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Fernando Alonso thread [merged]


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#9601 yr

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 19:54

Imagine if there was a real good driver in Ferrari who could have found the potent of that car even earlier, since 2008 to be specific.  ;)


That would have been great. Luckily though, there was a driver who won the WDC with Ferrari after Schumi. Imagine if this - seemingly - neverending dry-season ( =no-WDCs) would have continued ever since Schumi left the team... and sadly there doesnt seem to be a WDC in sight in near future with current drivers, so thank God for that one WDC which Kimi secured for Ferrari after Schumi era, no?

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#9602 Hole

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 20:01

Yeah, I agree. Anything better than Massa (in his current form) would spoil the team spirit rightaway. For example, rememeber how Trully beat shit out of Alonso when they were teamed up in Renault? If memory serves, Trulli even won one race (Monaco?) that year, while Alonso won nothing. :lol:
But then of course, Briatore needed to do something to protect his investment (Alonso) so he sacked Trulli, that was hilarious thing to do (sacking your better driver in order to make your second driver look better) , I am sure you remember that one.


What's your excuse for 2003 when Alonso beat Trulli fair and square and got the first win for Renault in a lot of years... Also, in 2004 ALonso had 5 retirements while Trulli had 3. Agreed that Alonso had some retirements due his fault but then again all drivers have bad years. Regarding the skills you cannot critize him neither now nor back in 2004.

Awwww crap, I got dragged again. :o

---

Btw, nice that Alonso is second in the F1 fanatic season. Many people with a lot of resintements stated Alonso's arrival to Ferrari was a fail but with two very complicated seasons with a very dominant RBR and still he managed to push his Ferrari to second position which is nice given the circumstances. Now Alonso just need to get it again this year also in the WDC standings. Perhaps with some chances of getting the championship just like last year? Let's see how Germany turns out.

#9603 yr

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 20:14

Awwww crap, I got dragged again. :o


:lol: Isnt that just the main reason why these forums exist?

#9604 as65p

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 20:14

Yeah, I agree. Anything better than Massa (in his current form) would spoil the team spirit rightaway. For example, rememeber how Trully beat shit out of Alonso when they were teamed up in Renault? If memory serves, Trulli even won one race (Monaco?) that year, while Alonso won nothing. :lol:
But then of course, Briatore needed to do something to protect his investment (Alonso) so he sacked Trulli, that was hilarious thing to do (sacking your better driver in order to make your second driver look better) , I am sure you remember that one.


I remember it in the same way as when Massa was beating the shit out of that finnish guy. Then again I heard that he was drunk most of the time, so it probably wasn't such a great achievment, and thankfully in that case the right guy was finally sacked... :D

(Hope you can take as good as you give?  ;) )

#9605 Buttoneer

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 21:43

Posts deleted.

Not a Kimi thread. Not a 'praise' thread either, so please do not labour under the misapprehension that criticism is unwelcome here.

#9606 GerhardBerger

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 22:49

Yeah, I agree. Anything better than Massa (in his current form) would spoil the team spirit rightaway. For example, rememeber how Trully beat shit out of Alonso when they were teamed up in Renault? If memory serves, Trulli even won one race (Monaco?) that year, while Alonso won nothing. :lol:
But then of course, Briatore needed to do something to protect his investment (Alonso) so he sacked Trulli, that was hilarious thing to do (sacking your better driver in order to make your second driver look better) , I am sure you remember that one.


Alonso scored more points than Trulli in 2003 and 2004.

Briatore had a falling out with Trulli after Magny Cours - this is what led to his dismissal (nothing to do with Alonso).

#9607 Kohque

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 02:29

:well: Probably best for a possible WDC challenge from Alonso, but also a bit of a bore at the same time.

Just happy for Massa :) . I think he can still do better than this year, just like he showed going from 2007 to 2008.

Edited by Kohque, 20 July 2011 - 02:29.


