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Five German drivers in the top-ten


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#1 Nanni Dietrich

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:05

Last Sunday, five German drivers finished the British Grand Prix at Silverstone in the top-ten:

3rd Nico Rosberg
7th Sebastian Vettel
8th Adrian Sutil
9th Michael Schumacher
10th Nico Hulkenberg

Think this is the first time in Formula 1 history, correct?
Five drivers (or more) of the same country, probably yes, but five Germans?



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#2 David McKinney

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:07

I think you'd have to go back to the pre-F1 era to find anything similar in a Grand Prix

#3 kayemod

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:12

And to extend the original question a little, which is more or less what you said, what about five Frenchmen, or five Britons? Five Americans would be too easy of course, from the years when Indy was a part of the WDC.

#4 Rob

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:54

I'd have thought that five Italians was fairly likely as well.

#5 Rob

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 13:05

And to extend the original question a little, which is more or less what you said, what about five Frenchmen, or five Britons? Five Americans would be too easy of course, from the years when Indy was a part of the WDC.


Five Britons comes fairly early on, in the 1950 British Grand Prix. If you include each driver in a shared drive, it's actually six.

3. Reg Parnell
6. Bob Gerard
7. Cuth Harrison
9. David Hampshire
10. Joe Fry and Brian Shawe Taylor

Five Frenchman can be found in the 1950 French Grand Prix.

4. Robert Manzon
5. Philippe Etancelin and Eugene Chaboud
6. Charles Pozzi and Louis Rosier
8. Yves Giraud Cantabous
9. (Ret) Pierre Levegh

Five Italians in the 1951 French Grand Prix

1. Luigi Fagioli (and Juan Manuel Fangio)
2. Alberto Ascari (and Froilan Gonzalez)
3. Luigi Villoresi
5. Giuseppe Farina
10. Consalvo Sanesi

#6 Tim Murray

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 13:13

Five Britons in the top 10 is fairly common, but there can't be many other instances of five in the top five:

British GP 1965

1. Clark
2. G Hill
3. Surtees
4. Spence
5. Stewart

#7 Rob

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 13:30

I'm still looking but I've only come up with four Germans in the top ten so far.

1960 Italian Grand Prix

5. Wolfgang von Trips
6. Hans Herrmann
7. Edgar Barth
9. Wolfgang Seidel

#8 seldo

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 14:05

Last Sunday, five German drivers finished the British Grand Prix at Silverstone in the top-ten:

3rd Nico Rosberg
7th Sebastian Vettel
8th Adrian Sutil
9th Michael Schumacher
10th Nico Hulkenberg

Think this is the first time in Formula 1 history, correct?
Five drivers (or more) of the same country, probably yes, but five Germans?

Whoopi-do...So you'd be Irish I guess...;)

#9 D-Type

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 14:12

Whoopi-do...So you'd be Irish I guess...;)

:confused:

#10 Tim Murray

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 14:48

Whoopi-do...So you'd be Irish I guess...;)

:confused: x2

#11 Vitesse2

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 15:16

I think you'd have to go back to the pre-F1 era to find anything similar in a Grand Prix

Restricting it to European Championship events I think the best performances by German drivers are seven (in the first eight!) in Switzerland in 1939, six in Germany in 1935 and five and four-fifths in Switzerland again in 1937.

#12 seccotine

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 20:50

There was a time when "German formula 1 driver" was an absurd concept.
Remember Rikki von Opel?

#13 D-Type

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 21:12

There was a time when "German formula 1 driver" was an absurd concept.
Remember Rikki von Opel?

From Liechtenstein, I think, not Germany.

#14 arttidesco

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 21:25

However 'absurd' even the great wisdom Wiki has Rikki von Opel, driver of the fabulous Ensign N173 as being a Lichtenstinian :rotfl:

Edited by arttidesco, 14 July 2010 - 21:25.


#15 Bauble

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 17:18

1954 British Grand Prix.
1st Gonzalez
3rd. Marimon
4th Fangio
6th. Mieres

Four in the top six is not bad for Argentina.

1958 World Championship
1st Hawthorn
2nd Moss
3rd.Brooks
4th Salvadori
5th. Collins & Schell

In 1963 British drivers won all rounds of the F1 World Championship Clark/Hill/Surtees.

I could go on.

Edited by Bauble, 15 July 2010 - 17:20.


#16 john winfield

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 07:46

I know there are many contributors who hate it when a thread goes off-topic so here goes. At the British GP in 1990, of the twenty six drivers on the grid, twelve, I think, were Italian and not one finished in the points. (I thought 12/26 was impressive enough, but to have nobody in the top six.....dio mio!) Maybe this isn't a record but I found it interesting. I'm easily pleased.

