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Being more successfull after comeback


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#1 HistoryFan

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 20:22

The first season after the comback of Michael Schumacher is over. He didn't as much impress as in his first career.
Many sports men are not as good as they were in their first career.

But who in racing was faster after the comeback (two or more years without racing, or with only fun races as Schumacher did)?
Lauda was champion again, but I think he also was not as good as before as he had strong problems with Prost's speed...
Perhaps in another series?

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#2 BRG

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 20:40

I don't think there are many candidates. Andretti had most of two seasons away from F1 and came back to be WDC. Prost had a year out and won the WDC on his return. Who else is there? Not Mansell of course!

#3 David McKinney

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 20:46

Pedro Rodriguez after his second or third comeback

#4 Tim Murray

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 20:48

Of the drivers who had their careers forcibly interrupted by World War 2, Wimille and Farina achieved far more, in terms of results, in their second careers.

#5 HistoryFan

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 21:10

I don't think there are many candidates. Andretti had most of two seasons away from F1 and came back to be WDC. Prost had a year out and won the WDC on his return. Who else is there? Not Mansell of course!


Yes after only one season being out of action, but the questions was about two or more.
And Prost wasn't as good as before I think. He had the best car, not more...

The question also was not only Formula One...

#6 elansprint72

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 22:12

If I may expand this thread slightly into sport, rather than just Motor Sport: not Lance Armstrong. However Reg Harris, having looked at the "modern greats" decided he could thrash them and did. There are examples in other sporting events, although mainly in those disciplines which involve sitting down. It seems that folks who have been supreme in their chosen field, sometimes do not know when to get off the merry-go-round. Boxers, it seems, do not know when to quit, ever. :rolleyes:

JYS is an example of someone who did, in "our" field.

Apologies for the diversion, this looks like being an interesting discussion.

#7 Vitesse2

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 01:11

"Our Noige" whined announced his forthcoming retirement from the sport at the end of the season after the 1990 British GP and then rescinded the decision when Frank Williams offered him loadsamoney. He definitely did better afterwards ...

#8 scran

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 03:17

Did Mike Hailwood have a break between his four wheel racing efforts?

#9 RA Historian

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 03:22

Emerson Fittipaldi? World Champion in '72 and '74, won last GPs in '75, puttered around with his and brother Wilson's team from '76 through '80 before hanging up his helmet. After winding up his own woebegone team after '82 he went home to Brazil. But in '84 he was coaxed back into action in the US, first in a March GTP car, then in CART. He was immensely successful in this second career, with 22 CART wins, one championship and two Indy 500 wins. I'll grant that it may be a bit difficult to compare his F-1 and Indy Car careers, but he was very successful in both.

Tom

#10 Zeroninety

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 05:22

Emerson Fittipaldi? World Champion in '72 and '74, won last GPs in '75, puttered around with his and brother Wilson's team from '76 through '80 before hanging up his helmet. After winding up his own woebegone team after '82 he went home to Brazil. But in '84 he was coaxed back into action in the US, first in a March GTP car, then in CART. He was immensely successful in this second career, with 22 CART wins, one championship and two Indy 500 wins. I'll grant that it may be a bit difficult to compare his F-1 and Indy Car careers, but he was very successful in both.

Tom


And in 1993, he he finished a fairly close second in the Indycar points to the reigning WDC.

#11 Stefan Schmidt

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 06:00

Not Brambilla of course...

#12 David McKinney

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 06:38

Did Mike Hailwood have a break between his four wheel racing efforts?

Yes. Excellent example
Another (from the same period) would be Revson

#13 fuzzi

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 07:08

Clemente Biondetti also did well after World War II winning three Mille Miglias and driving with much of his old fire.

Achille Varzi had a much longer lay off and was said to be just as fast post war, and he'd had the drugs nightmare to get over too.

Closer to home Reg Parnell was more successful post war than before.

#14 john aston

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 07:14

I would suggest that Niki Lauda was an even better driver on his comeback than before; not quite as quick but even more consistent and mistake free.