#9608 Kohque

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 03:16

More about Alonso's drive with the Ferrari 375:

“He had to learn to bump-start it first,” laughed Robert Dean, who cares for Ecclestone’s car collection. “As we pushed-started him on the grid he casually looked over his shoulder and said ‘tell me what to do’. We were shouting ‘clutch! drop the clutch!’ but he got away beautifully. He was great, he followed instructions to the letter, and I don’t think he missed a single gear during his laps. I was very impressed at how easily he got to know the 375, but I did warn him about the brakes and double de-clutching when changing down. I’m not sure he really used the brakes – except once when he was so busy waving to the crowd he ran a bit wide.”


http://www.motorspor...s-ferrari-form/

I had to look around about the double de-clutch (From Wikipedia). Quite interesting:

1. The clutch pedal is pressed, the throttle is released, and the gearbox is shifted into neutral.
2. The clutch pedal is then released. As the engine idles with no load, the RPM will decrease until they are at a level suitable for shifting into the next gear.
3. The driver then depresses the clutch again and shifts into the next gear. The whole maneuver can, with practice, take no more than a fraction of a second, and the result is a very smooth gear change.

#9609 Slowinfastout

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 05:58

I had to look around about the double de-clutch (From Wikipedia). Quite interesting:

1. The clutch pedal is pressed, the throttle is released, and the gearbox is shifted into neutral.
2. The clutch pedal is then released. As the engine idles with no load, the RPM will decrease until they are at a level suitable for shifting into the next gear.
3. The driver then depresses the clutch again and shifts into the next gear. The whole maneuver can, with practice, take no more than a fraction of a second, and the result is a very smooth gear change.


Nothing an obese redneck trucker isn't doing all day long..



#9610 crespo

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 06:01

Nothing an obese redneck trucker isn't doing all day long..

Not with the pedals reversed... or in a very expensive 1950s race car... at Silverstone in front of thousands... for the first time he's been in that car...

#9611 Slowinfastout

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 06:11

Not with the pedals reversed... or in a very expensive 1950s race car... at Silverstone in front of thousands... for the first time he's been in that car...


Ok, I'll give you all that.

But I did plenty of double-declutch myself, so I had to somehow bring Alonso to my level, if only a little bit :)

It's nothing special, especially if you're not going 10/10..

#9612 gillesthegenius

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 06:40

nearly 0.6s faster :lol:


I think he's finally regained the 0.6 seconds he left at mclaren.;)

On a more serious note, it was a brilliant drive by Alonso. Probably the best performance of the year so far.

Edited by gillesthegenius, 20 July 2011 - 06:55.


#9613 Kohque

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 06:45

Ok, I'll give you all that.

But I did plenty of double-declutch myself, so I had to somehow bring Alonso to my level, if only a little bit :)

It's nothing special, especially if you're not going 10/10..

Just thought it was interesting (never heard of the de-clutch system before, but thanks for the extra info about trucks). I will bring some criticism of Alonso if I see it too  ;) . If well argued, negative opinions can be often more interesting, as long as it is about him and not to some external issue (i.e. off-throttle ban) or the dead boring whatevergates.

#9614 gillesthegenius

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 06:51

There is a rumour flying around it is.


Wonder who is so jobless to spread such a rumour...
:confused: :confused: :confused:

Edited by gillesthegenius, 20 July 2011 - 06:53.


#9615 Clatter

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 12:38

More about Alonso's drive with the Ferrari 375:



http://www.motorspor...s-ferrari-form/

I had to look around about the double de-clutch (From Wikipedia). Quite interesting:

1. The clutch pedal is pressed, the throttle is released, and the gearbox is shifted into neutral.
2. The clutch pedal is then released. As the engine idles with no load, the RPM will decrease until they are at a level suitable for shifting into the next gear.
3. The driver then depresses the clutch again and shifts into the next gear. The whole maneuver can, with practice, take no more than a fraction of a second, and the result is a very smooth gear change.


It's really nothing special and something I've, and I'm sure many others, have had to do in the older cars that we have owned. It's not difficult and doesn't take hours of practise.

#9616 fabr68

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 12:52

That would have been great. Luckily though, there was a driver who won the WDC with Ferrari after Schumi. Imagine if this - seemingly - neverending dry-season ( =no-WDCs) would have continued ever since Schumi left the team... and sadly there doesnt seem to be a WDC in sight in near future with current drivers, so thank God for that one WDC which Kimi secured for Ferrari after Schumi era, no?


