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1:43-scale Moss cars


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#101 robjohn

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 04:42

Malcolm: Does the photo in Lugvisen's book show whether the 1953 works C-types at Dundrod had bonnet straps? The Haynes Moss model has them but they're not visible in low-res photos I have of the Moss and Rolt cars. Straps were fitted at Le Mans but perhaps the TT regs didn't require them when the bonnet was front-hinged. Omitting them would save time in pit-stops.
The works cars didn't carry "number plates" in the 1953 TT, so I've been able to strike those off my list. Vince's info seems to confirm the Moss car was XKC 053, though the register is wrong in saying it retired.
What were the road numbers used at Le Mans, such as 774RM (or is it W)? Were they French?
Robin / robjohn

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#102 D-Type

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 10:43

774RW etc in red on a white background were [British] trade plates belonging to Jaguar, ie temporary plates that allowed an unregistered car to be driven on the road. They normally come with straps for temporary fixing but in saloon cars the delivery drivers sometimes simply put them on the dashboard and parcel shelf.

I have seen photos of C-types with the proper trade plates temporarily fixed to the front or back of the car. I have also seen pictures with the numbers painted on. It appears that latterly Jaguar adopted the approach of painting the trade plate numbers on the front and back. I don't know why - maybe they lost one somewhere, maybe they had difficulty finding anywhere on a sports racer to fix them to. Presumably on the roadjourney they carried the plates in the cockpit.

these explain why the same 714 RW number appears on the 1955 Le Mans D-Type as earlier on the C-Types.

Edited by D-Type, 12 April 2011 - 10:44.


#103 robjohn

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 11:00

774RW etc in red on a white background were [British] trade plates belonging to Jaguar, ie temporary plates that allowed an unregistered car to be driven on the road. They normally come with straps for temporary fixing but in saloon cars the delivery drivers sometimes simply put them on the dashboard and parcel shelf.
I have seen photos of C-types with the proper trade plates temporarily fixed to the front or back of the car. I have also seen pictures with the numbers painted on. It appears that latterly Jaguar adopted the approach of painting the trade plate numbers on the front and back. I don't know why - maybe they lost one somewhere, maybe they had difficulty finding anywhere on a sports racer to fix them to. Presumably on the roadjourney they carried the plates in the cockpit.
these explain why the same 714 RW number appears on the 1955 Le Mans D-Type as earlier on the C-Types.

Thanks, D-type. I should have thought of that. Similar to Italian PROVA numbers, I suppose.
robjohn



#104 Mal9444

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 18:45

Can any Maserati expert assist with pictures of Moss in a 1957 lightweight 250F – and/ or advise if this 1957 250F could easily be turned into a Moss car?

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I bought it on eBay for an incredible £3.99 + £2.50 postage. It really is a beautiful little model: there are some more at similar prices and I commend them to you. This is Fangio’s Nurburgring car, of which there are many versions in both 1:43 and 1:18. I already have one of the latter.

The Haynes collection has this, being Moss’s 1957 Argentine GP car in Buenos Aires.

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According to My Cars My Career Moss set fastest lap in practice but at the start suffered a broken throttle linkage which took nine laps to repair. He eventually finished 8th. In the Formula Libre race Moss led for a while but eventually had to stop, overcome by heat and by locking brakes.

My Cars… has a picture of Moss in a 1956 lightweight 250F, race number 36, at the Italian GP at Monza. This was the race in which he ran out of fuel and was pushed into the pits by a fellow Maserati driver, topped up and went on to win. If the model is reasonably representative of his 1956 Monza 250F it would be simple to do away with the yellow nose band and change the numbers.


And while speaking of eBay (UK) – there is suddenly a plethora of the 1958 Italian GP-winning Vanwall.

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By changing the 26 to a 2 we then have the ’58 Portugese GP-winning Vanwall.

The ugly extra air intake on the nose is easily removable and by turning the yellow nose flash into a yellow nose band we have the 1957 Pescara-winning Vanwall.