#15 Doug Nye

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 09:27

In F1 terms...Peter Revson.

DCN


#16 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 09:52

From Graham Howard's report on the 1960 Australian Grand Prix (in the AGP book), Lex Davison undertook some lessons in Europe during one of his retirements and came back better than ever in his Aston Martin that year...

Niel Allen also had a brief retirement after his '68 crash and I believe he was better than ever afterwards.

#17 HistoryFan

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 14:37

Emerson Fittipaldi? World Champion in '72 and '74, won last GPs in '75, puttered around with his and brother Wilson's team from '76 through '80 before hanging up his helmet. After winding up his own woebegone team after '82 he went home to Brazil. But in '84 he was coaxed back into action in the US, first in a March GTP car, then in CART. He was immensely successful in this second career, with 22 CART wins, one championship and two Indy 500 wins. I'll grant that it may be a bit difficult to compare his F-1 and Indy Car careers, but he was very successful in both.

Tom


Yes it's difficult to compare as many IndyCar drivers failed in Formula One. It was an interesting time with many F1 drivers went to IndyCar.


#18 RA Historian

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 15:31

Another (from the same period) would be Revson

As Doug points out, only in F-1. I think that the intent of this thread is those who stepped away from racing entirely. Revson did not. After his initial F-1 foray, Revson was very active in the US, driving Can Am, USRRC, Trans Am, and Indy Cars. Won races in Can Am (1971 Champion), Indy Cars, and Trans Am. Far busier than the years he drove F-1 as his primary focus.
Tom

Edited by RA Historian, 26 November 2010 - 15:32.


#19 Risil

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 15:37

Ayrton Senna went on to a degree of success after his retirement from motor racing in 1981... ;)

There's an interesting variant on this that maybe does qualify as a genuine 'two careers' though. Troy Bayliss was a youth motocrosser and speedway rider until the age of 17, when he packed it in and stayed away from motorcycles for five years. In 1992 he entered some Aussie production bike races, and started the climb towards 250GP, World Superbikes and eventually MotoGP. I believe Steve Plater, who has some BSB wins to go with his 2009 Senior TT, aborted and restarted his career in a similar fashion.

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#20 Rob

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 16:04

There's an interesting variant on this that maybe does qualify as a genuine 'two careers' though. Troy Bayliss was a youth motocrosser and speedway rider until the age of 17, when he packed it in and stayed away from motorcycles for five years. In 1992 he entered some Aussie production bike races, and started the climb towards 250GP, World Superbikes and eventually MotoGP. I believe Steve Plater, who has some BSB wins to go with his 2009 Senior TT, aborted and restarted his career in a similar fashion.


Stefan Bradl did the same thing didn't he? He didn't think he had the ability and retired, but came back and is now a Moto 2 race winner.

#21 Der Pate

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 16:32

Lauda was champion again, but I think he also was not as good as before as he had strong problems with Prost's speed...
Perhaps in another series?


In my opinion Lauda was superior in 1975/76! Nobody could beat him! After his Nürburgring-crash he only did, what had to be done, to become WC. As far as I remember he had much more 2nd places than 1st in 1977. The years after his comeback were only a continue of 1977 - 1979. Therefore you could say Lauda was not as good as the Lauda of the early Ferrari-years, but he was as good as the last Ferrari-year and the Brabham-years.

#22 David McKinney

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 16:46

As Doug points out, only in F-1. I think that the intent of this thread is those who stepped away from racing entirely. Revson did not. After his initial F-1 foray, Revson was very active in the US, driving Can Am, USRRC, Trans Am, and Indy Cars. Won races in Can Am (1971 Champion), Indy Cars, and Trans Am. Far busier than the years he drove F-1 as his primary focus.
Tom

That's not my reading of the initial post, where the only names he mentions were F1 drivers :)
On that basis Revson is a perfect example - not much chop first time around. In fact probably not good enough for a works drive the next year. But a winner when he came back to F1 (regardless of what he'd been doing in between)
I also mentioned Hailwood, who was better second time around, though the extremes between Phase I and Phase II were probably not as great

#23 MoMurray

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 17:25

Stefan Bradl did the same thing didn't he? He didn't think he had the ability and retired, but came back and is now a Moto 2 race winner.