The Schumi era and Kimi's one hit wonder were great for Ferrari. But that is the past. Ferrari cannot continue to live their Formula 1 life dreaming about their past.

I disagree with you that there is not a WDC in sight. There was one chance last year and if the car continues to improve there may be one next year. Alonso is probably the best driver Ferrari could have at the moment. All he wants is to win in F1 and nothing else, no other racing series desires or distractions.

#9617 gillesthegenius

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 13:05

The Schumi era and Kimi's one hit wonder were great for Ferrari. But that is the past. Ferrari cannot continue to live their Formula 1 life dreaming about their past.

I disagree with you that there is not a WDC in sight. There was one chance last year and if the car continues to improve there may be one next year. Alonso is probably the best driver Ferrari could have at the moment. All he wants is to win in F1 and nothing else, no other racing series desires or distractions.


Dude, I think he is being a little cheeky, when he says there is not a wdc in sight for ferrari. If I owned Ferrari, one thing that I will be happy about is that in Alonso, I have the best driver on the grid at my disposal.

Besides, calling kimi a one hit wonder is a little harsh imho. If things had panned out a little differently we might be talking about a triple world champion.

#9618 Kohque

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 14:30

It's really nothing special and something I've, and I'm sure many others, have had to do in the older cars that we have owned. It's not difficult and doesn't take hours of practise.

I believe you. :)

#9619 kosmos

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 16:02

The Schumi era and Kimi's one hit wonder were great for Ferrari. But that is the past. Ferrari cannot continue to live their Formula 1 life dreaming about their past.

Alonso is probably the best driver Ferrari could have at the moment.


At the moment? :rotfl: , Alonso fits in Ferrari like a glove, driving skills, leadership, winning mentality, comple package, experience, latin character, commitment to the brand, hunger for more victories and titles after a long period of nothing and so on. And the best thing is that with only one year and a half, he already proved to Ferrari and Ferrari fans that he is the man to have in Ferrari.


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#9620 Anssi

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 17:49

More about Alonso's drive with the Ferrari 375:



http://www.motorspor...s-ferrari-form/

I had to look around about the double de-clutch (From Wikipedia). Quite interesting:

1. The clutch pedal is pressed, the throttle is released, and the gearbox is shifted into neutral.
2. The clutch pedal is then released. As the engine idles with no load, the RPM will decrease until they are at a level suitable for shifting into the next gear.
3. The driver then depresses the clutch again and shifts into the next gear. The whole maneuver can, with practice, take no more than a fraction of a second, and the result is a very smooth gear change.



The part in bold part sounds like BS. I apply throttle in double de-clutching when the gears are in neutral and when the clutch isn't pressed.

I sometimes tested my road car without using the clutch by carefully adapting the engine speed for every gear change. The gear changes go surprisingly smooth once you find the right speed for the engine for the particular situation. I certainly don't do this often but at least I know I can do it in case the clutch can't be used for some reason.

I originally started doing double de-clutching in the military driving a USSR-made off-road truck. I think it is necessary with that vehicle - many other people didn't think so... many broken gearboxes.

#9621 Slowinfastout

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 18:04

Without synchros (crash box) the revs definitely need to match or it's just gonna grind. The wikipedia wording is shoddy but what they're saying is accurate.

In your road car without the clutch, you also have to match the revs, and it's not grinding because you're leaning on the synchros waiting for it to engage when the RPM will fall in the correct range.

---

Oh and to be on topic, Alonso used to know how to wear a cap:
Posted Image

What happened??

Edited by Slowinfastout, 20 July 2011 - 18:08.


#9622 Kohque

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 20:05

The part in bold part sounds like BS. I apply throttle in double de-clutching when the gears are in neutral and when the clutch isn't pressed.

I sometimes tested my road car without using the clutch by carefully adapting the engine speed for every gear change. The gear changes go surprisingly smooth once you find the right speed for the engine for the particular situation. I certainly don't do this often but at least I know I can do it in case the clutch can't be used for some reason.

I originally started doing double de-clutching in the military driving a USSR-made off-road truck. I think it is necessary with that vehicle - many other people didn't think so... many broken gearboxes.

