Raikkonen off to get Alonso on a year early (it just doesn't make good business sense).

It's made pretty obvious by the fact Santander only signed with McLaren once they had got Alonso - and only stayed on board when they realised that Lewis Hamilton was a great way into the UK banking market.


I also believe that Raikkonen and Alonso are evenly matched, which is one of the reasons why I think the pairing Raikkonen - Ferrari did not work. Whether it was a "racing incident" or one part was at fault, I just don't know. But I suppose that everybody (more so, their fans) expected more from that relationship. I don't mean more in terms of championships (that always depends on the competence; both 2008 and this year championship seem to be a scramble among drivers trying not to win the championship, while 2005 championship was a battle between two sharply focused drivers), but more in the sense of performance.

I was surprised when Raikkonen decided to exercise his option to unilaterally extend his contract with Ferrari, because I thought that the relationship was clearly not a fruitful one. I was also surprised when Ferrari opted by honouring that unilateral extension by paying it out, instead of by actually having Raikkonen on the team. It was an awful lot of money to pay to get out of a relationship, but maybe Ferrari felt that it was not worth it to extend a sub-optimal relationship for one more year.

Which leads me to the "Ferrari decision was purely a commercial one". In the way that I see that reasoning used, it seems to me that it means that Ferrari wanted / needed Santander money, and so they had to put up with whatever wishes Santander had (in this case, changing Raikkonen for Alonso). I don't believe that is the case, for the reasons I will later expose, but even if it were, there would be nothing untowardly in changing one driver for another that evenly matches the first one. That is the prerogative of the team. And there is nothing untowardly when one of the parties to an agreement exercises its option to unilaterally extend it, and the other decides to pay out that party because it is not interested in extending the relationship. Both parties fulfil their obligations.

But I digress. I said that I did not believe that Ferrari was forced by Santander to swap Raikkonen for Alonso for commercial reasons. First of all, if I am not wrong, the money Santander pays for having its name on the car goes directly to Philip Morris, and Ferrari does not see a penny of it. Philip Morris has a multi-year agreement with Ferrari by which it pays Ferrari some USD 100 – 130 M a year, and it “owns” and “sells” advertising space in the car. It was thought that this agreement would come to an end in 2011 and that Santander could become a more standard “Title Sponsor” of Ferrari, but Philip Morris decided against this, and the long standing partnership between Ferrari and Philip Morris will go on. In a nutshell, Ferrari does not profit from having Santander’s logo on the car. That Santander money goes to Philip Morris.

It is true that there are other Santander funds that were made available to pay the Alonso – Raikkonen swap. But those funds were used to pay for something that Ferrari wanted. It is not as if Santander forced the will of Ferrari, or if Ferrari received funds free disposable funds from Santander for accepting Alonso on the team. Without Santander, Ferrari would have had to wait for a year to get Alonso on board (and during that year lots of things could have happened, by the way) because it would not have had the money to pay Raikkonen out of the extension of their agreement. But that is the only commercial advantage gained by Ferrari by having Santander as main sponsor. The other Santander money goes to Philip Morris, as owner of Ferrari advertising space, so to speak.

So all this talk about obscure commercial interests that cut Raikkonen career short is just not accurate, in my view. Raikkonen was interested in driving one more year for Ferrari (or in getting one more year of his super-salary, a cynical could say), Ferrari was not interested in having Raikkonen one more year, and Santander provided the means to fulfil both parties wishes.

The final result is that Raikkonen got his salary, he had the chance of driving for other F1 top team (McLaren) but declined it to fulfil his dream of rallying, Ferrari got the driver it wished (that, in any case, was evenly matched to the one it had before, so it was not worse off), Alonso is driving for a team that allows him to challenge for a WDC again, and Santander got the advertising it wanted.

How this has embittered Raikkonen fans so much as to be still arguing against Alonso and Santander one year after the fact is something that puzzles me. Why they insist in searching sordid (and unsubstantiated) reasons in the whole transaction I can't understand.

EDIT: Sorry Butoneer, I began writing my long post before you published yours. I'll refrain from talking about Raikkonen here.