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I might also change the numbers and the colour of the nose band to white to create his own number 18 British GP car: nearly all models I have seen, including the Brumm model I have, omit the white nose band. Then, and – if I am brave enough - I could convert the inaccurate Brumm into the short-nose 1958 Monaco car. Unless anyone has a better idea, of course…


#105 paulhooft

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 19:16

That makes it a VANMOSS?



Can any Maserati expert assist with pictures of Moss in a 1957 lightweight 250F – and/ or advise if this 1957 250F could easily be turned into a Moss car?

Posted Image

I bought it on eBay for an incredible £3.99 + £2.50 postage. It really is a beautiful little model: there are some more at similar prices and I commend them to you. This is Fangio’s Nurburgring car, of which there are many versions in both 1:43 and 1:18. I already have one of the latter.

The Haynes collection has this, being Moss’s 1957 Argentine GP car in Buenos Aires.

Posted Image

According to My Cars My Career Moss set fastest lap in practice but at the start suffered a broken throttle linkage which took nine laps to repair. He eventually finished 8th. In the Formula Libre race Moss led for a while but eventually had to stop, overcome by heat and by locking brakes.

My Cars… has a picture of Moss in a 1956 lightweight 250F, race number 36, at the Italian GP at Monza. This was the race in which he ran out of fuel and was pushed into the pits by a fellow Maserati driver, topped up and went on to win. If the model is reasonably representative of his 1956 Monza 250F it would be simple to do away with the yellow nose band and change the numbers.


And while speaking of eBay (UK) – there is suddenly a plethora of the 1958 Italian GP-winning Vanwall.

Posted Image

By changing the 26 to a 2 we then have the ’58 Portugese GP-winning Vanwall.

The ugly extra air intake on the nose is easily removable and by turning the yellow nose flash into a yellow nose band we have the 1957 Pescara-winning Vanwall.

Posted Image

I might also change the numbers and the colour of the nose band to white to create his own number 18 British GP car: nearly all models I have seen, including the Brumm model I have, omit the white nose band. Then, and – if I am brave enough - I could convert the inaccurate Brumm into the short-nose 1958 Monaco car. Unless anyone has a better idea, of course…



#106 David McKinney

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 20:01

Moss drove a 250F in only two 1957 races, the Argentine and Buenos Aires. In both cases it was a 1957 lightweight type, virtually identical to the Fangio Nürburgring car. Moss's race number on both occasions was 4, and the car was c/no 2527

The car he drove at Monza in 1956 was a different model, with offset drive-train and lower seating position

#107 Mal9444

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 20:29

Moss drove a 250F in only two 1957 races, the Argentine and Buenos Aires. In both cases it was a 1957 lightweight type, virtually identical to the Fangio Nürburgring car. Moss's race number on both occasions was 4, and the car was c/no 2527

The car he drove at Monza in 1956 was a different model, with offset drive-train and lower seating position


Thank you, David.

(I have, of course, already looked in your book - but it is good to have your blessing :wave: on the probable accuracy of any changes I make. I had thought that the pictureof 2527 on p159 thereof might be of Moss (white helmet, typical spare goggles) but as that car has race number 6, it must not be he.)


#108 Barry Boor

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 20:46

Harry Schell, I think, Malcolm.

#109 Mal9444

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 06:27

Harry Schell, I think, Malcolm.


Seems to be the general view, Barry.

Just lining-up projects for my retirement...

:wave:

Incidentally...

is the Haynes model correct in showing Moss's Buenos Aires car with a blue nose band.?
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In My Cars DCN quotes Moss as saying 'Maserati made me an offer... to team up again with Fangio and Behra. Maserati fielded three new lightweight 250Fs for us and I...' One would have thought that the nose bands would have been yellow for Fangio, blue for Behra and green for Moss. Moss describes the race and mentions Castelotti (Ferrari) and Fangio but not Behra. Did Moss in fact drive Behra's car?

Is the Haynes model Moss's car at all, given that David says that Moss drove race no 4 and the Haynes has race no 6.



#110 Mal9444

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 06:44

I really should do my own research instead of asking TNF...

This report (http://www.grandprix.../gpe/rr057.html) of the race shows that Behra was very much there. Given that the report and david both state Moss to have been driving car number 4, the Haynes model muust indeed be Behra's car.

I wonder why.