I dunno. I have just discovered is still in use. And now I am discovering is as common as apple pie. :lol:

That reminds me to last year in Malaysia, when Alonso drove with no clutch:

I had no clutch during the race, so I had to brake in a weird way. I had to first gear down and then push the throttle hard so it would engage the gear for that corner.


http://www.formula1b...with-no-clutch/

I still don't get it. He was able to go down to first gear without clutch, but since the shifting is electronic, he instead rev up to engage the first gear, is that it? Shouldn't have that destroy the gearbox after few laps? And then, how could he keep the pace? It should have taken a bit longer to engage the gears and after quite a few corners it would have added up to slower laps, no?

Edited by Kohque, 21 July 2011 - 03:02.


#9623 kissTheApex

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 20:11

http://www.formula1b...with-no-clutch/

I still don't get it. He was able to go down to first gear without clutch, but since the shifting is electronic, he instead rev up to engage the first gear, is that it? Shouldn't have that destroy the gearbox after few laps? And then, how did he could keep the pace? It should have taken a bit longer to engage the gears and after quite a few corners it would have added up to slower laps, no?


Read it as "First, I had to shift down, then push on the accelerator so that the gear engages." Not that he is shifting to first gear everytime. Cannot comment on the electronics of how it works though.

#9624 crespo

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 20:17

I dunno. I have just discovered is still in use. I am now I am discovering is as common as apple pie. :lol:

That reminds me to last year in Malaysia, when Alonso drove with no clutch:



http://www.formula1b...with-no-clutch/

I still don't get it. He was able to go down to first gear without clutch, but since the shifting is electronic, he instead rev up to engage the first gear, is that it? Shouldn't have that destroy the gearbox after few laps? And then, how did he could keep the pace? It should have taken a bit longer to engage the gears and after quite a few corners it would have added up to slower laps, no?

I believe what happened in Malaysia last year was that Alonso had to rev-match the downshifts manually due to an issue with the clutch (something affecting the component that automatically blips the throttle on downshifts). Had his clutch "broken" (direct translation - the source of the misunderstanding, I suspect) he wouldn't had even been able to move.

Because of this, he lost the ability to engine-brake, meaning he had to use more of his brakes more of the time. Although he adapted to this within a couple of laps and ended up getting a good grasp on it, I can't imagine the kind of stresses the engine was put under whenever Alonso couldn't get the rev-match 100% on, hence the engine failure in the late stages of the race. That's the kind of Alonso moment I wish we could inspect more closely, just to get a clear picture of what he had to adapt to. Stunning drive from him that day, really, almost matching Massa for pace - least-deserved DNF of the season IMO :\

(I'm still not 100% clear what happened to his car, so this is mostly pure speculation on my part).

#9625 Kohque

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 02:55

Read it as "First, I had to shift down, then push on the accelerator so that the gear engages." Not that he is shifting to first gear everytime. Cannot comment on the electronics of how it works though.

Right, thanks :) . That makes more sense


#9626 Kohque

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 04:20

I believe what happened in Malaysia last year was that Alonso had to rev-match the downshifts manually due to an issue with the clutch (something affecting the component that automatically blips the throttle on downshifts). Had his clutch "broken" (direct translation - the source of the misunderstanding, I suspect) he wouldn't had even been able to move.

Because of this, he lost the ability to engine-brake, meaning he had to use more of his brakes more of the time. Although he adapted to this within a couple of laps and ended up getting a good grasp on it, I can't imagine the kind of stresses the engine was put under whenever Alonso couldn't get the rev-match 100% on, hence the engine failure in the late stages of the race. That's the kind of Alonso moment I wish we could inspect more closely, just to get a clear picture of what he had to adapt to. Stunning drive from him that day, really, almost matching Massa for pace - least-deserved DNF of the season IMO :\

(I'm still not 100% clear what happened to his car, so this is mostly pure speculation on my part).

This is the only thing I have found:

http://www.grandprix...ns/ns22179.html

According to Italian sources, it's quite likely Alonso's engine failure in Malaysia was due to the gearbox problems he had during the entire race. The Spanish driver lost the gearbox-clutch connector as soon as he left the pre-grid on Sunday afternoon and struggled with no clutch on downshifts during the entire race. As he explained shortly after retiring, "I had to brake all the time in a weird way. I first had to get the gears down and then push the throttle hard so it would engage in the gear I wanted for each corner."

