Jump to content


Photo

Modelling techniques


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,047 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 14 August 2010 - 19:44

The title is self explanatory. I often come across things I'd like to know how to do or do better and I think that someone here may know. Please add your questions and tips.

One that I've come across is "chromed" parts. They often appear too shiny. Does anybody know a way of dulling it down slightly?

Another is that radiators are "too silver". Is there an easy way to sort of paint them so that matt black sort of fills the hollows only?

Advertisement

#2 SWB

SWB
  • Member

  • 239 posts
  • Joined: October 07

Posted 14 August 2010 - 20:47

Do you have the booklet 'The World of 43rd' published by Marsh Models?

The World of 43rd

It covers many techniques of model building.

For your question about making radiators more realistic the best way is to use black artists oil paint. A small tube goes a long way. Thin a tiny squeeze of paint from the tube with white spirit or turpentine and with a soft brush flow it onto the radiator. It should find its own level and fill in the deeper areas to make it look 3D. Experiment with the consistency. If it doesn't work first time mop it up with a thinner dampened cloth and start again. White Spirit and turps will not damage any modern paint finish on diecast, although you should test it first. Artists oils also take a while to dry, sometimes a few days, so there is plenty of time to play. Also use artists oils for filling in panel lines. Choose a colour to compliment the main colour, so for a red car choose dark brown (not black), and run this into the gap. Any that goes over onto the panel wipe off with your finger (a cloth is to absorbent and will drag the paint out and you will need to start again). After a few days for drying wipe over gently with a polishing cloth and the panel line should look crisp and well defined.

Steve

Edited by SWB, 14 August 2010 - 20:47.


#3 biercemountain

biercemountain
  • Member

  • 964 posts
  • Joined: June 01

Posted 24 August 2010 - 17:02

Another is that radiators are "too silver". Is there an easy way to sort of paint them so that matt black sort of fills the hollows only?


An oil paint wash works well for this effect. Mix together a small amount of burnt umber and black oil paint, add a bit of thinner and then a drop of dishwashing liquid (the soap helps the wash hold onto the painted parts).

Apply the wash over the area making sure all the recessed areas are filled. Using a clean cloth gently wipe the wash from the surface leaving only the recessed areas darkened. Try to wipe perpendicular to the direction of the recessed areas to prevent wiping the wash out of grooves.

You might want to experiment on parts from a spares box to get comfortable with the technique (and the proper paint formula). It's scary at first because it seems you're just making a mess but as you start wiping the part down you'll be surprised by the results.

You will want to let the part dry for a good long time as oil paint takes a while to fully cure.


#4 Hamish Robson

Hamish Robson
  • Member

  • 347 posts
  • Joined: May 09

Posted 25 August 2010 - 09:46

One that I've come across is "chromed" parts. They often appear too shiny. Does anybody know a way of dulling it down slightly?

Another is that radiators are "too silver". Is there an easy way to sort of paint them so that matt black sort of fills the hollows only?


To make radiators look "deeper" I give them a wash with Tamiya "Smoke" (X-19 I think) which is a clear grey colour, it settles in to the radiator core pattern nicely.

Overly shiney chrome parts may be stripped with bleach (always use a well-ventilated area and cover your skin!), then painted with the silver/chrome paint of your choice, such as Alclad.


A great forum to have a look is the F1M Forum - http://www.f1m.com/m...forum/index.php - a very helpful and knowledgable group of modellers.

Edited by Hamish Robson, 25 August 2010 - 09:47.