#111 Barry Boor

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 07:24

Perhaps they thought that there are more than enough Moss cars around already.  ;)

#112 Mal9444

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 08:36

... more than enough Moss cars around already.  ;)


Not possible, Old Boy...


#113 Mal9444

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 11:31

Here we are then...

Anyone else got one of these?


Posted Image

Thanks to all.


#114 Tony Lethbridge

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 13:25

No, but you're giving me ideas. Very nice model.


Here we are then...

Anyone else got one of these?


Posted Image

Thanks to all.



#115 Mal9444

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 07:29

Has anyone any personal knowledge of a Corgi Mk2 Jag, #42, purportedly SCM?

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item2c5ae9aa8d

Is it just another Corgi toy car (no harm to Corgi, you understand, but I was always a Dinky boy myself) or is it worth putting in a Moss collection that strives for a measure of accuracy?

Thanks.

BTW: current works in progress: a bit of touching up to do, but Silverstone '58 and Casablanca '58, re-paints from the cheap Portugese GP models currently on eBay. (Is someone else buying these: the prices are going up?)

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Tony: modding the old and faded Brumm no18 failed completely: it fell to bits completely when I started work on it, having dismantled it first. I got as far as filing off the nose as far as the radiator and repainting (albeit the front of the car is really the wrong shape: too oval) but when I began to put it back together both back wheels simply broke up, the plastic wheel spokes have gone completely brittle. The bits are in the bin!

#116 Tony Lethbridge

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 20:14


Tony: modding the old and faded Brumm no18 failed completely: it fell to bits completely when I started work on it, having dismantled it first. I got as far as filing off the nose as far as the radiator and repainting (albeit the front of the car is really the wrong shape: too oval) but when I began to put it back together both back wheels simply broke up, the plastic wheel spokes have gone completely brittle. The bits are in the bin!

That is a shame, Malcolm. I have had one of these wheels break up too. That was on an old Ferrari but I think Brumm used the same wheels on several models at the time. I have chopped a '375' into Harry Schell's Monza Race of Two Worlds mount, and had no problem with the cutting. A friend bought a Monaco short nose Vanwall kit ( can't remember the manufacturer) and then found it was the standard kit with instructions telling him to saw the nose off! I'll try and find one down here rather than push the ebay prices up and have a go at one.

#117 RCH

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 19:31

Has anyone any personal knowledge of a Corgi Mk2 Jag, #42, purportedly SCM?

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item2c5ae9aa8d

Is it just another Corgi toy car (no harm to Corgi, you understand, but I was always a Dinky boy myself) or is it worth putting in a Moss collection that strives for a measure of accuracy?

Thanks.


The Corgi Mk. II wasn't too bad as Mk.II's went but as you say it's a toy. Price seems a bit high but I guess that's supply and demand! I reckon that the Mk. II was not that easy to get looking right on all the 1/43 scale models I've seen the side windows seem either too deep or too shallow. My old friends at Milestone Miniatures (aka Gems & Cobwebs) did a passable one based I think on PM kit, the only "competition" version was the Lumsden/Sargent/?/? Monza record car. I think the PM kits were Tour de France cars. Vitesse did the T de F cars as well, perhaps the best one to look for a donor for a Moss conversion.

#118 Mal9444

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 21:04

The Corgi Mk. II wasn't too bad as Mk.II's went but as you say it's a toy. Price seems a bit high but I guess that's supply and demand! I reckon that the Mk. II was not that easy to get looking right on all the 1/43 scale models I've seen the side windows seem either too deep or too shallow. My old friends at Milestone Miniatures (aka Gems & Cobwebs) did a passable one based I think on PM kit, the only "competition" version was the Lumsden/Sargent/?/? Monza record car. I think the PM kits were Tour de France cars. Vitesse did the T de F cars as well, perhaps the best one to look for a donor for a Moss conversion.


Thanks. I'll give it a miss, I think.

Been on a bit of a Vanwall/ Maserati/ Lotus buying spree. 'Er indoors will be getting suspicious.


#119 D-Type

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:06

Thanks. I'll give it a miss, I think.

