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Australian 6 Manufacturing plant


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#501 Magoo

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:19

Ah so it was Amelia Earhart - but what the hell is a Terrplane?

Constant indeed. :)


I'm so happy that you and Locock have finally found purpose in your lives.

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#502 Magoo

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:28

redundancy can also lead to re - invention

http://www.greenerid...ient-3-wheeler/


Yep, they're in the old Shreveport GM pickup truck plant. This facility was one of those spun off in the Old Bad GM and became part of RACER Trust.

Some of the vehicle's claims are interesting, esp. the 5-star safety rating.


#503 Magoo

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:46

More of your favorite yank tanks...


Here's the latest in the MCG Car Spotter's Guide, the '55-'64 Pontiacs. Every so often Detroit gets it right. These cars were righteous iron. Good units.


MCG Car Spotter's Guide to the 1955-64 Pontiac | Mac's Motor City Garage.com


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#504 Tony Matthews

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:57

Love the artwork.

#505 Magoo

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:59

Love the artwork.


Fitz and Van. They did beautiful stuff.

EDIT: Isn't the '59 Pontiac convertible great? It's like 12 feet wide.

Edited by Magoo, 19 January 2013 - 02:00.


#506 Tony Matthews

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:04

With the amount of artistic license used in those days, it's difficult to know how close the art was to the cars. You have the advantage, as not many of those made it over here! If they were relying on width to sell them, it should have worked.


#507 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:50

Fitz and Van. They did beautiful stuff.

EDIT: Isn't the '59 Pontiac convertible great? It's like 12 feet wide.

Nah, they are only 7 foot wide, the artist has stretched the truth a L O N G way.

#508 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:53

With the amount of artistic license used in those days, it's difficult to know how close the art was to the cars. You have the advantage, as not many of those made it over here! If they were relying on width to sell them, it should have worked.

A job for you Tony, represent some pommy cars that way. A wide Wolsely 24/80. Or a Jag in what should have been proper proportions. To me all Jags looked skinny until the classic XJ series which are still an elegant motorcar. Though I never want to own one!

#509 275 GTB-4

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 06:38

I stumbled upon the following photos during a non-related search.

They were supposedly found in a suitcase in a New South Wales rubbish tip (what's that, a garbage dump?) approximately 12 months ago.

Australian 6 Manufacturing plant in Sydney, early 1924.......thought you all might like to see them......maybe you already have!

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John


The Australian 6/AWA Bldg seems to be little changed in this view...

http://acms.sl.nsw.g...px?itemID=25170

Here is a better view...

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and adding a Sydney icon (for many years)....nothing to do with Australian 6...

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A Suggestion: This thread has moved to some very interesting places....maybe the first two pages (mostly) could be broken away into the original and the remainder turned into an MCG??

Edited by 275 GTB-4, 19 January 2013 - 11:13.


#510 Tony Matthews

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:52

A job for you Tony, represent some pommy cars that way. A wide Wolsely 24/80. Or a Jag in what should have been proper proportions. To me all Jags looked skinny until the classic XJ series which are still an elegant motorcar. Though I never want to own one!

Too late, Lee. It was all done, and in the same period. I can remember Austin Cambridge 'Farina' art that made the car look the size of a Cadillac, with a tiny family standing proudly by.

#511 Catalina Park

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 11:32

The Australian 6/AWA Bldg seems to be little changed in this view...

http://acms.sl.nsw.g...px?itemID=25170

Here is a better view...

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That is actually a different building. There was two buildings with a road up the middle. The first photo is the left hand building, the second one is the right hand one.
There is a lot of photos of the place in the archives when it was AWA.


#512 275 GTB-4

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 08:57

That is actually a different building. There was two buildings with a road up the middle. The first photo is the left hand building, the second one is the right hand one.
There is a lot of photos of the place in the archives when it was AWA.


Thanks CP...well at least we know it looked something like this (AWA Bldg) in that period :drunk:

#513 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 21:02

More Motor City History:

Here's the tale of Murray Body Plant, which is still around today as the Russell Industrial Center. Murray made bodies for a number of classic Fords of the A and V8 era... also Dodge, Hupp, Graham, Willys... most everyone. Includes some fun facts and photos, check it out.


