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Indianapolis 500 - the first 100 years


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#51 B Squared

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 17:05

Brian: my first year was 1961 when Jack Brabham arrived with the Kimberly/Cooper. Really set the place on its ear. I remember stories about his drivers test and the consistency he showed lap after lap. I will post more early stuff as we go along here. visit my web page in the mean time for a lot of good old stuff from the Brick yard. Regards, Ron Nelson www.classicvintagemotorsports.com

Ron, my apologies for missing this. I look forward to seeing more of your beautiful photos. Hopefully we'll see each other in the coming months at the track.

:up: Great Thread. Wonderful pictures and memories from a certain Mr.Squared :rotfl:
My favourites were the two I attended.
1) The 1995 Indy 505...(Watching JV come from 2 laps down to get the win after various pace car infractions)
2) Last year, The 2010 500 where I was able to witness up close my pal Dario win in convincing fashion.

Interesting that you point this out Amphicar...I too attended a live satellite broadcast of that very race. It was in Encino California. I snuck out of the house at 7 am and stood in line at the theatre to buy a ticket with money I had stolen from my Mom's purse. We had just returned from the South of France where my Dad was working on GrandPrix. Having just witnessed the F1 race in Monaco a few days prior there was no stopping me now..(Life over, car racing in the blood forever.)


Jon, you are too kind. I can certainly relate to "Life over, car racing in the blood forever". It seems to go with the territory for most of us. It must have been something to be there with Dario to share in the win. He will be as tough to beat this year as anybody. Make sure you let me know if you can be in Indy this year. It will be good to catch up when possible.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway today unveiled the ticket for the 2011 race.

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edit: correct spelling

Edited by B Squared, 11 March 2011 - 12:24.


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#52 jonpollak

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 18:34

As Jon Lovitz would say,
'Yeah,....That's the ticket.'
Jp

Edited by jonpollak, 10 March 2011 - 18:35.


#53 DogEarred

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 12:05

"First, what is your most memorable moment?"

Mine was 3 or 4 years ago when the heavens opened on the slow down lap and there was a local tornado warning. I remember looking around at 400,000 spectors and bursting out laughing when the track commentor drawled " Clear the stands immediately...."

For me, each whole event is memorable. The track layout doesn't always allow for much great racing, more for the "great moments" perhaps and great drives such as Mears, Fittipaldi, Villeneuve, Luyendyck, Montoya & others.

I first took notice of the race when Clark won, then followed it in the press after that. I had always been a bit of a 'racing purist' up to then but had my appetite whetted by the visiting Indycars to Silverstone & Brands.
I had the opportunity to go to the 1986 event where Rahal won for his terminally ill team owner. I have been going nearly every year since and have changed my attitude to the event & U.S. racing in general. I've actually come to enjoy the traditional things - even the downtown parade!

It's a great moment each year, just seeing the field coming through Turn 1...



#54 B Squared

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 13:54

Mine was 3 or 4 years ago when the heavens opened on the slow down lap and there was a local tornado warning. I remember looking around at 400,000 spectors and bursting out laughing when the track commentor drawled " Clear the stands immediately...."

I had always been a bit of a 'racing purist' up to then but had my appetite whetted by the visiting Indycars to Silverstone & Brands.

It's a great moment each year, just seeing the field coming through Turn 1...


In 2007 Dario Franchitti completed 166 laps when the rains came - 180 laps for Buddy Rice in 2004, so there technically was no slow down lap as they didn't complete the full race distance. I don't recall "Clear the stands immediately...." either time. The management are not going to provoke a stampede. In 2004 there were close to 20 tornadoes in the immediate area. My family ended up in the middle of one in the Anderson, IN area on the way home.

Hard to get more purist than running at a relatively unchanged track configuration for 100 years.

Agreed.




#55 DogEarred

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 15:23

In 2007 Dario Franchitti completed 166 laps when the rains came - 180 laps for Buddy Rice in 2004, so there technically was no slow down lap as they didn't complete the full race distance. I don't recall "Clear the stands immediately...." either time. The management are not going to provoke a stampede. In 2004 there were close to 20 tornadoes in the immediate area. My family ended up in the middle of one in the Anderson, IN area on the way home.

