Jump to content


Photo

The photographers' thread


  • Please log in to reply
1506 replies to this topic

#101 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,227 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 22 January 2011 - 11:01

The first photographer to register with me was Victor Blackman who had a column in Amateur Photographer which was the first page I turned to each edition.

David


Yes, me too.


Advertisement

#102 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,561 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 22 January 2011 - 11:02

A few from 2010...
Posted Image


Whilst I'm not a big motor cycle fan, that's a really good shot, Simon. There's something about the poise and facial expression of the rider - a clear sense of trepidation! It has a discernible - although admittedly obvious - human element that is lost in so many pictures today because you simply can't see the rider or driver. All you have is shapes and colours. And I'm guessing as you go about your job you are regularly struggling at a number of the newer circuits to get anything other than car, track, kerb and coloured run-off area in the frame.

The picture at the VSCC Cadwell Park meeting that David has posted has a lovely background and good composition and we can see three cars in non-obstructing view. Most of today's shots really lack atmosphere. If you look for a few moments you can almost feel that you could be there at Cadwell because of the sense of place that picture creates.

I feel quite inspired by this thread (and the Kodachrome one) to the point that I have been fishing out my old SLR kit......yikes.

Edited by MCS, 22 January 2011 - 11:03.


#103 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,132 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 11:48

My F2 SB will also do its best to stay out of the wet, though I see Sover Wong (www.soverf2repair.webs.com) can add extra rear-door seals as part of his dedicated F2 overhaul service, though of course that wouldn't help with leaks around the prism. Doesn't seem to mind the cold too much though - this was in the Czech Rep a couple or three years ago, with temperatures dropping to a balmy -15C or so (chilly enough for the camera body to be quite painful to touch with an ungloved hand).

Posted Image


#104 Graham Gauld

Graham Gauld
  • Member

  • 1,134 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 22 January 2011 - 13:39


In the early 1970's I went over to Sweden in February each year for the International Swedish Rally. I remember that in 1977 being out on a stage at about 0300 and the temperature was -41 degrees but, thankfully, it was dry. For the previous three years I had changed from Leica to Canon with the original Canon reflex, the Canonflex. One of my friends back then was a hoary old Swedish rally photographer Lars Olaf Magnil . He was still using his old Leica had no trouble at all during those low temperatures but my Canon acted up badly with a slow stuttering shutter ending up with wildly overexposed shots. The Canon was a great camera - I still use Canon (5D) - but cannot fail to acknowledge that the Leica was probably the better all round camera at the time if not still today.

#105 Simon Arron

Simon Arron
  • Member

  • 2,260 posts
  • Joined: November 06

Posted 22 January 2011 - 14:16

Pentax's weather seals have so far absorbed everything Japan, Malaysia, Belgium and Brazil have trhown at them.

@Mark: ta for the kind words.

@David: love the Cadwell shot - and I sympathise completely about the shortage of trackside photo opportunities. Some UK circuits still give punters a fighting chance - Mallory, Cadwell, Goodwood and bits of Brands Hatch, for instance - and all my aforeposted Goodwood pix were taken from the ordinary spectator enclosures. The same is true of the following:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Simon Arron, 22 January 2011 - 14:17.


#106 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,227 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 22 January 2011 - 14:17

My late father hardly acknowledged the existence of any 'serious' cameras other than Leicas, his inevitable comment on any of my Nikons was "Yes, very clever, but..." He never parted with any, and probably had a dozen or more bodies when he died, all the way from a black-painted pre WW2 example with only two shutter speeds 1/25th and 1/50th, and no viewfinder, you had to guess distance and hope you'd set this more or less correctly when adjusting the lens, to a then new M4. He took two of them to Norway one year, and both failed when the fabric shutter blinds cracked and came apart due to the cold.