Been on a bit of a Vanwall/ Maserati/ Lotus buying spree. 'Er indoors will be getting suspicious.

The Brumm Vanwall is, shall we say, not the best model they made. Unfortunately nobody has produced an affordable 1:43 model or even a [recent] unaffordable one.
It is actually a 1956/57 car - or at least the exhaust is as the 1958 one was different.

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#120 Mal9444

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 18:22

The Brumm Vanwall is... actually a 1956/57 car - or at least the exhaust is as the 1958 one was different.


Hence the wire-spoked rear wheels. Which is why I should have turned it into the '57 Pescara car. Grrr. :(


#121 D-Type

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 11:24

Brumm took their basic Vanwall, changed the numbers and added a few obvious bits like the bonnet scoop and the different wheels and sold them as varients for different races. Fair enough, but the basic model was so poor.

#122 Kitkent

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 17:29

[quote name='Mal9444' date='Apr 25 2011, 21:04' post='4988979']
Thanks. I'll give it a miss, I think.

Been on a bit of a Vanwall/ Maserati/ Lotus buying spree. 'Er indoors will be getting suspicious.


The best ready made 1/43 Jaguar MK2 is the Minichamps one if you can get one,the shape really is spot on.

#123 Mal9444

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 18:53

The best ready made 1/43 Jaguar MK2 is the Minichamps one if you can get one,the shape really is spot on.

:up: :wave:

#124 RCH

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 13:14

http://shop.modelgarage.co.uk/

Some unusual Moss related models here, click on Historic Sports Racers. Will remove if this is seen as advertising.
Rod

#125 Mal9444

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 13:25

http://shop.modelgarage.co.uk/

Some unusual Moss related models here, click on Historic Sports Racers. Will remove if this is seen as advertising.
Rod


Nice models. Just have the decimal point one place too far to the right for my display case.

Edited by Mal9444, 16 May 2011 - 13:26.


#126 RCH

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 13:53

Nice models. Just have the decimal point one place too far to the right for my display case.

Thought you may say that! Just wish I could get 'em cheaper.

#127 Mal9444

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 12:54

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A marvellous addition to my modest collection provided by Barry B, to whom of course very many thanks. BB will be able, should he have a mind, to tell us of exactly how he modified the original Corgi toy but the finished article is, as we would all expect, quite stunning: the BRP paint scheme exquisitely executed, the detailing lovely and the whole thing a joy to own not least because I suspect there to be only two in the world – Barry’s own and now mine.

I took a look on Google to check out the Corgi original and was staggered to discover this: http://www.ebay.co.u...?_nkw=corgi brm.

Already wondering how I can re-pay Barry for his time and kindness I now don’t quite know what to say!

The car is Moss’ BRM P25 painted in BRP pale green and numbered for his 1959 British GP entry. He was second, after a terrific dice with Bruce McLaren in a Cooper. This is the car that a few weeks later was totally destroyed at the Berlin GP in a spectacular crash of which there is a well-known and spectacular photograph of the car upside-down in mid-air while the erstwhile pilot Hans Herrmann crouches down on the track below it, having already been flung-out.

I’d been away from home on business when Barry’s package arrived for me so had only just got home and opened it when by the oddest of odd co-incidences I flicked on Motors TV to see what was on. A programme called rear View Mirror ‘featuring racing of the Fifties and Sixties’. I clicked on the select button and across my TV screen came the very car, coming into the pits for a tire change. Remarkable.

Warm thanks to Barry B. That brings my little 1/43rd-scale collection of Moss cars up to 28. Only another 450 or so to go!

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#128 Barry Boor

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 13:43

Malcolm, your praise is unwarranted!

It's only a Corgi toy after all - with some better wheels and a bit of Toyota paint.

#129 Mal9444

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 23:32

Collectors of models of Moss cars may be interested in this question, http://forums.autosp...howtopic=158017. posted on the hisrorical research sub-forum although the model in question is not 1/43rd scale.

Hands up all those who have this car, in whatever scale, with white number roundels.

And hands up all those who wiould pay this sort of money for a model, of whatever scale.

Edited by Mal9444, 28 November 2011 - 23:33.