Edited by e34, 30 September 2010 - 14:09.


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#5002 DarthRonzo

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 17:17

Alonso is a normal guy.

http://uk.eurosport....normal-guy.html

#5003 e34

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 18:13

Alonso is a normal guy.

http://uk.eurosport....normal-guy.html


But he is in the wrong business for being a normal guy, isn't he?

Half the world believes he is the love child of Lucifer and some prima donna. And the other half does not believe it, but can imagine it. And what does he do? Saying that the world is wrong. Will he ever manage his public image in any meaningful way? No, because he is a normal guy, and he does not do PR.

Well, he is absolutely entitled to lead the life he wants, and to manage his career as he wants. His career so far has been very successful. But I can't help thinking that antagonizing the press (and he has antagonized both the British and the Spanish press) has costed him some championships and has made his life a lot harder. Heck, even the stiff-upper-lipped McLaren is now making friendly noises in Spain, actively trying to improve their image in Spain with their interviews and reports in La Sexta because it is just insane to alienate people in a sport where public image (and sponsorship) is so important.

Meanwhile, Alonso seems to accept being portrayed as a sort of comical supervillain by the press. And, of course, the press will just obligue, because there is nothing the press likes more than a cliche. And so we have what we had in Valencia: Alonso is royally screwed by the SC, he explodes in public, the press has a field day and the roflcopter roars again in internet. And this routine plays on again and again. In fact, the only disadvantaged party is Alonso, because the press can fill lots and lots of pages with the usual cliches: toys, prams, primadonnas, number-ones, you name it; Alonso's anti-supporters enjoy the gag and Alonso himself is the only one paying the bill, by way of having to spend two years in an underperforming Renault and having to fight with the press he can't be bothered to manage because he is a normal guy.

I suppose he considers it to be a trait of integrity. As I see it, it is refusing to see the reality. He famously said that "F1 is not a sport anymore". It is about time he realises it is not a place for normal guys, either.

#5004 arknor

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 18:30

But he is in the wrong business for being a normal guy, isn't he?

Half the world believes he is the love child of Lucifer and some prima donna. And the other half does not believe it, but can imagine it. And what does he do? Saying that the world is wrong. Will he ever manage his public image in any meaningful way? No, because he is a normal guy, and he does not do PR.

Well, he is absolutely entitled to lead the life he wants, and to manage his career as he wants. His career so far has been very successful. But I can't help thinking that antagonizing the press (and he has antagonized both the British and the Spanish press) has costed him some championships and has made his life a lot harder. Heck, even the stiff-upper-lipped McLaren is now making friendly noises in Spain, actively trying to improve their image in Spain with their interviews and reports in La Sexta because it is just insane to alienate people in a sport where public image (and sponsorship) is so important.

Meanwhile, Alonso seems to accept being portrayed as a sort of comical supervillain by the press. And, of course, the press will just obligue, because there is nothing the press likes more than a cliche. And so we have what we had in Valencia: Alonso is royally screwed by the SC, he explodes in public, the press has a field day and the roflcopter roars again in internet. And this routine plays on again and again. In fact, the only disadvantaged party is Alonso, because the press can fill lots and lots of pages with the usual cliches: toys, prams, primadonnas, number-ones, you name it; Alonso's anti-supporters enjoy the gag and Alonso himself is the only one paying the bill, by way of having to spend two years in an underperforming Renault and having to fight with the press he can't be bothered to manage because he is a normal guy.

I suppose he considers it to be a trait of integrity. As I see it, it is refusing to see the reality. He famously said that "F1 is not a sport anymore". It is about time he realises it is not a place for normal guys, either.

was it silverstone after qualifying or the race where i think alonso , webber and vetel? were waving to the crowd and alonso was saying go gome now :rotfl:

#5005 Anssi

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 18:35

I agree too that Kimi and Alonso are very even when it comes to driving a F1 car.