#107 Phil Rainford

Phil Rainford
  • Member

  • 5,290 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 22 January 2011 - 15:59

- and I sympathise completely about the shortage of trackside photo opportunities. Some UK circuits still give punters a fighting chance - Mallory, Cadwell, Goodwood and bits of Brands Hatch, for instance - and all my aforeposted Goodwood pix were taken from the ordinary spectator enclosures. The same is true of the following:



A few of mine taken this year as a fully paid up punter :)

Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image

And not a pair of wire cutters in sight  ;)


PAR


#108 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 16:06

My late father hardly acknowledged the existence of any 'serious' cameras other than Leicas, his inevitable comment on any of my Nikons was "Yes, very clever, but..." He never parted with any, and probably had a dozen or more bodies when he died, all the way from a black-painted pre WW2 example with only two shutter speeds 1/25th and 1/50th, and no viewfinder, you had to guess distance and hope you'd set this more or less correctly when adjusting the lens, to a then new M4. He took two of them to Norway one year, and both failed when the fabric shutter blinds cracked and came apart due to the cold.

It is possible to become blind to all makes of camera apart from the one you use - it does seem to affect Leica-owners more than most. My father never used anything other than Ihagee Exakta cameras, even though they were always breaking down and having to be expensively repaired. I offered to lend him a Nikon body and two or three lenses and was turned down flat, very sniffely, too!

#109 cyrilmac

cyrilmac
  • Member

  • 433 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 22 January 2011 - 16:18

I have always been mystified as to why the most simple camera's (ie. manual ones), are seen as the hardest to use.
I have often been handed some thing to photograph family moments that was described as simple to use only to find the exact opposite when I wanted to alter a setting for the benefit of the picture !

#110 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 17:04

I have always been mystified as to why the most simple camera's (ie. manual ones), are seen as the hardest to use.
I have often been handed some thing to photograph family moments that was described as simple to use only to find the exact opposite when I wanted to alter a setting for the benefit of the picture !

There is no doubt that the standard of 'happy snaps' has improved enormously since the introduction of digital point-and-shoot cameras, I used to have to force a look of interest and say "Mmm, nice!" to all sorts of out-of-focus, bleached-out or grainy green-grey rectangles of paper, now I am often genuinely impressed by holiday/BBQ/party pictures. However, try to overide the standard settings on an unfamiliar camera and you walk into a minefield. I thiink the problem with basic film cameras, when all you had to change was shutter speed, aperture and focus was that often the instructions were not as clear as they could have been, but mainly, most people cannot be bothered to learn how to do things properly. Nikon handbooks used to include, right at the front, advice on how to hold a camera, but I used to see, and still see, people holding SLR cameras in the most uncomfortable manner, and now, with digital cameras and their large rear screens, taking pictures on the hoof, just clicking away without breaking stride. I probably should have posted this in the Blood Pressure thread...

Edited by Tony Matthews, 22 January 2011 - 17:05.


#111 cyrilmac

cyrilmac
  • Member

  • 433 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 22 January 2011 - 17:59

There is no doubt that the standard of 'happy snaps' has improved enormously since the introduction of digital point-and-shoot cameras, I used to have to force a look of interest and say "Mmm, nice!" to all sorts of out-of-focus, bleached-out or grainy green-grey rectangles of paper, now I am often genuinely impressed by holiday/BBQ/party pictures. However, try to overide the standard settings on an unfamiliar camera and you walk into a minefield. I thiink the problem with basic film cameras, when all you had to change was shutter speed, aperture and focus was that often the instructions were not as clear as they could have been, but mainly, most people cannot be bothered to learn how to do things properly. Nikon handbooks used to include, right at the front, advice on how to hold a camera, but I used to see, and still see, people holding SLR cameras in the most uncomfortable manner, and now, with digital cameras and their large rear screens, taking pictures on the hoof, just clicking away without breaking stride. I probably should have posted this in the Blood Pressure thread...


No,no - you are right. Having started out with an Instamatic , the first point and shoot I think , and then shooting for money - I know what you mean when the "Well what do think ...?"
question is asked.


#112 David Lawson

David Lawson
  • Member

  • 869 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 22 January 2011 - 18:22

@David: love the Cadwell shot - and I sympathise completely about the shortage of trackside photo opportunities. Some UK circuits still give punters a fighting chance - Mallory, Cadwell, Goodwood and bits of Brands Hatch, for instance - and all my aforeposted Goodwood pix were taken from the ordinary spectator enclosures. The same is true of the following:


Simon - I agree that the tracks you mention still give the general admission spectators half a chance and at Goodwood in particular it is hard not to take a half decent photo wherever you point your camera.