Hard to get more purist than running at a relatively unchanged track configuration for 100 years.

Agreed.


Thanks for the details - well remembered, Sir!

Must have been 2007 then, as the race stopped. Admittedly, hat announcement was made only once though. As you infer, not the kind of thing you would want to hear.
Walking away from the track, a local family kindly insisted we sheltered in their basement until the warning was over.
Yes, 2004 was filthy & scary weather. Caused some damage in town, too.

#56 eldougo

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 04:42

I may upset a few people with this statement. However i really loved the INDY 500 from when i was a kid back in the 50,s and that feeling stayed right up through the USAC day and CART days. I would get up early to watch it live or a late night rerun just to see the 500. Until it went to IRL and to my way of thinking it has never been the same ,to me it seems like watching a B grade race compared to what i have been accustomed to over the years.
I know they are doing the high speeds and it on the same track with lots of safety features built in today.I even turned down the commentary thinking they were what was interfering with the feel or vibe i got before.SADLY this did not work and i watch it and appreciate what it about HOWEVER it just not the same.

So my most memorable moment is anything up till the 2004 race when IRL began.

#57 B Squared

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 05:26

So my most memorable moment is anything up till the 2004 race when IRL began.


The IRL began with the 1996 race.

#58 Gerr

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 05:37

I may upset a few people with this statement. However i really loved the INDY 500 from when i was a kid back in the 50,s and that feeling stayed right up through the USAC day and CART days. I would get up early to watch it live or a late night rerun just to see the 500. Until it went to IRL and to my way of thinking it has never been the same ,to me it seems like watching a B grade race compared to what i have been accustomed to over the years.
I know they are doing the high speeds and it on the same track with lots of safety features built in today.I even turned down the commentary thinking they were what was interfering with the feel or vibe i got before.SADLY this did not work and i watch it and appreciate what it about HOWEVER it just not the same.

So my most memorable moment is anything up till the 2004 race when IRL began.


The IRL began in 2004?

#59 eldougo

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 06:06

Correction to my last line in post #56


The Indy Racing League was founded in 1994 by Tony George and began racing in 1996.

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#60 B Squared

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 14:39

Another fond memory for me associated with the Indy 500 is shown in the following photo, taken by my brother, in the fall of 1995. Along with Dad, we went up to Coldwater, MI to Brayton Engineering to visit with Scott and Lee Brayton. Scott had just installed carbon fibre brakes on his Indy Buick powered Cobra replica and was proudly showing us the work. I have a picture from a "hot rod" magazine where the photographer and Scott were lapping at Michigan International Speedway in this car. The speedometer showing 180+ mph. Never got a ride in this beast, unfortunately.

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#61 Bob Riebe

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 17:41

The IRL began in 2004?

It took that long for TG's dream to turn fully into CART II and be totally screwed by him.

I had slim hope for what the one hundredth anniversary would be but I guess I was overly optimistic.


#62 RA Historian

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 20:49

TG's dream = racing's nightmare!

#63 grandprix61

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 05:14

TG's dream = racing's nightmare!

Just think where American open wheel racing would be today without the millionaires fighting over their toys. We all talk about the good old days and we remember the good times and fun we had. It was a much more dangerous sport to be in and around. I found this shot of the fourth turn and it was taken in 1961. A long time ago I guess. But take a look at the lack of safety for drivers and fans. Entering the pits had to be a real challenge. Also, not much of a wall protecting the spectators either. I remember walking down the back straight when a car lost a wheel in turn one. The tire went by me on the grass doing about 60 miles an hour. Enough to do serious damage if it hit you. Luckily when they announced the crash I turned and watched the tire coming flying around corner two. As a young photographer I learned that day to never turn your back on the action and to walk backwords when along side the track. A pretty wild place in those 60's as we all remember. More early Indy stuff on
www.classicvintagemotorsports.com thanks for looking. Ron

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#64 stevewf1

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 06:57

I spent a lot of time at the track in the 1960s. The Novi, rear-engined "funny cars", the roadsters, a twin-engined Porsche, turbo-Offys, turbines, that side-car thing, wider tires, drivers from all over the world.