Saying one has half-a-second or so over the other in lap times is nuts. I bet let's ask this from the drivers and they say the same. In fact I think many of them have said this kind of thing already so it's up to you to either believe them or think they don't know what they are talking about.

Both are great car racing drivers and both should be respected for that by car racing fans.

#5006 Smile17

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 18:42

But he is in the wrong business for being a normal guy, isn't he?

Half the world believes he is the love child of Lucifer and some prima donna. And the other half does not believe it, but can imagine it. And what does he do? Saying that the world is wrong. Will he ever manage his public image in any meaningful way? No, because he is a normal guy, and he does not do PR.

Well, he is absolutely entitled to lead the life he wants, and to manage his career as he wants. His career so far has been very successful. But I can't help thinking that antagonizing the press (and he has antagonized both the British and the Spanish press) has costed him some championships and has made his life a lot harder. Heck, even the stiff-upper-lipped McLaren is now making friendly noises in Spain, actively trying to improve their image in Spain with their interviews and reports in La Sexta because it is just insane to alienate people in a sport where public image (and sponsorship) is so important.

Meanwhile, Alonso seems to accept being portrayed as a sort of comical supervillain by the press. And, of course, the press will just obligue, because there is nothing the press likes more than a cliche. And so we have what we had in Valencia: Alonso is royally screwed by the SC, he explodes in public, the press has a field day and the roflcopter roars again in internet. And this routine plays on again and again. In fact, the only disadvantaged party is Alonso, because the press can fill lots and lots of pages with the usual cliches: toys, prams, primadonnas, number-ones, you name it; Alonso's anti-supporters enjoy the gag and Alonso himself is the only one paying the bill, by way of having to spend two years in an underperforming Renault and having to fight with the press he can't be bothered to manage because he is a normal guy.

I suppose he considers it to be a trait of integrity. As I see it, it is refusing to see the reality. He famously said that "F1 is not a sport anymore". It is about time he realises it is not a place for normal guys, either.


Wow you make it sound a lot worse than it is. It's only a part of the Brittish fans/media who seem to hate him, nothing more. Are you only following the Brittish press or what?
Oh and Kimi is certainly not at the same level as Alonso, you lost me there.


#5007 Smile17

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 18:46

was it silverstone after qualifying or the race where i think alonso , webber and vetel? were waving to the crowd and alonso was saying go home now :rotfl:


Yes that's true, but he was not talking to the crowd. Don't take things too seriously.. it's just made up stuff.
And even if he said that, so what? I think it would have been quite funny.

#5008 Anssi

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 18:51

Wow you make it sound a lot worse than it is. It's only a part of the Brittish fans/media who seem to hate him, nothing more. Are you only following the Brittish press or what?


A-ha. So it's just the Brittish fans/media who are able to see something bad in Fernando Alonso. Maybve some of them go a bit over the top but it's great it's only limited to Brittish people.


Oh and Kimi is certainly not at the same level as Alonso, you lost me there.


Well that's a nice opinion and you have a right to have it. What would you say about Michael Schumacher? Is he at the same level as Alonso? I remind you that we need to judge their F1 careers in whole so please do that.

#5009 AlanWake

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 20:49

Fernando Alonso: "Right now, at this point of the championship, I'm at a peak - 100 per cent motivated, focused,"

Bring on Suzuka! :clap:

#5010 Hole

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 21:14

You guys really need to leave this Kimi thing behind, in case you didn't noticed most of the so-called Alonso haters are not only some Kimi fans, look closely and you will see some Hamilton fanboys stirring thing up in some threads.


P.S. to all of you Alonso fans and some fellow Kimi fans, take a look at Alonso and Kimi (even after the Alonso to Ferrari was announced in Suzuka), they've always appreciated each other and had respect towards one another in all these years.


I have nothing against Kimi, nor said anything related with him as a person. We were talking about the Alonso haters, I don't care if they are fans of Kimi, Hamilton or Lazy Town, so thanks for the info.

Actually Kimi after Alonso and Jaime he's (was) my favorite F1 driver.

#5011 cardin

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:19

But he is in the wrong business for being a normal guy, isn't he?