#130 Mal9444

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 09:05

This thread in the main forum may be of interest: http://forums.autosp...p;#entry5645028

Despite my aspirations to collect all of the GMH's cars I don't think I'll be adding this one, for the reasons mentioned on the other thread.

This is the model i n question.

Edited by Mal9444, 06 April 2012 - 09:09.


#131 SueL

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:57

I have read this topic with interest and registered on this forum in order to put the record straight – or at least as straight as my memory will allow. Stuart Leake was my husband, and I put the collection up for sale as he wished. Having spent approx 18 years researching and collecting he wanted the collection of around 170 models, to remain as a collection and go to someone who would appreciate it. When Oliver Strebel-Ritter phoned me to say a motor museum wanted to buy it and put it on display I was overjoyed as Stuart loved to show the models and a museum was the ultimate show.

Stuart did not build models but the collection includes a very large number of conversions and handbuilts. Some are unique as they are scratchbuilds (the Harford is one of those). The conversions and builds were mostly the work of several fine model makers; Brian Bowden, Chris Derbyshire, Rodney Fox, and Tony Smith (who did all the scratchbuilds). Someone mentioned the Dundrod car with the damage which featured in the Octane magazine and was my favourite model in the collection. This model has a story of its own.

It is a standard Brumm diecast which Stuart handed over to Chris Derbyshire for customising. He also gave him several photographs of the car to ensure the decals were correct. Chris, knowing Stu liked things to be absolutely right, had a word with a mutual friend and asked if Stu really wanted the model to truly represent the car in the photos. The answer was “Go for it” so Chris put the model to an angle grinder (without telling Stu) and perfectly replicated the damage to the back wing. And “perfect” is the word. He even inserted the spare wheel in the boot and which is just visible through the hole in the bodywork. Stu was handed the model with the undamaged side facing him but when he turned it round he was astounded. To say he was pleased would be an understatement of huge proportions

SMTS have since brought out a set of vehicles damaged during races and includes the Dundrod. Both the Chris D model and the SMTS one have been compared side by side and everyone present agreed that the converted Brumm is far better especially as the edges of the damage are bright metal whereas the SMTS one is painted! Honestly – a car damaged during a race is unlikely to get a respray in the pits!

I said he liked things to be absolutely right and he did. He spent hours (years rather) meticulously researching the individual cars and the same car often had modifications for different races (apart from the decals that is). When Stirling Moss told him that the 722 car had a 3-spoke steering wheel and not a 4-spoke one he promptly had it changed! Doug Nye had no connection with the collection although his book was one of the many reference points. It was Stu’s own painstaking work.

It is worth saying that the “scrapbook” which Stu compiled and was in 6 or 7 lever arch files is also in the possession of the Haynes museum along with a CD containing the database which I maintained of the collection. I am sure if you are really interested the curator would give you access.

Finally the collection was NOT complete but as complete as he could make it. It covered the professional career of Sir Stirling Moss and the title on the Haynes display is what Stuart himself used “Stirling Moss; His Cars – His Career”. Incidentally the Haynes Museum has kept the models on Stu’s original bases along with his labels and I for one could not be better pleased. A truly wonderful memorial.


#132 Barry Boor

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 06:54

Thank you for posting this excellent information, Sue. :)



#133 Mal9444

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 07:39

I have read this topic with interest and registered on this forum in order to put the record straight – or at least as straight as my memory will allow. Stuart Leake was my husband, and I put the collection up for sale as he wished. Having spent approx 18 years researching and collecting he wanted the collection of around 170 models, to remain as a collection and go to someone who would appreciate it. When Oliver Strebel-Ritter phoned me to say a motor museum wanted to buy it and put it on display I was overjoyed as Stuart loved to show the models and a museum was the ultimate show.

Stuart did not build models but the collection includes a very large number of conversions and handbuilts. Some are unique as they are scratchbuilds (the Harford is one of those). The conversions and builds were mostly the work of several fine model makers; Brian Bowden, Chris Derbyshire, Rodney Fox, and Tony Smith (who did all the scratchbuilds). Someone mentioned the Dundrod car with the damage which featured in the Octane magazine and was my favourite model in the collection. This model has a story of its own.