A couple of mine from the Revival in 2005

Posted Image



Posted Image

Talking of Victor Blackman above led me to dig out my copy of "My Way with a Camera" which I had long forgotten that I had. I've spent a pleasant half an hour browsing through it again and had forgotten just how much there was about motor racing photography in it. I strongly recommend anyone to try and find a copy of it.

David

#113 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,132 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 18:22

My late father hardly acknowledged the existence of any 'serious' cameras other than Leicas, his inevitable comment on any of my Nikons was "Yes, very clever, but..." He never parted with any, and probably had a dozen or more bodies when he died, all the way from a black-painted pre WW2 example with only two shutter speeds 1/25th and 1/50th, and no viewfinder, you had to guess distance and hope you'd set this more or less correctly when adjusting the lens, to a then new M4. He took two of them to Norway one year, and both failed when the fabric shutter blinds cracked and came apart due to the cold.


I think (film) Leica Ms were routinely tested down to -20C by the factory (not sure about their digital successors) - they advised you to have them 'winterised' with thinner lubricants if you were planning a lot of Arctic or Antarctic photography. My old M2 seemed perfectly happy one particularly cold Christmas in Prague with the temperature regularly down to -28C or so (visible frost sparkling in the air - even the locals thought it was a bit excessive), though my M6 TTL demanded fresh replacement batteries for its metering when we went to a much warmer Tallinn (mechanical bits fine though).

The only time I've had shutter blind problems was with a screw Leica that hadn't been 'exercised' enough - they do like to have their shutter clicked every couple of months, to keep them healthy. Don't know of any pre-war ones with just two shutter speeds though. Not to say there aren't any - just that I haven't heard of them.

#114 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,227 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 22 January 2011 - 19:21

The only time I've had shutter blind problems was with a screw Leica that hadn't been 'exercised' enough - they do like to have their shutter clicked every couple of months, to keep them healthy. Don't know of any pre-war ones with just two shutter speeds though. Not to say there aren't any - just that I haven't heard of them.


I'm sure you're right with all that, Dad didn't do a great deal of photography in later years, and lack of use and thickened lubrication sound like the most probable cause. From memory, I think that the two cameras that failed were his favourite a 3G, and an M2 or M4, this happened at least 30 years ago, and while temperatures were low, they weren't as low as those that you describe.

The very first Leica came out in 1925, and I think that the oldest one Dad owned was only a few years later than that. Not sure if it had a model name back then, but I think that it was several years later, some time in the early 1930s before any Leica had a viewfinder/rangefinder, or more than two shutter speeds. We weren't a close family in later years, I wasn't bequeathed any of his Leicas, or anything else come to that, so I've no idea where they all went. I had an awful lot of Leica folklore foisted on me as a child though, stories like how the Leitz Hecktor (which I may have spelled wrongly) lens was named after Leica inventor Oskar Barnack's dog.

#115 elansprint72

elansprint72
  • Member

  • 3,387 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 20:55

I'm sure you're right with all that, Dad didn't do a great deal of photography in later years, and lack of use and thickened lubrication sound like the most probable cause. From memory, I think that the two cameras that failed were his favourite a 3G, and an M2 or M4, this happened at least 30 years ago, and while temperatures were low, they weren't as low as those that you describe.

The very first Leica came out in 1925, and I think that the oldest one Dad owned was only a few years later than that. Not sure if it had a model name back then, but I think that it was several years later, some time in the early 1930s before any Leica had a viewfinder/rangefinder, or more than two shutter speeds. We weren't a close family in later years, I wasn't bequeathed any of his Leicas, or anything else come to that, so I've no idea where they all went. I had an awful lot of Leica folklore foisted on me as a child though, stories like how the Leitz Hecktor (which I may have spelled wrongly) lens was named after Leica inventor Oskar Barnack's dog.