Half the world believes he is the love child of Lucifer and some prima donna. And the other half does not believe it, but can imagine it. And what does he do? Saying that the world is wrong. Will he ever manage his public image in any meaningful way? No, because he is a normal guy, and he does not do PR.

Well, he is absolutely entitled to lead the life he wants, and to manage his career as he wants. His career so far has been very successful. But I can't help thinking that antagonizing the press (and he has antagonized both the British and the Spanish press) has costed him some championships and has made his life a lot harder. Heck, even the stiff-upper-lipped McLaren is now making friendly noises in Spain, actively trying to improve their image in Spain with their interviews and reports in La Sexta because it is just insane to alienate people in a sport where public image (and sponsorship) is so important.

Meanwhile, Alonso seems to accept being portrayed as a sort of comical supervillain by the press. And, of course, the press will just obligue, because there is nothing the press likes more than a cliche. And so we have what we had in Valencia: Alonso is royally screwed by the SC, he explodes in public, the press has a field day and the roflcopter roars again in internet. And this routine plays on again and again. In fact, the only disadvantaged party is Alonso, because the press can fill lots and lots of pages with the usual cliches: toys, prams, primadonnas, number-ones, you name it; Alonso's anti-supporters enjoy the gag and Alonso himself is the only one paying the bill, by way of having to spend two years in an underperforming Renault and having to fight with the press he can't be bothered to manage because he is a normal guy.

I suppose he considers it to be a trait of integrity. As I see it, it is refusing to see the reality. He famously said that "F1 is not a sport anymore". It is about time he realises it is not a place for normal guys, either.


Another atempt to portray Alonso as a victm of the evil britsh press. He's never done anything wrong because ... because... he's Alonso the normal guy. What a load of rubish.


#5012 TURU

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:27

Fernando Alonso: "Right now, at this point of the championship, I'm at a peak - 100 per cent motivated, focused,"


Every time I see such a statement from a driver (or any sportsman), I feel something silly and embarrasing coming :drunk: :lol:

Bring on Suzuka :clap:

#5013 kandru

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:49

Another atempt to portray Alonso as a victm of the evil britsh press. He's never done anything wrong because ... because... he's Alonso the normal guy. What a load of rubish.

get a life and forget Alonso

P.S. it describes rather well how Fernando is and his approach towards the press and his F1 life in general

#5014 simba

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 17:29

Alonso in the zone is the best championship driver in F1.

true words, every driver has his trademark and alonsos is surely that one :up:

#5015 Craven Morehead

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:52

He surprised me with his uneven performance this year. Perhaps it was two years of having to overdrive the Renault, and then getting a Ferrari that wasn't quite fast enough. Now that the car is up to speed, we are seeing the kind of metronomically devastating performances that made his first stint at Renault so brilliant (also his brief stay @ Macca, where he was very very good, despite all kinds of 'circumstances').

I think he's settled into this title chase now, and the others will need to be on their toes, because he is capable of doing it week in week out, in a way the others perhaps aren't. He could well win this thing, despite the Redbull being the car of the year.

#5016 as65p

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 18:53

I am not the one obsessed with him, just viewing the big picture from outside


Bear with him, the last weeks were really tough.  ;)

#5017 min12

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 21:06

We were not saying anything mean to Kimi himself but what they Kimi fans would come up with this time :up:

Kimi is overrated but cool, I liked him.

Alonso the "6 tenths" man is more overrated IMO. Some of the stuff Alonso fans come up with is borderline sci-fi and paranoid, e.g. look at his year in McLaren and the excuses made for his failure.

#5018 zeph

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 08:05

So Alonso overreacted when he was at McLaren. He should have gritted his teeth and kept his mouth shut (like Webber when he was outclassed by Vettel last season) and do his talking on the track. He should have bagged the title in '07 and then leave McLaren.

But Webber is older and less prone to emotional outbursts. Alonso was only 25 or 26, with an Iberian temper. Let's see how Hamilton will fare if he is upstaged by a rookie. Still, Alonso reacted badly and it lost him the championship.