It is a standard Brumm diecast which Stuart handed over to Chris Derbyshire for customising. He also gave him several photographs of the car to ensure the decals were correct. Chris, knowing Stu liked things to be absolutely right, had a word with a mutual friend and asked if Stu really wanted the model to truly represent the car in the photos. The answer was “Go for it” so Chris put the model to an angle grinder (without telling Stu) and perfectly replicated the damage to the back wing. And “perfect” is the word. He even inserted the spare wheel in the boot and which is just visible through the hole in the bodywork. Stu was handed the model with the undamaged side facing him but when he turned it round he was astounded. To say he was pleased would be an understatement of huge proportions

SMTS have since brought out a set of vehicles damaged during races and includes the Dundrod. Both the Chris D model and the SMTS one have been compared side by side and everyone present agreed that the converted Brumm is far better especially as the edges of the damage are bright metal whereas the SMTS one is painted! Honestly – a car damaged during a race is unlikely to get a respray in the pits!

I said he liked things to be absolutely right and he did. He spent hours (years rather) meticulously researching the individual cars and the same car often had modifications for different races (apart from the decals that is). When Stirling Moss told him that the 722 car had a 3-spoke steering wheel and not a 4-spoke one he promptly had it changed! Doug Nye had no connection with the collection although his book was one of the many reference points. It was Stu’s own painstaking work.

It is worth saying that the “scrapbook” which Stu compiled and was in 6 or 7 lever arch files is also in the possession of the Haynes museum along with a CD containing the database which I maintained of the collection. I am sure if you are really interested the curator would give you access.

Finally the collection was NOT complete but as complete as he could make it. It covered the professional career of Sir Stirling Moss and the title on the Haynes display is what Stuart himself used “Stirling Moss; His Cars – His Career”. Incidentally the Haynes Museum has kept the models on Stu’s original bases along with his labels and I for one could not be better pleased. A truly wonderful memorial.


SueL - what a wonderful post, and welcome. Thank you for this record of how that wonderful collection came into being. As I said in my post (#70) after I had gone to the Haynes Museum specifically to see the collection, it is quite humbling and sets the bar for anyone who aspires to collect SM cars.

You mention the damaged Dundrod car. If you have a look at post #5 you will see that I too have one of those. At the time I thought there to be only two in the world: mine and Stirling's, both built by me from SMTS kits (complete with spare tyre showing and with unsprayed ragged edges!) and the latter given by me to SCM in the belief that he would not have such a model. Wrong on both counts!

You mention that SMTS ' have since brought out a set of vehicles damaged during races and includes the Dundrod'. I have seen a wood-base-mounted set of four Moss 300SLRs and these were 722, 19, 10 and 104 - Mille Miglie, Le Mans, Dundrod and Targa Florio. Each was, as you say, in race-end condition. I first came across them in an auction report on the Internet but by that tiome they had been sold. I later saw them in SCM's house, partly hidden behind a larger Vanwall in one of his many display cases, and assumed that it was he who had bought them at the auction. I also assumed them to be a one-off. Is this the set you mean - or are there others? It would be fun to have the set.

The Doug Nye connection is worth commenting on also. Having read My Car My Career I was surprised to see great chunks of the book displayed along with the models in the museum but without credit to Doug as their author. I corresponded with Doug on the subject and of course what I had not twigged was that while the copyright to the words is owned jointly by Stirling Moss and Doug Nye, the publishing rights were acquired by Haynes in 1999 when the book, originally published in 1987 by Patrick Stephens, was re-published by them to Mark SCM's 70th birthday. Doug was pretty relaxed about it all.

While I was simply poring, mouth agape, at your late husband's marvelous work my good lady, who is not the slightest interested in cars but is, mercifully, interested in me had the good sense to take a picture of every single one of them and these I now treasure as the archive reference point for any more Moss cars I want to 'create' from standard models.

You have every right to be pleased: the collection being displayed complete in a museum for the benefit of all of us does indeed make a fitting memorail - as well as an incomparable resource.

Added later: Stuart's modified Brum 300slr on display in the Haynes Museum
Posted Image[/IMG]

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Edited by Mal9444, 15 April 2012 - 08:03.