Motor City History: The Murray Body Plant | Mac's Motor City Garage



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#514 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 22:33

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
Too late, Lee. It was all done, and in the same period. I can remember Austin Cambridge 'Farina' art that made the car look the size of a Cadillac, with a tiny family standing proudly by.


There was one Austin 1800 ad that fitted a (smiling) family into the car so well there was room for many more...

What kind of instructions would have issued with the reference photos for such artwork?

And yes, the width of the Pontiacs was surely to back up their 'Wide Track Pontiac' slogan.

#515 Catalina Park

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:40

BMC Australia decided that the Farina body was too narrow and they built a prototype that was 5" wider...

(it is the one on the right!)
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#516 275 GTB-4

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 10:58

BMC Australia decided that the Farina body was too narrow and they built a prototype that was 5" wider...


Issy was told to do the same thing before the Morris Minor went into production :cool:

Edited by 275 GTB-4, 21 January 2013 - 10:58.


#517 Ray Bell

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:28

It would have saved a lot of knuckles if he'd been told that with the Mini...

But I guess the 1100 proved that might not be altogether true.

#518 Greg Locock

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:26

BMC Australia decided that the Farina body was too narrow and they built a prototype that was 5" wider...

(it is the one on the right!)


That's grand old tradition, both ford and Holden have stretched the current europena styling when designing a new model.

In that photo why is Paul Keating in the passenger seat?

#519 Robin Fairservice

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:58

Issy was told to do the same thing before the Morris Minor went into production :cool:

I always understood that the Minor is wide because Issigonis intended the Morris Minor to have a flat four engine, and that Lord Nuffield overode him.

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#520 johnny yuma

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:52

That's grand old tradition, both ford and Holden have stretched the current europena styling when designing a new model.

In that photo why is Paul Keating in the passenger seat?

Best position to occupy before you push the elected driver out !!


#521 275 GTB-4

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:46

I always understood that the Minor is wide because Issigonis intended the Morris Minor to have a flat four engine, and that Lord Nuffield overode him.


I always understood that the Minor was made 5 inches wide because Lord Nuffield overode Issy, who liked the minimalist approach.

Nothing to do with proposed engines.

Nuffield said it looked too narrow.

The body stamps were already made...that is why you see the split bumper bar on early low lights.

#522 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:03

Too late, Lee. It was all done, and in the same period. I can remember Austin Cambridge 'Farina' art that made the car look the size of a Cadillac, with a tiny family standing proudly by.

The early 80s Nissan Bluebird. The 4 cyl limousene. The TV ads showed the car with huge rear legroom, the driver had legs about 12" long! Truth in advertising,, NOT. That was a car that anyone over 5 foot was crammed for legroom in the rear.
Lots of other cars have had similar false claims ofcourse!

#523 Kelpiecross

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 13:20

I always understood that the Minor was made 5 inches wide because Lord Nuffield overode Issy, who liked the minimalist approach.

Nothing to do with proposed engines.

Nuffield said it looked too narrow.

The body stamps were already made...that is why you see the split bumper bar on early low lights.


And why it has a five-inch wide ridge down the centre of the bonnet.

#524 Magoo

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 15:14

Narrowing was also attempted but with disappointing results.




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#525 Ray Bell

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:26

That one would certainly be easier on the knuckles...

Wouldn't it, Catalina? Mick?

#526 275 GTB-4

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:55

Narrowing was also attempted but with disappointing results.

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A little breezy...but ease of access is brilliant! (just watch out for sharp edges) Thanks Quincy :)

#527 gruntguru

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 02:42

I wonder what she does when its raining - point the car so the rain is coming from the left? Worse than sailing - at least you can tack upwind.