Acknowledged. The fact remains, he is still a bloody good driver. When he gets his mojo back, few can catch him. You don't win back-to-back titles if you're a total nincompoop.

I believe that the taste of failure can make him a better driver than he ever was IF he can overcome the negativity it has brought. It seems that another title may help accomplish just that. :)

#5019 kanishkl

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 09:07

Alonso the "6 tenths" man is more overrated IMO. Some of the stuff Alonso fans come up with is borderline sci-fi and paranoid, e.g. look at his year in McLaren and the excuses made for his failure.


Overrated to what extent? Are you referring to extreme posters or how he is generally perceived to be the best driver today (as the current grid has voted him the best)?

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#5020 Massacrator

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 18:56

Lauda refers him as the best current driver too, not that Lauda's opinion matter, but its a +1 for Fernando


'Best driver' Alonso will win 2010 title - Lauda
Niki Lauda has backed Fernando Alonso to win the 2010 world championship.

Spaniard Alonso is 11 points behind championship leader Mark Webber's Red Bull, but the Ferrari driver has won two grands prix on the trot from pole.

Triple world champion Lauda was highly critical of Alonso throughout the Hockenheim team orders affair, but he has now told Osterreich newspaper that the 29-year-old is poised to win a third title.

"Why?" the Austrian asked rhetorically. "Because he has twice been champion, and not by chance. He is the best driver today.

"When you assess together a driver's speed, intelligence, ability to take risks efficiently to score maximum points always, he is simply the best," said Lauda, 61.

Lauda also said Australian Webber has "surprised everyone" this season with his consistency.

But he thinks the Red Bull driver will only beat Alonso if his car is "clearly superior" to the Ferrari.

And despite his misgivings during the team orders saga, Lauda said observers can only respect Ferrari at this decisive phase of the championship because "they will do everything possible to bridge the gap separating them from Red Bull".

1996 world champion Damon Hill, however, fears that Alonso's 2010 title might be tainted by his inherited victory over teammate Felipe Massa in Germany.

"There will be people who feel that points should have been taken away from Ferrari and Alonso," he told the Mail on Sunday.

http://www.motorspor...e.asp?ID=389834

Edited by Massacrator, 04 October 2010 - 18:56.


#5021 Anssi

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 19:44

In Lauda we can trust.

#5022 metz

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 19:52

That's a Lauda nonsense.

#5023 Massacrator

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 20:09

Seems like Lauda medication is working now :rotfl:

#5024 Hollow

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 20:58

ability to take risks efficiently


LOL, Hamilton stock is going down.

#5025 Massacrator

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 21:01

LOL, Hamilton stock is going down.

that one was clearly aimed at him/vettel :lol:

Edited by Massacrator, 04 October 2010 - 21:01.


#5026 Craven Morehead

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 02:36

Alonso the "6 tenths" man is more overrated IMO. Some of the stuff Alonso fans come up with is borderline sci-fi and paranoid, e.g. look at his year in McLaren and the excuses made for his failure.


So.. missing the world championship by one point in the closest three-way title fight in 21 years is a 'failure'? OK, whatever floats your boat. :D

#5027 topical

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 07:06

1996 world champion Damon Hill, however, fears that Alonso's 2010 title might be tainted by his inherited victory over teammate Felipe Massa in Germany.

"There will be people who feel that points should have been taken away from Ferrari and Alonso," he told the Mail on Sunday.

http://www.motorspor...e.asp?ID=389834


Bloody hell, we've got 4 (3?) races left in the closest season in living memory and the article speaks as if Alonso is a dead certainty to win the title. Webber is still the big favourite - 11 point lead, fresh engine at his disposal and almost certainly the fastest car in the next races. A bad result for Alonso in Suzuka and a good result for Webber would more or less seal it.

As for the haters going on and on about the 7 points - well what do you expect. If Alonso wins his 3rd WDC, they'll have little else to bleat about while taking their bitter medicine.