#134 SueL

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 08:03

......

You have every right to be pleased: the collection being displayed complete in a museum for the benefit of all of us does indeed make a fitting memorail - as well as an incomparable resource.


Malcolm, thank you for your very kind words which really give me a lift as I have been having a "bad hair" week! I am a lifelong fan of Stirling Moss and when my husband started on the collection I too became interested so it was really "our" collection although it was Stu's passion. It was a highlight when part of the collection was displayed at the very first historic motor show (now Race Retro) when Sir Stirling was guest of honour and came to our stand (South Hants Model Auto Club) and stayed for about an hour despite heroic attempts by his PA to get him to move on to his next appointment. Stu was almost in tears and I can say that after 50 years I got a hug from my hero! :rotfl:

I have discovered that I still have the database on my computer which includes a lot of information on both the models and the events including many that had no particular model associated with them. Pictures of most of the models are there as well. So if anyone has any questions I will endeavour to answer them.

Lastly I have to thank Chris Derbyshire who pointed me in the direction of this topic! Thanks Chris


#135 Mal9444

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 09:39

The latest addition to my growing but still modest collection, with grateful thanks to Tony Lethbridge.

Posted Image

I bought the model last year at the Revival for, IIRC, £4.00 (!). It was at that stage just a blue road-going car, but I thought I could do a repaint for the ’'60 or '61 TT car. When I studied it more closely I saw it was left-hand drive!

We then had all that TNF correspondence (see above and in Historical Research) about the colour of the number plates, so repainting went on the back burner, while conversion from left-hand to right-hand drive I knew would probably be beyond me anyway.

A chance remark when visiting Tony to see his fabulous Ferrari collection (precise number of models Classified in the interest of Marital Continuity ;) ) led to his offering to ‘have a go’ for me.

The camera grossly exaggerates the brush strokes in repainting white number roundels blue: these are simply not noticeable with the model sitting among others in my display cabinet. Tony has even installed the GMH in correct blue overalls with white helmet. Not to mention re-positioning the windscreen wipers.

Do I now have the only 1/43rd-scale of this car that has number plates of the correct, blue, colour as opposed to the inaccurate white so widely seen? (Even the one in the Haynes Museum in Stuart Leake's fabulous collection has white plates.)

Either way, thank you Tony.

Edited by Mal9444, 19 August 2012 - 10:08.


#136 Barry Boor

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 09:54

I assume the actual blue is a great deal darker than it looks in the photo. :)

#137 Mal9444

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 10:02

I assume the actual blue is a great deal darker than it looks in the photo. :)


You assume correctly, Barry. :wave:


#138 Mal9444

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:00

Posted Image

Found this on eBay reasonably priced. 1957 Swedish GR at Kristianstad. Moss actually started in sister car No 8 while Jean Behra started this car. Moss took this car over after Jean’s first pit stop, having already handed over No 8 to Harry Schell. Moss held the lead in this car until handing back to Behra for the final two hours. Moss then took over the leading 300s to work that up into a class lead, sharing the laurel in the 300s with Schell, Bonier and Scarlatti. So in the 1957 Swedish Grand Prix, run in sports cars, Moss was both first overall and first in class having driven three different cars shared between five different drivers. Short of having models of all three, I am content with this one even though Haynes/ Leake shows No 8 as the Moss car, with a much better detailed model than mine.

Posted Image

The tonneau is a moot point. I cannot find any photos that confirm or deny its existence, though I suppose it most likely would have been used, that being the fashion then. But what colour? Some of the other Haynes/ Leake tonneaus are wrong. Also, my car should have the two extra air intakes either side the grille, like the H/L car.

The collection thus far:

Posted Image



#139 Barry Boor

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:05

Take the doors off and take another photo, Malcolm.

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#140 Mal9444

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 13:02

Take the doors off and take another photo, Malcolm.


I'll try. But since my stroke I have - for the moment at least - only one properly working hand, which makes it tricky handling glass doors (not to mention good claret).


#141 nicanary

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 13:18

Wow, my favourite era with my favourite cars. The 50s sports-racers, the very apogee of endurance racing. Still recognisable as related to the road cars you could buy, very often finished in the makers/entrants national colours. Nostalgic bliss!