#528 Magoo

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 16:49

You folks might enjoy this, especially if you remember the 1959 vs. 2009 Chevrolet crash test video discussed here a while back -- posted by Mariner if I recall. Check out this wild newsreel film from 1960 designed to show off the brand-new Chevrolet Corvair. All kinds of crazy stunts, including crude crash tests staged with various 1959 Chevrolet full-size cars. Also rare proving grounds footage of never-was Corvairs. Early on there's a prototype Corvair that was badged as a "Holden Special" in order to confuse people, which you down-underers might find amusing. LINK:


Video: The 1960 Corvair in Action | Mac's Motor City Garage.com



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#529 desmo

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 23:19

Imagine. If we all drove Corvairs, we wouldn't even need to pave our roads!

My family bought a Corvair when I was a little kid. It didn't run right. The dealer said the factory forgot to install one of the transmission drive gears. Oooops. We ended up with a blue Chevy II instead. That cured us of buying American cars once and for all.



#530 Canuck

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 00:09

Hahaha. I kinda want to go buy a Corvair now...

#531 275 GTB-4

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 00:47

You folks might enjoy this, especially if you remember the 1959 vs. 2009 Chevrolet crash test video discussed here a while back -- posted by Mariner if I recall. Check out this wild newsreel film from 1960 designed to show off the brand-new Chevrolet Corvair. All kinds of crazy stunts, including crude crash tests staged with various 1959 Chevrolet full-size cars. Also rare proving grounds footage of never-was Corvairs. Early on there's a prototype Corvair that was badged as a "Holden Special" in order to confuse people, which you down-underers might find amusing. LINK:


Video: The 1960 Corvair in Action | Mac's Motor City Garage.com



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Brilliant...maybe Ralph Nader should have seen this film :)

#532 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:29

As I commented on Macs site doesnt everyone use their pasenger cars like that? I did when young, my father did for about 70 years.
I took my EH Holden places that bogged Landrovers, beaches, so called impassable roads. Though the poor thing did have the occasional rattle and squeak
.
My fathers cars were usually more shiny on the bottom than the top from driving around farm paddocks and earthmoving jobs.

Even a couple of years ago I drove [carefully in the near dry] all around the 4wd roads in the Flinders Ranges with an AU Falcon. Scraped the exhaust on occasion and tore the rear tyres to shreds but otherwise no problem.

The storys about rich cockys using their Rollers like such is quite true, I have seen it. A blanket on the back seat to carry sick lambs!

#533 gruntguru

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 06:22

Brilliant...maybe Ralph Nader should have seen this film :)

Exactly - he would have seen that you can still open some of the doors after a rollover.

#534 Magoo

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 22:04

Due to popular demand, Mac’s Motor City Garage has circled back with another huge photo gallery of celebrities and their cars. Big fun, check it out. I'm counting on you guys for proofeading.



Cars and Stars--Volume Two | Mac's Motor City Garage.com


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#535 Magoo

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 21:59

Conceived in Detroit, built in Birmingham: Presenting the halfbreed Yank Tank, the Nash Metropolitan.


Another Look at the Nash Metropolitan | Mac's Motor City Garage.com



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#536 Magoo

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 22:06

Keen to hear what Brits and BMC enthusiasts think of the Met. No holds barred.

#537 Tony Matthews

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 22:57

I thought them odd, but without the charm of the Mini. I generally like 'odd' cars, but the Nash Metropolitan obviously wasn't odd enough for me.

#538 275 GTB-4

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 23:10

Keen to hear what Brits and BMC enthusiasts think of the Met. No holds barred.


Think it was just too old fashioned looking for the swinging 60s when the Brit motoring revolution was moving apace....

Edited by 275 GTB-4, 05 February 2013 - 23:11.


#539 Catalina Park

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:32

For 1954 it was probably a good thing. By 1962 it was looking quite outdated.
It is a pity that a real facelift wasn't planned in about 58/59 maybe a proper Farina job.

BMC probably in theory replaced the Metropolitan sales in the USA with the MG1100 in 1962 and later on with the Austin America.
Could an ADO16 (1100) based Metropolitan replacement been an idea for Rambler dealers?