#17 HistoryFan

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 13:27

Very interesting topic!

In 20 years perhaps we can add five Indians, Russians and what ever...

#18 kayemod

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 14:29

Very interesting topic!

In 20 years perhaps we can add five Indians, Russians and what ever...


Or even, to quote the title of the 1939 Agatha Christie work, Ten Little N...... , subsequently renamed for our PC world as And Then There Were None.


#19 Rob

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 17:57

However 'absurd' even the great wisdom Wiki has Rikki von Opel, driver of the fabulous Ensign N173 as being a Lichtenstinian :rotfl:


Are you suggesting that he wasn't?

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#20 D-Type

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 18:01

Or even, to quote the title of the 1939 Agatha Christie work, Ten Little N...... , subsequently renamed for our PC world as And Then There Were None.

having gone through a stage as Ten little redskins until that was also ruled non-PC

#21 Ray Bell

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 19:05

Five British drivers in ten at Aintree in 1962:

1. Clark
2. Surtees
4. G. Hill
8. T. Taylor
10. Jack Lewis

That's ignoring McLaren in third and Brabham in fifth, they often being 'claimed' by the Poms as their own. This one might be more surprising:

US GP, 1962, US drivers:

5. Gurney
6. Gregory
9. Penske
10. Schroeder

Back with British drivers, 1964 British:

1. Clark
2. G. Hill
3. Surtees
7. Bob Anderson
9. Mike Spence
10. Innes Ireland

That's six, of course. Five British drivers on Italian soil is different (1965):

1. Stewart
2. G. Hill
6. Richard Attwood
9. Innes Ireland
10. Clark

The 1965 South African GP gave five British drivers in the first six:

1. Clark
2. Surtees
3. G. Hill
4. Spence
6. Stewart

Five out of seven at Monaco, 1964:

1. G. Hill
3. Peter Arundell
4. Clark
6. Hailwood
7. Anderson

Another five out of seven for British, Italy 1958:

1. Brooks
2. Hawthorn
3. Salvadori
6. G. Hill
7. Allison

Five Poms out of six at Zandvoort in 1964:

1. Clark
2. Surtees
3. Arundell
4. G. Hill
6. Anderson

Six out of nine finishers in France in 1965:

1. Clark
2. Stewart
3. Surtees
5. G. Hill
7. Spence
9. Anderson

And in Germany up against the might of the dominant Ferraris in 1961:

1. Moss
4. Clark
5. Surtees
9. Jack Lewis
10. Salvadori

The British drivers certainly got in the numbers in that period.



#22 kayemod

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 19:15

Good research Ray, really 'nerdy', but interesting to me, and I don't doubt many others, one of the aspects of TNF that I really like.

#23 HistoryFan

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 15:18

six in Germany in 1935


I think it were seven:
2. Hans Stuck (Auto Union)
3. Rudolf Caracciola (Mercedes Benz)
4. Bernd Rosemeyer (Auto Union)
5. Manfred von Brauchitsch (Mercedes Benz)
7. Hans Geier (Mercedes Benz)
9. Paul Pietsch (Auto Union)
10. Hans Rüesch (Maserati; Rüesch)


#24 D-Type

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 16:35

I think it were seven:
2. Hans Stuck (Auto Union)
3. Rudolf Caracciola (Mercedes Benz)
4. Bernd Rosemeyer (Auto Union)
5. Manfred von Brauchitsch (Mercedes Benz)
7. Hans Geier (Mercedes Benz)
9. Paul Pietsch (Auto Union)
10. Hans Rüesch (Maserati; Rüesch)

I think Hans Ruesch was Swiss

#25 kayemod

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 16:58

I think Hans Ruesch was Swiss


True, but a slightly tricky one, as he was born to Swiss parents in Naples, where he spent his childhood. Is this the same Hans Ruesch who was quite well-known after WW2 as a writer?


#26 Vitesse2

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 16:59

I think Hans Ruesch was Swiss

Jawohl! ;)

#27 Vitesse2

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 17:00

True, but a slightly tricky one, as he was born to Swiss parents in Naples, where he spent his childhood. Is this the same Hans Ruesch who was quite well-known after WW2 as a writer?

Nochmals jawohl! :lol:

#28 kayemod

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 17:07

Nochmals jawohl! :lol:


Or "Si!" as Hans' Mum would have said, she was Italo-Swiss and only spoke Italian, as Hans probably did, at least for the first part of his life, he didn't leave Italy until his late teens.

#29 HistoryFan

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 08:41

Oh, tschuldigung  ;)