#142 D-Type

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 16:28

Malcolm, sorry to hear about the stroke. I'm sure you'll find an answer to the claret challenge: hold the corkscrew in your teeth, put the bottle on the floor and hold it with your feet, one of those gas-powered thingies (Corkmaster?), share the bottle with a friend who can open it.

As to the tonneau cover: My cars my career has an 'artistically blurred' shot of the 450S at the Nurburgring with a tonneau cover so the odds are it had one in Sweden.

#143 Mal9444

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 17:45

Malcolm, sorry to hear about the stroke. I'm sure you'll find an answer to the claret challenge: hold the corkscrew in your teeth, put the bottle on the floor and hold it with your feet, one of those gas-powered thingies (Corkmaster?), share the bottle with a friend who can open it.

As to the tonneau cover: My cars my career has an 'artistically blurred' shot of the 450S at the Nurburgring with a tonneau cover so the odds are it had one in Sweden.


Thank you Duncan. Check your PMs.

I shall get round to adding a tonneau one day.

As to the claret, I'm working on it already. :wave:


#144 Mal9444

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 17:54

Wow, my favourite era with my favourite cars. The 50s sports-racers, the very apogee of endurance racing. Still recognisable as related to the road cars you could buy, very often finished in the makers/entrants national colours. Nostalgic bliss!


I absolutely so agree. And with the added bonus that you could watch them driving to and from the circuit. That, of course, is why I (very modestly, and very slowly) collect tham. I buy only cars that connect: i. e. I saw them race [sometimes if only on - black-and-white - television]; or I know them some other way.


#145 Mal9444

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 18:28

Take the doors off and take another photo, Malcolm.


Sorry, Barry.
In my present shaky state this is the best I can do.

Posted Image


The colours look a bit odd.

For example, this is a better representation of the 'wishy-washy pale green' (to quote the GMH) 1950 Dundrod XK120

Posted Image


#146 Barry Boor

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 18:42

That's better, Malcolm, very nice.

#147 D-Type

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 12:06

I wonder: is the colour change simply the change from daylight to artificial light?

#148 SWB

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 12:20

Posted Image

I bought the model last year at the Revival for, IIRC, £4.00 (!). It was at that stage just a blue road-going car, but I thought I could do a repaint for the ’'60 or '61 TT car. When I studied it more closely I saw it was left-hand drive!


Well done on getting the right car for the right race! A lot of diescast renditions of the '60 car seem to be based on the '61 250SWB that has more squared off shape to the side windows. Yours has the correct droopy side windows for '60. Another thing wrong with many diecast renditions of the '61 TT car are that while the shape of the car is correct as a '61 250SWB, the backgrounds to the race numbers this time should be light green and not the blue so often used.

Steve

Edited by SWB, 22 August 2012 - 12:23.


#149 mouserat159

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 12:26

Mal9444, I have just came across your topic on the Autosport forums..
I live in Austraila and I just brought a 1:43 Stirling Moss T51 1959 MONTE CARLO POLE POSITION from Bainte Model Cars in Australia.
They also have :-
Cooper T51 - Italian GP Winner (1959)
Cooper T51 - Portuguese GP Winner (1959)
Portuguese GP Winner (1959)

All those models will be the same as the model as I bought (just with the different numbers & different title on the base. All of the above retail Price: $85.00 AUD. But probably cost more for irternational ordering, with shipping & handling. But the model are will worth the cost with very fine detail in the cockpit and you can remove the engine cover with all the spark plug leads. I am very fussy with my model collection & if I am happy with it it says alot for the quality of the model.

Bainte Model Cars also has Stirling Moss Lotus 19 made by Spark,

This link will take you straight to Bainte Model Cars Stirling Moss model page by using this link-:
http://www.biante.co...quicksearch.y=8

I hope this helps you.

Mouserat 159

#150 Barry Boor

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 12:58

I'm sure these Biante models are very nice but over here in Europe, Brumm are doing the same cars for around 25% of the price of the Australian ones.

Plus, I suspect Malcolm has the Coopers covered.