Sighhhh...


#65 E1pix

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 07:26

Just think where American open wheel racing would be today without the millionaires fighting over their toys. We all talk about the good old days and we remember the good times and fun we had.


When money becomes #1.... all else becomes #2.

#66 B Squared

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 12:39

Entering the pits had to be a real challenge.


With no pit lane speed limit, it was quite exciting to watch.

#67 stevewf1

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 00:35

With no pit lane speed limit, it was quite exciting to watch.


I remember being there during practice, before the speed limits and watching them blast into the pits. And it was exciting. I read somewhere that during the 1990 race, Arie Luyendyk said he was hitting the pit lane entrance at 220 mph.




#68 Amphicar

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 21:28

:up: Great Thread. Wonderful pictures and memories from a certain Mr.Squared :rotfl:
My favourites were the two I attended.
1) The 1995 Indy 505...(Watching JV come from 2 laps down to get the win after various pace car infractions)
2) Last year, The 2010 500 where I was able to witness up close my pal Dario win in convincing fashion.



Interesting that you point this out Amphicar...I too attended a live satellite broadcast of that very race. It was in Encino California. I snuck out of the house at 7 am and stood in line at the theatre to buy a ticket with money I had stolen from my Mom's purse. We had just returned from the South of France where my Dad was working on GrandPrix. Having just witnessed the F1 race in Monaco a few days prior there was no stopping me now..(Life over, car racing in the blood forever.)

Jp

Because of the time difference, the race started in the early evening here - which was good because it meant that my friend and I were able to get to the cinema after school. Unfortunately the delayed re-start after the first lap accident and the confusion at the end meant that by the transmission ended (because the satellite had gone over the horizon) we still didn't know who had won! My friend was a dyed in the wool Jim Clark fan while I was a Graham Hill supporter so we argued about it all the way home and until the following Thursday, when Motoring News gave me my answer - though my friend remained a Clark hold-out (just like Colin Chapman).

#69 B Squared

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 08:27

From today's IndyStar. I planned on watching the NCAA basketball tournament on Sunday, but I suddenly have an urge to drive south.

Winning cars on display

The showroom of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum comes alive with only Indianapolis 500-winning cars Sunday, and that's how it will stay until June 1.

Sixty-seven cars representing 71 wins will be on display, including the entire Penske Racing collection that normally resides in Scottsdale, Ariz.

The Speedway display includes all four cars that won two races -- 1939-40, 1947-48, 1953-54 and 1957-58 -- and almost every winning car since 1939. Some recent winners are still in use.

Marco Andretti has used Dan Wheldon's 2005 winner each year in the 500 since, and Dario Franchitti's 2007 winner will be Ryan Hunter-Reay's backup car this year. Scott Dixon's 2008 winner will be his own backup. Franchitti plans to use last year's winner as his primary car.

The car that traveled the farthest for this display is Buddy Rice's 2004 winner, which normally is housed at the Honda Collection Hall at Motegi.

As part of the exhibit's opening, there will be an autograph session Sunday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. with Rick Mears, Bobby Unser, Al Unser Jr., Arie Luyendyk and Gil de Ferran. Admission is $5.



#70 B Squared

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 12:39

I started collecting Indianapolis 500 pit badges in the mid-'60's, the first I bought was from 1957, my Dad's first race at the Speedway. I've since acquired from 1947 to present and have them displayed in a glass topped front tire from a mid-'80's IndyCar. The 1960 badge (#2) belonged to Mrs. Tony Hulman. The 1971 badge was given to me by a unknown member of Peter Revson's 2nd placed Team McLaren after the race. I couldn't afford the 1946 badge as either a kid or now, but it was fun to pick up what I could over the years. I've never been able to properly identify the era of the "IMS" pin or the early wings and wheel that are at the top on either side of the 1947 badge. Any ideas?

photo: B²
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#71 E1pix

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 21:57

Marco Andretti has used Dan Wheldon's 2005 winner each year in the 500 since, and Dario Franchitti's 2007 winner will be Ryan Hunter-Reay's backup car this year. Scott Dixon's 2008 winner will be his own backup. Franchitti plans to use last year's winner as his primary car.