I am sure the moto2 winning Bradl is the son of Stefan.


#24 Les

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 17:28

Revson and Hailwood were certainly two I thought of but mentioned already.

Probably wouldn't say successful but two drivers who had a go at F1, left and came back to establish themselves as regular members of the grid are Pierluigi Martini and Timo Glock. Come to think of it Roberto Moreno had a go with Lotus in the early 80s unsuccessfully but came back later in the decade as a respectable driver.

Edited by Les, 26 November 2010 - 17:30.


#25 Rob

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 18:20

I am sure the moto2 winning Bradl is the son of Stefan.


Helmut Bradl is the father, Stefan is the son :)

#26 RA Historian

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 02:13

That's not my reading of the initial post, where the only names he mentions were F1 drivers :)
On that basis Revson is a perfect example - not much chop first time around. In fact probably not good enough for a works drive the next year. But a winner when he came back to F1 (regardless of what he'd been doing in between)
I also mentioned Hailwood, who was better second time around, though the extremes between Phase I and Phase II were probably not as great

I read it differently, David. Never mentions retirement from just F-1. I took it for complete separation from racing, not just from F-1.

Tom

Edited by RA Historian, 27 November 2010 - 02:14.


#27 Rob G

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 03:15

How about NASCAR driver Curtis Turner? He scored a victory and three top-five finishes in seven Grand National races after serving a "lifetime ban" from NASCAR that lasted several years. In the two years previous to his ban he only had one top-five in 17 races. Aside from a victory in the 1962 Pikes Peak and one USAC Champ Car race in 1963, I don't know of any important races he participated in during the intervening years. Long-term, he wasn't as successful in his second stint as his first, but short-term, it seems as though he was rejuvenated.

#28 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 03:15

What about Bobby Rahal? Not one of me favorite drivers when he was racing but he was initially quite successful in Formula Atlantic and Can-Am but after his unspectacular Formula One debut with Wolf I seem to recall he hung up his helmet.

(I still remember seeing him at a table in the bar at the brand new Hyatt Regency with friends and or family after the very first Montreal Grand Prix. We sat at the bar beside a lone and sullen Jean-Pierre Jarier who had led the race until his JPS Lotus expired.)

It's been a long time and I don't recall the details exactly but he wasn't out of the cockpit for too long before he embarked on a very successful Indy car career.

Bob Mackenzie

#29 Tim Murray

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 06:31

According to Rahal's biography on the F1 Rejects site, Rahal briefly quit racing at the end of his unsuccessful 1976 season in F Atlantic. He came back very quickly, to finish second to Villeneuve in the F Atlantic championship in 1977.

#30 Lola5000

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 07:16

John Goss winning Bathurst in a TWR Jaguar.

#31 HistoryFan

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 11:45

I read it differently, David. Never mentions retirement from just F-1. I took it for complete separation from racing, not just from F-1.

Tom


Yes, I want drivers who withdraw from racing, not only F1 (and for two or more years!). Schumacher did some races as well, but were that really serious races? I think, no...

#32 RA Historian

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 16:23

What about Bobby Rahal? Not one of me favorite drivers when he was racing but he was initially quite successful in Formula Atlantic and Can-Am but after his unspectacular Formula One debut with Wolf I seem to recall he hung up his helmet.

Nope, never retired after his two outings with Wolf at the end of 1978. In fact, he was very busy. In 1979 he ran Formula 2 in Europe in a Chevron, at least for the first half of the season. Then he came back to the US and ran Herb Caplan's Prophet in the Can Am II series, doing very well with one win. Continued to drive the Prophet in 1980, and did a half season in 1981 in a Paul Newman March 817. Along with all this action, he also was a frequent competitor in the IMSA Camel GT series in various Porsche 935s.
Tom