It's highly likely that while learning how to drive the car in such an unusual way Alonso may have over-revved the engine a couple of times, and it certainly looked like he couldn't get any gear engaged when he overshot his braking points while trying to pass Button just seconds before his retirement. When he finally got a gear in, Alonso's engine started to smoke and blew up in the next couple of seconds, so it's expected that when the engine is analyzed in Maranello the Italians will find out there was nothing wrong with the unit as such, but that it was the clutch problem that caused it to fail.


So, according to this article he really had no clutch and was 'forcing' the changes by sort of engaging the gears 'by pushing manually' like we sometimes do with the gear stick when we don't open completely the clutch (?), but using the throttle instead. That engine and gearbox must have been almost bomb proof :lol:

Edited by Kohque, 21 July 2011 - 04:21.


#9627 Kohque

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 04:50

Latest entry from Alonso's blog:

http://www.ferrari.c...of-ferrari.aspx



#9628 puxanando

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 06:31

Webber :Ferrari and Fernando were very, very competitive there (Silverstone).
At Silverstone, Fernando was close to our pace in qualifying for the first time really and then they beat us fair and square in the race.

Fernando's a wise old fox and he will definitely be a force in the next two races. I remember racing him back in Formula 3000 at the Hungaroring, which hosts the Hungarian Grand Prix the week after Germany, and he has always been very, very fast there. He is not too dusty around the Nurburgring either.


:up: Webber is an old wise man......

#9629 e34

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 07:46

This is the only thing I have found:

http://www.grandprix...ns/ns22179.html



So, according to this article he really had no clutch and was 'forcing' the changes by sort of engaging the gears 'by pushing manually' like we sometimes do with the gear stick when we don't open completely the clutch (?), but using the throttle instead. That engine and gearbox must have been almost bomb proof :lol:


He drove it Adrian Campos style.

It is said that our dear Adrian used to drive his Minardi without using the clutch, because not using the clutch was faster... for the three laps the gearbox and the engine could cope. After several GPs destroying the car, he told his engineers about his technique and they couldn't believe it. Years later, they couldn't believe either how Alonso coped with the Minardi. I suppose there are disbeliefs and disbeliefs...

Adrian seems to be a top bloke, though, and he has spent his whole life pursuing his motorsport dream. It is a pity how he got fooled into the Campos GP / HRT debacle.

#9630 puxanando

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 08:56

HERE you can win a jacket signed by Alonso & Surtees!

#9631 Kohque

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 09:05

He drove it Adrian Campos style.

It is said that our dear Adrian used to drive his Minardi without using the clutch, because not using the clutch was faster... for the three laps the gearbox and the engine could cope. After several GPs destroying the car, he told his engineers about his technique and they couldn't believe it. Years later, they couldn't believe either how Alonso coped with the Minardi. I suppose there are disbeliefs and disbeliefs...

Adrian seems to be a top bloke, though, and he has spent his whole life pursuing his motorsport dream. It is a pity how he got fooled into the Campos GP / HRT debacle.


I guess the engineers didn't talk to him for the rest of the season :lol: . I agree, top notch guy. It would be a great to see him as team manager of a F1 team one day with proper financial backing.

That story is quite similar to the story Adrian himself recalls about Alonso when he used to drive in Formula Nissan for him:

http://www.youtube.c...embedded#at=321 (sorry, my English is not good enough to translate it).

#9632 crespo

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 14:59

This is the only thing I have found:

http://www.grandprix...ns/ns22179.html



So, according to this article he really had no clutch and was 'forcing' the changes by sort of engaging the gears 'by pushing manually' like we sometimes do with the gear stick when we don't open completely the clutch (?), but using the throttle instead. That engine and gearbox must have been almost bomb proof :lol:

That's crazy, thanks for that. Here I was thinking he had to: brake -> clutch-in -> throttle blip -> engage gear -> clutch out (manually, with the clutch paddles on the steering wheel), but he didn't even have control of the clutch? Did I read that right? Mind-boggling.