Not so long ago, a year-old chassis was uncompetitive. I'm surely stating the obvious here, but having older chassis still being competitive speaks volumes about the future of Indy Car here in the States. This is a good thing for budgets to be sure, and might just indicate that the spec chassis idea was the only way to save our prime formula.

Bravo to the rulesmakers, I for one hope the Glory Days of the past are returning. I think we all miss pre-1996 Indy Car, the next challenge may well be having more homegrowns on the grid.






#72 B Squared

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 08:46

IMS has been producing a series of centennial memories. This one features Dan Gurney, a favorite of mine and many others.

http://auto-racing.s...tennial-feature

#73 Flat Black 84

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 14:02

I think we all miss pre-1996 Indy Car, the next challenge may well be having more homegrowns on the grid.


Yeah, there were only six Yanks out of 26 drivers in yesterday's Redneck Grand Prix. Pretty decent race, though.

#74 Tmeranda

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 15:35

Yeah, there were only six Yanks out of 26 drivers in yesterday's Redneck Grand Prix. Pretty decent race, though.



And that is exactly why the race has lost its fan base here in the US. I'm a big race fan, and I can't identify most of these imported drivers. During the 60's I used to hitch hike 1000s of miles to see the race. Now I won't cross the street to see these guys (as good as they are) race.

#75 Bob Riebe

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 16:59

Yeah, there were only six Yanks out of 26 drivers in yesterday's Redneck Grand Prix. Pretty decent race, though.

I miss the '96-'99 IRL.
With the new century came less and less to watch, with it finally imploding into a spec. series with unknown drivers.

I equally miss the old Road to Indy shows.

Edited by Bob Riebe, 11 April 2011 - 17:00.


#76 Flat Black 84

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 17:59

If spec racing is supposed to make the races competitive, it ain't working in 2011: Franchitti dominated at St. Petes and Power in Alabammy. But hopefully the variegated aero packages next season will shake things up a bit.

#77 Flat Black 84

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 19:12

I think people everywhere--not just in the US--find it easier to cheer for the hometown boy than a guy born and raised 12,000 miles away. That's one reason the Olympics and the World Cup generate such passion.

Now I certainly don't resent foreign drivers, and I prefer many of them to the domestics, but you can bet you're bottom shilling I'd be pulling like mad for a driver from my hometown who happened to make the big leagues.

#78 Amphicar

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 22:50

I'm guessing that the paucity of US drivers is because (other than the two top outfits), most of the teams aren't able to pay their drivers but rely on drivers paying them (or bringing sponsorship with them). I also guess that there are more foreign drivers willing and able to pay or bring sponsorship than there are US drivers in that position. If I'm correct, this points to a structural weakness in IndyCar that could lead to a downward spiral, with falling interest in the series by US audiences leading to less incentive for US companies to sponsor teams, leading to more foreign pay drivers ... and so on. If so, it is very sad and I fear it will not be easy to break out of the downward spiral.

#79 Rob G

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 00:31

Yeah, there were only six Yanks out of 26 drivers in yesterday's Redneck Grand Prix. Pretty decent race, though.

Last year there were only four, and at the time only two of them (Andretti and Patrick) had confirmed full-season rides. I'm hoping that this year begins a long-term reversal of a twenty-year trend and that we'll see more Americans get a shot against some of the best from around the world.

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#80 Flat Black 84

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 14:45

And of course stock car racing has eclipsed open-wheel racing in Americans' hearts. If you want to be hip (as opposed to cool), you gun for NASCAR and Daytona rather than IRL and Indy. US drivers 30 years ago could not have imagined such a reversal in popularity. I can only hope there's another reversal and that I live to see it.

#81 Bob Riebe

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 03:01

And of course stock car racing has eclipsed open-wheel racing in Americans' hearts. If you want to be hip (as opposed to cool), you gun for NASCAR and Daytona rather than IRL and Indy. US drivers 30 years ago could not have imagined such a reversal in popularity. I can only hope there's another reversal and that I live to see it.

