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Red & blue Aeroquip fittings history


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#1 Kurtis 500S

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 17:17

When were the now ubiquitous red and blue anodized aluminum Aeroquip (Earls, etc) fittings introduced? We see these on all sorts of vintage race cars but there is some point in time when they are not correct to be used in a restoration.





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#2 arttidesco

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 18:09

I seem to remember Aeroquip adds as far back as my early interest in racing and reading Autosport in 1973, no mention of racing but here is the aeroquip company history which would suggest anything pre WW2 fitted with Aeroquip products is non original.

#3 David Birchall

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 18:16

I think most racers became really aware of Aeroquip after Carroll Smith's book "Prepare to Win" was published in 1975. I think it is fair to say that it was not in use on race cars other than F1 prior to 1970.

#4 T54

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 19:54

David,
you may have forgotten about the cars on which they were first used, Indy cars. A 1968 Eagle already had such fittings and I bet I can find pictures of period front-engine Offy's with such fittings...  ;)
Of course I am not sure of the exact year in which the aluminum fittings were anodized in red and blue, but I am sure that it was before 1970. :)


#5 jm70

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 20:09

For the longest time we called them AN fittings. ArmyNavy. Earls Supply in California was a big supplier for some time. I believe the start of their business was selling surplus hose, fittings, seat belts, etc after the war. A short search just now shows it being a division of Holley Industries.

#6 David Birchall

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 20:48

David,
you may have forgotten about the cars on which they were first used, Indy cars. A 1968 Eagle already had such fittings and I bet I can find pictures of period front-engine Offy's with such fittings... ;)
Of course I am not sure of the exact year in which the aluminum fittings were anodized in red and blue, but I am sure that it was before 1970. :)



Yes, I had forgotten Indy cars :blush:
More likely than F1 to have used the US parts.

#7 Bumblyari

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 21:19

Aeroquip-Vickers became part of the Eaton Corporation in 1999 and their performance product range (as they refer to their motor sport products) dates back to around 1950 I think.



#8 Formula Once

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 21:38

A McLaren-man told me they got to know Aeroquip in the CanAm-days and would ship a container full of it to Europe after the CanAm-season ended.

#9 RCH

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 22:14

I believe Aeroquip type hoses were a wartime development for aircraft. I'm sure they were in use in Europe by the late '60's but presumably much earlier in the US. The company I worked for from 1974 imported a range of US made fluid control equipment which included similar types of hoses but, despite my best efforts to divert them into motor sport, these were purely for industrial use.

#10 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 23:12

Industry, agriculture and earthmoving equipment have used that style of fitting since before the war. I suspect that aircraft may have used steel fittings and steel braid reinforced hose in that period too. Steel hydraulic fittings and hoses are considerably stronger and take far more pressure but work in the same manner as alloy. The alloy ones have been used since at least the 70s widely for oil and brake lines but for fuel largely later and for radiator hoses etc the last 15 years.
I am still very wary of it as I have seen too many hoses leak and fittings break.
For brakes I have never had a trouble but have seen more than the occasional oil line weeping and cracked alloy fitting.
A lot of this stuff is used because it looks pretty and no other reson. I will stick to my hydraulic fittings and hose which generally flow better and are nigh on bulletproof and a lot cheaper though ofcourse heavier.

#11 antonvrs

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 01:11

Fiat used Stainless web covered oil lines to and from the oil cooler on their 2-litre V8s(ottovu) in 1952. They had red and blue anodized aluminium fittings on the ends, too.
Anton

#12 Frank S

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 02:02

In May, 1960, the oil line between the block and gauge on my MGTD ruptured in the middle of the New Mexico desert. I don't actually recall if it had a woven-steel fabric covering, but when I reached Las Vegas* the MG dealer offered as replacement possibilities an Aeroquip-style hose and one with a spiral shield of metal, both with brass fittings.

* While my companion hitched the several miles back to the last gasoline station, for some replacement oil, I fabricated a plug out of a tack, a piece of soft plastic, and a fitting from the failed hose.

Edited by Frank S, 22 July 2010 - 02:03.


#13 horizon

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 04:24

In 1967,
The McLaren M5A ...Mclarens first 3 litre f1 car was plumbed in red/blue fittings! A story I heard, was that 2 McLaren employees ( A. Caldwell) spl? were sent to southren cailf.to roam the aircraft surplus stores & load a container with fittings/bolts/hose/switches/bearings at the end of 1966.


#14 doc knutsen

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 10:16

In 1967,
The McLaren M5A ...Mclarens first 3 litre f1 car was plumbed in red/blue fittings! A story I heard, was that 2 McLaren employees ( A. Caldwell) spl? were sent to southren cailf.to roam the aircraft surplus stores & load a container with fittings/bolts/hose/switches/bearings at the end of 1966.


Aeroquip and similar fittings were well known on the West Coast of the USA by the late Fifties, probably due to a lot of the people involved being ex-Air Force and thus used to working with proper fluid transfer fittings. Unless I am Murray Walkering, the Scarabs had Aeroquip fittings in 1958.


#15 beighes

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 00:16

So, here's my 2p. Whether accurate or not, follow this link for a bit of information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN_thread

Back in my days of peddling race spares (Earl's & Aeroquip), both manufacturers stressed not to use the alloy fittings & the standard hose for brake/clutch hydraulics. That's what the -3/-4 steel braid covered teflon lines & stainless fittings were for. I would not sell an alloy AN to brake caliper adapter fitting to a customer. I had seen too many fail.

#16 Andrew Fellowes

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 04:56

The CAMS chart in relation to all equipment on historic cars in Australia is a useful guide;

Coloured anodised fittings are allowed post 1969 http://www.camsmanua...ipment_Q310.pdf

Edited by Andrew Fellowes, 23 July 2010 - 04:58.


#17 doc knutsen

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 09:33

Had a quick look in Preston Lerner's excellent book on the Scarabs, and the pictures of the F1 Scarab being built in 1959 show the use of Aeroquip fluid lines throughout the car.