Edited by crespo, 21 July 2011 - 15:01.


#9633 F1Johnny

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:23

He drove it Adrian Campos style.

It is said that our dear Adrian used to drive his Minardi without using the clutch, because not using the clutch was faster... for the three laps the gearbox and the engine could cope. After several GPs destroying the car, he told his engineers about his technique and they couldn't believe it. Years later, they couldn't believe either how Alonso coped with the Minardi. I suppose there are disbeliefs and disbeliefs...

Adrian seems to be a top bloke, though, and he has spent his whole life pursuing his motorsport dream. It is a pity how he got fooled into the Campos GP / HRT debacle.


I recall hearing that Emerson Fittipaldi in his CART days did not use the clutch either.

#9634 glasgowman

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 19:35

There are a lot of Alonso haters out there this wee blog that goes to show what kinda guy he really is


Fernando goes home

#9635 crespo

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 20:10

There are a lot of Alonso haters out there this wee blog that goes to show what kinda guy he really is


Fernando goes home

He's probably doing that to help the Spanish economy :p

#9636 puxanando

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 21:45

He's probably doing that to help the Spanish economy :p

 ;) NO...he is doing this to be near to his family......

#9637 kosmos

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 04:50

Fernando was part of two events in maranello this week, videos:



Edited by kosmos, 22 July 2011 - 04:50.


#9638 kosmos

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 05:55

Very nice article about Fernando's physical training.

http://www.independe...rs-2318965.html?

I like this quote:

"I know I will never stop trying. I hate losing. That is why I never give up. If I finish a race and I am 100 points behind the championship leader, it doesn't matter because in the next race I will try to win again.

"Everything I have done up to now has been more than worth it – all the sacrifices I have had to make since I was a child. Every drop of sweat along the way has been worth it to get to Formula One, to win."



#9639 YellowHelmet

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 09:18

Very nice article about Fernando's physical training.

http://www.independe...rs-2318965.html?

I like this quote:

thanks for that
it was a nice read :up:

I hope this weekend we will witness another 25 points for Alonso :)

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#9640 AlanWake

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 11:10

Very nice article about Fernando's physical training.

http://www.independe...rs-2318965.html?


Thanks for the article. Very interesting :up:

#9641 YellowHelmet

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 13:47

Regarding the cold tempertaures and the prophecies of alonso, we can be very satisfied.

i know that we have expected front row or even p1, but under those conditions, where ferrari struggles to warm their tyres up, that was the maximum.

nevetheless over a race distance alonso should be their fighting for victory.

EDIT:
i just saw that tommorow not only rain is expected but even colder temperatures :(

Edited by YellowHelmet, 23 July 2011 - 13:48.


#9642 NoDivergence

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 18:35

Well, what kind of driving is this???

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
I don't know whether to laugh or cry

#9643 showtime

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 18:52

Well, what kind of driving is this???


It's called Free Practice


#9644 currupipi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 18:52

Well, what kind of driving is this???

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
I don't know whether to laugh or cry


:lol: yep pretty sloppy


#9645 fabr68

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 19:21

Well, what kind of driving is this???

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
I don't know whether to laugh or cry


Crying about a practice session? :lol:

I am pretty sure, the DRS and other systems in the car needed to be tested in race situations. That is what practice is all about.

#9646 peroa

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 19:43

It's called Free Practice


No, it's called being a prick, it's becoming a bit of a habit...

#9647 jetalt

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 20:01

No, it's called being a prick, it's becoming a bit of a habit...


What's wrong with spicing something the show. :cool:

Edited by jetalt, 23 July 2011 - 20:02.


#9648 peroa

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 20:04

Oh, he can continue, but he shouldn't be whinging when he receives a red card in a meaningless practice session.

#9649 glasgowman

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 20:04

if the race doesn't start under a safety car conditions! I have wee strange feeling that all hell is going to break loose at the first corner tomorrow

Hamilton taking out Vettel or vice versa just hope Alonso can steer clear!

#9650 fabr68

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 21:12

Oh, he can continue, but he shouldn't be whinging when he receives a red card in a meaningless practice session.


He should get reprimands like the other drivers who cause crashes during the races.