#5028 Ferrari2183

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 09:38

Latest diary entry

#5029 tifosiMac

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 09:45

As for the haters going on and on about the 7 points - well what do you expect. If Alonso wins his 3rd WDC, they'll have little else to bleat about while taking their bitter medicine.

The irony is people cannot have an opinion which is not entirely positive and not be labelled as a 'hater'.

#5030 Watkins74

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 17:57

Any thoughts on how Fernando's engine strategy will be in the last 4 races?

A. Run hard all weekend, if they blow, they blow.

B. Reduced laps in practice, with the engine in a more conserative mode .

C. Limited laps, Massa will have to do the data collection on Fridays.

D. Similar to A but just use up these engines , try to get a lead in the WDC, take the penalty and start around 12th and have a fresh engine for the last race ot two.

I know it's speculating but I was just interested in some opinions.

#5031 Ferrari2183

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 18:21

Any thoughts on how Fernando's engine strategy will be in the last 4 races?

A. Run hard all weekend, if they blow, they blow.

B. Reduced laps in practice, with the engine in a more conserative mode .

C. Limited laps, Massa will have to do the data collection on Fridays.

D. Similar to A but just use up these engines , try to get a lead in the WDC, take the penalty and start around 12th and have a fresh engine for the last race ot two.

I know it's speculating but I was just interested in some opinions.

A. They will run the race engines hard but manage them once he settles/consolidates his position. Limited FP3 running used to fine tune quali setup, with both quali and race setup happening during FP1 & 2 when the practice engine is used.

B/C. Practically the same thing. He probably will limit the mileage but he needs to get his setup right. He won't be very fast using Massa setup.

D. I don't think they are even considering that option.

#5032 AlanWake

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 18:35

Fernando celebrating his win in Suzuka 2006: http://www.youtube.c...player_embedded

To me, he was always great to watch after winning a race in 2005 and 2006 :clap: . This year, he is MUCH more discreet with his celebrations so it is obvious he has matured :smoking:

#5033 robefc

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 18:37

He surprised me with his uneven performance this year. Perhaps it was two years of having to overdrive the Renault, and then getting a Ferrari that wasn't quite fast enough. Now that the car is up to speed, we are seeing the kind of metronomically devastating performances that made his first stint at Renault so brilliant (also his brief stay @ Macca, where he was very very good, despite all kinds of 'circumstances').

I think he's settled into this title chase now, and the others will need to be on their toes, because he is capable of doing it week in week out, in a way the others perhaps aren't. He could well win this thing, despite the Redbull being the car of the year.


I party agree, partly disagree. As a hamilton fan, alonso is easily the driver I fear most if you take the car out of the equation, wasn't the case for a time this season but as you mention I think his 'unevenness' was out of character.

However, hamilton's driving all season up until monza was virtually flawless, a couple of quali sessions aside, and his 9 podiums in a row at the start of 2007 showed outstounding consistency for a rookie. Perhaps he hasn't shown he can go an entire season with minimal mistakes yet or completely keep his cool in a championship run in, but if he doesn't make any more errors in the next 4 races and maximises the car potential then 2010 will be a pretty impressive season from that perspective.

I think generally hamilton is a higher risk driver than alonso though, at least now, so perhaps his performances will always be a bit more volatile, both from a positive and negative point of view.

#5034 Mandzipop

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 19:04

Any thoughts on how Fernando's engine strategy will be in the last 4 races?

A. Run hard all weekend, if they blow, they blow.

B. Reduced laps in practice, with the engine in a more conserative mode .

C. Limited laps, Massa will have to do the data collection on Fridays.

D. Similar to A but just use up these engines , try to get a lead in the WDC, take the penalty and start around 12th and have a fresh engine for the last race ot two.

I know it's speculating but I was just interested in some opinions.


Spa and Monza engines for quali and race (only done one race each), Singapore engine for free practice. At Abu Dhabi I would expect them to use whichever engine that did Brazil in free practice.

#5035 AlanWake

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 20:51

Flavio Briatore:

"He's the strongest, someone who knows how to take the team in the right direction. Without him Renault would not have taken two titles," he said.