Indy is still number one as far as prestige, and Daytona is not anywhere near what it once was, but the money is in NASCAR and that is where the drivers go.



#82 lanciaman

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 11:24

Indy is still number one as far as prestige, and Daytona is not anywhere near what it once was, but the money is in NASCAR and that is where the drivers go.



I heard Cheever say the defining expression of his career is "Winner of the Indianapolis 500." Other winners have said likewise, that all else pales by comparison. It would be interesting to know what it meant to WDCs like Clark and Hill.

#83 Amphicar

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 13:07

I heard Cheever say the defining expression of his career is "Winner of the Indianapolis 500." Other winners have said likewise, that all else pales by comparison. It would be interesting to know what it meant to WDCs like Clark and Hill.

Wonder how Mario Andretti rated winning the Indy 500 in comparison to his WDC?

#84 Flat Black 84

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 13:50

Indy is still number one as far as prestige, and Daytona is not anywhere near what it once was, but the money is in NASCAR and that is where the drivers go.


Indy may well still be the single most prestigious race on the planet (winning it is roughly analagous to winning the Heisman Trophy), but I fear IRL and open-wheel racing in general have dropped off the radar in the US. Except for among some of the old-timers, NASCAR is unfortunately where it's at.

#85 Niky

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 13:50

Hi to all! Thanks for this post!

Best memories...? Wow, that's a difficult question! So many close finish, and good stories! Granatelli's victory, Bobby Unser & Mario Andretti race in 1981... http://www.youtube.c...;feature=fvwrel

Maybe one of my favorite moments was seeing Emerson Fittipaldi crossing Victory Lane in 1993 while I was working as a guest-commentator on TV. I was so emotional I couldn't even finished what I was saying... :rotfl:

And two more personal moments: When I discovered Caracciola's trophies at the Museum, and when I spent 15 minutes seating on the pavement, late at night, Turn 2, moon in the sky, total silence. I closed my eyes and just enjoyed the special moment. Indy is a magical, magical place.

I love the stories related to Jim Clark & Chapman at Indianapolis. Unfortunately, I was not there!

Here is a 1911 Newsreel... Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.c...w...&playnext=1

Edited by Niky, 17 April 2011 - 01:22.


#86 Niky

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 18:30

Another cool centennial moment :)

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related



#87 E1pix

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 23:27

Maybe one of my favorite moments was seeing Emerson Fittipaldi crossing Victory Lane in 1993 while I was working as a guest-commentator on TV. I was so emotional I couldn't even finished what I was saying... :rotfl:


I love your recollection!

Mine without question was watching my friend and client Buddy Lazier winning in 1996, wearing a helmet scheme I designed in 1990 (and now his up and coming karters kids both wear it).

Say what you will about the IRL split, I get that, but seeing one's art in Victory Lane at Indy is a call to the hankie box. I'll never forget it.


#88 Flat Black 84

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 14:59

Maybe one of my favorite moments was seeing Emerson Fittipaldi crossing Victory Lane in 1993 while I was working as a guest-commentator on TV. I was so emotional I couldn't even finished what I was saying... :rotfl:


You should have just bellowed out, "GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOAL!" and commenced to bawling.
:drunk:



#89 Niky

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 01:24

You should have just bellowed out, "GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOAL!" and commenced to bawling.
:drunk:



:rotfl:

#90 B Squared

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 11:54

From today's Indy Star and Curt Cavin.

Iconic cars and drivers

Parnelli Jones, the Indianapolis 500 winner in 1963, will drive the event's inaugural winning car, the No. 32 Marmon Wasp, in prerace ceremonies next month. It will be only the third time the Wasp has been driven on race day since Ray Harroun won with it in 1911. One was in 1961, when Jones was a rookie.

Jones is part of a growing list of former 500 winners who will drive iconic cars at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in the hours leading up to the 100th anniversary race.

Mario Andretti (1969 winner) will drive the Boyle Maserati Wilbur Shaw won with in 1939-40.

Al Unser (1970, '71, '78 and '87 winner) will drive the Lotus in which Jim Clark won the '65 race, which was Unser's rookie year.