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#540 275 GTB-4

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:09

Let it go Mike... ADO16 (1100) would not have saved the world even with all the marketing clout Britain could muster....it might have floated on fluid...but its just one up from the District Nurses run-about :rotfl: :wave:

#541 Magoo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 12:35

I thought them odd, but without the charm of the Mini. I generally like 'odd' cars, but the Nash Metropolitan obviously wasn't odd enough for me.


Were there many around in the UK?

#542 Magoo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 12:37

Think it was just too old fashioned looking for the swinging 60s when the Brit motoring revolution was moving apace....


Great point. Was originally designed in 1949 and they were still flogging very much the same car in 1962.


#543 Magoo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 12:42

For 1954 it was probably a good thing. By 1962 it was looking quite outdated.
It is a pity that a real facelift wasn't planned in about 58/59 maybe a proper Farina job.

BMC probably in theory replaced the Metropolitan sales in the USA with the MG1100 in 1962 and later on with the Austin America.
Could an ADO16 (1100) based Metropolitan replacement been an idea for Rambler dealers?


I don't know but I don't think BMC ever had rights to market the Metropolitan in the USA. They were sold here by Nash and Hudson dealers, then AMC Rambler dealers once the merger was accomplished. There are a few Mets with Hudson badging.

#544 275 GTB-4

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 12:50

Great point. Was originally designed in 1949 and they were still flogging very much the same car in 1962.


and that, dear friends, is what largely brought down the UK Motor manufacturing behemoth....an ounce of failure to move with the times but mostly too many models to promote and manufacture in a slow market

[Hey MaGwaaaaaar...recommend you get yourself a copy of "Made in Dagenham"...great little movie which encapsulates the struggles and the problems of the time :up: :) ]

Edited by 275 GTB-4, 06 February 2013 - 12:51.


#545 Kelpiecross

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 12:56

Great point. Was originally designed in 1949 and they were still flogging very much the same car in 1962.



Wasn't the Metropolitan just a rebodied Austin A40?

#546 Tony Matthews

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 13:10

Were there many around in the UK?

I have no idea how many there were Nationwide - Coast to Coast (That makes the UK sound a lot bigger than it is, and rather cool) but I remember seeing one regularly, in torquoise and cream/off white, and occasionally one other, usually when I was waiting for the bus to Tech College. Perhaps they were checking up on me...

#547 Magoo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 14:51

Wasn't the Metropolitan just a rebodied Austin A40?


A40 was BOF while the Met was unit construction and half a foot shorter.

#548 Kelpiecross

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 03:35

A40 was BOF while the Met was unit construction and half a foot shorter.


My mistake - I should have read Wiki first. Certainly in Oz they were always described (amongst the ignorant apparently) as being a rebodied A40 - and I suppose in reality this is very much what they were. I also recall that they were generally regarded as being very odd-looking. There were some very nice-looking US-styled cars in Oz in the fifties - the '55 Customline being my favourite. Compared to the neat styling of the '55 Cusso the Metropolitan was extremely odd-looking.

#549 Magoo

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 13:35

My mistake - I should have read Wiki first. Certainly in Oz they were always described (amongst the ignorant apparently) as being a rebodied A40 - and I suppose in reality this is very much what they were. I also recall that they were generally regarded as being very odd-looking. There were some very nice-looking US-styled cars in Oz in the fifties - the '55 Customline being my favourite. Compared to the neat styling of the '55 Cusso the Metropolitan was extremely odd-looking.


Indeed -- for the first two years of production the Met used the 1200cc A40 engine (but with various A30 and A35 chassis and driveline bits). In 1956 the car was upgraded to the 1.5L BMC B engine.

...The Metropolitan was not originally designed by Nash but by an independent industrial designer in Detroit, Bill Flajole. He based the prototype on a Fiat Topolino chassis. There are some neat photos of the car under construction in case anyone is interested.


#550 275 GTB-4

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 23:04

However, Australia has re-engined or equipped a few vehicles originating overseas. So A40 mechanicals may have been utilised as a rationalisation.

We even had a car here largely made from bits and pieces from other cars!

http://en.wikipedia....i/Morris_Marina

Edited by 275 GTB-4, 07 February 2013 - 23:04.