"Alonso is the world class racing driver we know, and Ferrari has demonstrated to be a great team in the last two races. Fernando contributed with his speed and his class, but the men in the garage added their ability in the pit stops. And the engineers have brought car developments that worked."

"Felipe is good and quick, but he must understand that he has a special driver next to him. If I was in his shoes I'd take it easy."


http://www.autosport...rt.php/id/87238

There are very few drivers in the F1 History that would have won the 2006 WDC driving a Renault F1 car against Michael Schumacher, Ferrari and the FIA (the ban of the mass damper, a ridiculous penalty in Monza 2006, etc) IMHO, of course.

#5036 Lokt

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 22:41

Flavio Briatore:

"He's the strongest, someone who knows how to take the team in the right direction. Without him Renault would not have taken two titles," he said.

"Alonso is the world class racing driver we know, and Ferrari has demonstrated to be a great team in the last two races. Fernando contributed with his speed and his class, but the men in the garage added their ability in the pit stops. And the engineers have brought car developments that worked."

"Felipe is good and quick, but he must understand that he has a special driver next to him. If I was in his shoes I'd take it easy."


http://www.autosport...rt.php/id/87238

There are very few drivers in the F1 History that would have won the 2006 WDC driving a Renault F1 car against Michael Schumacher, Ferrari and the FIA (the ban of the mass damper, a ridiculous penalty in Monza 2006, etc) IMHO, of course.


Man with praise like that Alonso should hire him as his manager!........ oh wait.

#5037 ViMaMo

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 07:27

So Lewis seems human after all after his crash in FP. Alonso's crash in Monaco FP was used as a precedent to bring him down by certain fans. Now what do we have from Lewis...... crunch time...... and he is making very very costly mistakes.

#5038 2ms

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 07:32

So Lewis seems human after all after his crash in FP. Alonso's crash in Monaco FP was used as a precedent to bring him down by certain fans. Now what do we have from Lewis...... crunch time...... and he is making very very costly mistakes.


Some of us think they've both driven like crap for WDC contenders (along with the whole rest of lot like Vettel and Webber) this season and miss the days where F1 had brilliant driving. If Hamilton and Alonso are really the best F1's got then sucks to be F1 fan these days. Here's hoping MGP and Renault have competitive cars next year and we discover that Rosberg and Kubica turn out to be capable show how it's really done.

#5039 TIFOlonSO

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 08:16

Don't worry much 2ms, I'm sure Kimi will drive next year the 2ond Renault and end the drought of brilliant driving.

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#5040 Buttoneer

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 11:18

So Lewis seems human after all after his crash in FP. Alonso's crash in Monaco FP was used as a precedent to bring him down by certain fans. Now what do we have from Lewis...... crunch time...... and he is making very very costly mistakes.

Second thread you've posted this in, and second thread where I'll take the opportunity to reply.

Alonso's FP3 error clearly compromised his race. No question - the effect was catastrophic and obvious.

Hamilton's error today will probably have an effect on fine tuning the McLaren setup, of that there's no doubt, but how much? You can't see or tell how much compromise there is and if the weekend otherwise works out they will be somewhere near the front.

So you say 'very costly' and I say 'prove it'. I can certainly show you how costly Alonso's error was.

Of course there's a lot of the weekend left and plenty of time for either driver to screw things up.

#5041 Zhuk

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 11:45

It's probably going to be wet and Alonso needs a great weekend and maximize the potential of the F10. 3rd place at least should be the result he should be aiming for!

#5042 fabr68

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 11:58

Second thread you've posted this in, and second thread where I'll take the opportunity to reply.

Alonso's FP3 error clearly compromised his race. No question - the effect was catastrophic and obvious.

Hamilton's error today will probably have an effect on fine tuning the McLaren setup, of that there's no doubt, but how much? You can't see or tell how much compromise there is and if the weekend otherwise works out they will be somewhere near the front.

So you say 'very costly' and I say 'prove it'. I can certainly show you how costly Alonso's error was.

Of course there's a lot of the weekend left and plenty of time for either driver to screw things up.