Bobby Unser (1968, '75 and '81 winner) will drive the No. 8 National that Joe Dawson drove to victory in '12. That car has a riding mechanic seat to be filled by Unser's wife, Lisa.

Johnny Rutherford (1974, '76 and '80 winner) will drive his '80 "Yellow Submarine" car.

Tom Sneva (1983 winner) will drive the Belond Salih-Offy that won in '57 with Sam Hanks and '58 with Jimmy Bryan.

Bobby Rahal (1986 winner) will drive the No. 14 Miller that Louis Meyer used to win in '28.

Arie Luyendyk (1990 and '97 winner) will drive the Domino's Pizza Lola in which he set the race record for speed in '90.

Unser Jr. (1992 and '94 winner) will drive the Blue Crown Spark Plug Special that Mauri Rose won with in 1947-48.

Kenny Brack (1999 winner) will drive the Ganassi Racing car that Juan Pablo Montoya won with in 2000.

Gil de Ferran (2003 winner) will drive the Sunoco McLaren in which Mark Donohue took Roger Penske to victory lane for the first time, in 1972.

Also, May 28 has been designated A.J. Foyt Day. This is the 50th anniversary of the first of his four wins, in 1961. He'll be available for a Q&A and autographs.



#91 Flat Black 84

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 13:54

Very cool, Brian. I wonder how they arrived at those particular car/driver pairings?

#92 BloodandSmoke

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 23:20

Hi, this is Charles Leerhsen, the author of Blood and Smoke: A True Tale of Mystery, Mayhem and the Birth of the Indy 500, to be published on May 3 by Simon and Schuster. It's a deep and hopefully exhilarating dive into the early car culture, the origins of auto racing and, of course, the first 500-mile sweepstakes, conducted 100 years ago this spring. "History comes alive," says Kirkus Reviews, "a fascinating tale." You can learn more about the book at my website: www.charlesleerhsen.com, but I'd be happy to try and answer any questions here.

#93 arttidesco

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 16:22

Not sure why, much less how I stumbled across these links of the 1982 PPG Pace Car just now, but having seen it I wonder if anyone has any photo's of it performing its Pace Car duties at Indy or elsewhere ?

#94 arttidesco

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:01

It is with great sadness that I have to share with you that Ed Arnaudin whose photo's I shared with you in post 36 of this blog past away aged 82 on April the 3rd.

His son Steve who has forwarded scans of many of Ed's slides has agreed it would be a fitting tribute to Ed to share some of Ed's photo's taken at Indy between 1960 and 1983 (not all years) on this thread and in my blog.

With that in mind I wonder if anyone can help me identify these four vehicles which I am posting in what I assume to be in order of vehicle age. The only reliable reference I have is some drawings in Tommaso Tommasi's From Brands Hatch to Indianapolis from which I have established that none of these cars were winners at Indy. (Waits for chorus to be proved wrong :rolleyes: )

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These first two were taken in 1964

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The second two in the pit lane were taken in 1962

Any help you can give me with the identity, year/s of competition , drivers (original or photographed here out of period) would be much appreciated and duly credited in forth coming blogs which I'll link to this thread.

Thanking you in anticipation of your responses.

#95 E.B.

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:09

Well, the top one does look like Rene Thomas' winning Delage from 1914 to me.


#96 arttidesco

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:19

Thanks E.B I see the resemblance with the drawing of the Type Y now, was fooled by the missing bonnet / hood :up:

#97 E.B.

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:20

The number 34 car looks like the Studebaker driven by Tony Gulotta in the 1933 race.


#98 arttidesco

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:38

Thanks again EB a Studebaker President ? :up:

#99 E.B.

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:40

Thanks again EB a Studebaker President ? :up:


No, or I'd have spotted Cliff Bergere's number 22, which finished 3rd in 1932!

The other car is Earl Cooper's Stutz that he campaigned throughout 1915.


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#100 arttidesco

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 18:47

Thanks for the correction and Stutz info, ref the Studebaker I got the President from this page, would I be correct in thinking the #34 is a 250 cui Commander ?