Maybe somewhat costly?
http://www.f1complet...-hamiltons-wing

In any case accidents happen. I never thought less of Alonso or Hamilton due to their accidents in Monaco and Suzuka respectively. The real test comes down on how quickly the driver reacts to come out of the mess. If Hamilton does what Alonso did, he will be fine.

#5043 TIFOlonSO

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 12:30

:/
If it was Horner who bosses Mclaren then it would be simple - change winds on cars 1-2. Damn Mclaren strategy - will cost them the title.

#5044 as65p

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 10:23

Hamilton's error today will probably have an effect on fine tuning the McLaren setup, of that there's no doubt, but how much? You can't see or tell how much compromise there is and if the weekend otherwise works out they will be somewhere near the front.

So you say 'very costly' and I say 'prove it'. I can certainly show you how costly Alonso's error was.


There you go. Five Place Grid Penalty for gearbox change.

That's costly alright, I guess.

#5045 e34

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 10:32

There you go. Five Place Grid Penalty for gearbox change.

That's costly alright, I guess.


That's ether a mistake by f1fanatic (it is not reported anywhere else up to this moment) or the consequence of McLaren wanting to use the new gearbox on Friday, when you do not need to use a race gearbox.

That may be due to they using a newly designed gearbox to go with the new engine mappings, or to they wanting to give the gearbox a proper running-in, if that makes any sense.

Otherwise, I don't undestand the penalty, because supposedly on Friday you may use non-racing equipment, so you don't risk the official gear. I suppose they will explain the reason of the penalty, if one has been really handed, because it would be a serious blunder by the team.

#5046 keeppushingurep1

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 10:44

Second thread you've posted this in, and second thread where I'll take the opportunity to reply.

Alonso's FP3 error clearly compromised his race. No question - the effect was catastrophic and obvious.

Hamilton's error today will probably have an effect on fine tuning the McLaren setup, of that there's no doubt, but how much? You can't see or tell how much compromise there is and if the weekend otherwise works out they will be somewhere near the front.

So you say 'very costly' and I say 'prove it'. I can certainly show you how costly Alonso's error was.

Of course there's a lot of the weekend left and plenty of time for either driver to screw things up.




u re so partial

this is just a question,

is the crash the reason why they changed the gearbox??

#5047 HPT

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 11:29

There you go. Five Place Grid Penalty for gearbox change.

That's costly alright, I guess.


It doesn't sound like the gearbox change has anything to do with his crash though.

#5048 keeppushingurep1

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 11:29

That's ether a mistake by f1fanatic (it is not reported anywhere else up to this moment) or the consequence of McLaren wanting to use the new gearbox on Friday, when you do not need to use a race gearbox.

That may be due to they using a newly designed gearbox to go with the new engine mappings, or to they wanting to give the gearbox a proper running-in, if that makes any sense.

Otherwise, I don't undestand the penalty, because supposedly on Friday you may use non-racing equipment, so you don't risk the official gear. I suppose they will explain the reason of the penalty, if one has been really handed, because it would be a serious blunder by the team.



it s confirmed by autosport, but they dont say it s a cosequence of the accident..

#5049 Massacrator

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 11:32

This is Fernando Alonso's thread...

#5050 e34

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 11:35

it s confirmed by autosport, but they dont say it s a cosequence of the accident..


Yes, for all we know it would seem that McLaren did not take the chance to fit a new gearbox in Hamilton's car after his Singapore DNF, and now that decision has backfired big time. It would seem that the problem developed straight after turning on Hamilton's car in FP3, and was later confirmed during Qualifying (non) session. Alternatively, they fitted a new gearbox and it was defective.

Their only solace is that, at least, they have the chance to qualify tomorrow.

And for Alonso, how does this change his approach to tomorrow qualifying? We must remember that any serious crash at tomorrow qualifying could jeopardize the race itself. Unless they are, exceptionally, allowed to have the third car semi-ready, taking into account that there is only a 4 hour gap between qualy and race.

Edited by e34, 09 October 2010 - 11:38.