The early Leicas, as you describe, have retrospectively become know as Barnacks, after Oscar Barnack, the designer. I've only recently left (after 5 years membership) the Leica forum. The reliability, which was once taken for granted, has all but disappeared, the M8 digital rangefinder proved to be under-developed and was a disaster in terms of build and reliability, it could not record black surfaces and IR filters were the only solution which could be offered. The current M9 also has issues with dozens of units being DoA out of the box, screens cracking, sensor faults, etc. Lenses frequently have focus issues, out of the box, and have to go back to Solms for weeks for adjustment. These items cost thousands of dollars, incidentally!
The owners of R series SLRs have been abandoned, no further bodies are planned and lenses cannot be used on M series rangefinders. Altogether a rather sorry picture.
I use a Digilux 2, which has a fabulous fixed-mount zoom lens of 28-90mm equiv; although it is only 5mP and has a small sensor, the quality of the glass ensures fabulous clarity but only at 100 ISO, above which noise is evident. Of course a certain section of the old farts shouted "not a real Leica" as they were assembled by Panasonic- perhaps not a bad thing, considering the lamentable current QC (or lack of) at Leica.
If anyone wants to give me an old M2 or an M4 which might be gathering dust in some cupboard, I would be happy to help out. :)

Edited by elansprint72, 22 January 2011 - 22:46.


#116 elansprint72

elansprint72
  • Member

  • 3,387 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 20:58

Some lovely photos chaps! :)

I don't recall having seen a primary chain cover on a racing Norton before- new elf'n'safety regs?  ;)

#117 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 22 January 2011 - 21:45

the Revival in 2005


Posted Image

Terrific! What a change from a single car taken with a long telephoto, the Front-3/4 so beloved by magazines. Here you have the complete field plus setting - a photograph to look at over and over...

#118 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,561 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 22 January 2011 - 21:49

There is no doubt that the standard of 'happy snaps' has improved enormously since the introduction of digital point-and-shoot cameras, I used to have to force a look of interest and say "Mmm, nice!" to all sorts of out-of-focus, bleached-out or grainy green-grey rectangles of paper, now I am often genuinely impressed by holiday/BBQ/party pictures. However, try to overide the standard settings on an unfamiliar camera and you walk into a minefield. I thiink the problem with basic film cameras, when all you had to change was shutter speed, aperture and focus was that often the instructions were not as clear as they could have been, but mainly, most people cannot be bothered to learn how to do things properly. Nikon handbooks used to include, right at the front, advice on how to hold a camera, but I used to see, and still see, people holding SLR cameras in the most uncomfortable manner, and now, with digital cameras and their large rear screens, taking pictures on the hoof, just clicking away without breaking stride. I probably should have posted this in the Blood Pressure thread...


You're just too good to be true... :drunk:

Posted Image


David, could I ask a very simple question? Do you paint (pictures that is - not walls and such like)? That picture is fantastic.

Edited by MCS, 22 January 2011 - 21:52.


#119 WDH74

WDH74
  • Member

  • 1,145 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 22 January 2011 - 22:43

I hesitate to contribute to this thread if it has to be arty farty pictures only.


I think the general idea was for stuff that's a little bit outside the norm. As someone else stated, something different from the standard telephoto shot of a car with a little blur to the background, or a front three quarters view with the wheels turned to the right. I'm reminded of rail photography (which I dabble in as well)-I'll go to a rail forum, and all the photos are exactly the same. Front, three quarter "wedge" shots of the leading locomotives, maybe a going-away shot of the second engine, and maybe an interesting rail car. They look nice, but the only differences are the backgrounds and the colors of the locomotives-not much variety!

By the by I like that shot of Hunt-it has a very vintage look to it.



I have always been mystified as to why the most simple camera's (ie. manual ones), are seen as the hardest to use.
I have often been handed some thing to photograph family moments that was described as simple to use only to find the exact opposite when I wanted to alter a setting for the benefit of the picture !


I hate being handed a point and shoot digital camera and being told to take a picture. It takes me three times as long because they are slow to focus and I can't figure out how to zoom it in. Invariably the person who handed me the camera will say something like "I thought you were good at this?".

Having said that, I don't often go all manual on my digital SLR-I rather like the aperture and shutter speed modes, as it simplifies things just enough for me to be able to concentrate on my shot rather than looking at the light meter. This attitude often makes photographers of a certain crusty demeanor shake their Nikon F's angrily at me and tell me to get off the lawn! (I kid. Sort of)

-WDH


Advertisement

#120 Robin Fairservice

Robin Fairservice
  • Member

  • 498 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:36

Talking about photographing railway trains, does any one remember Dr. Ransom Wallis from the 1950's and 1960's? He lived in Herne Bay, and owned two Jowett Javelins, one after the other and thought the world of them, which is why I own one now. I was a friend of his eldest daughter at College, and she told me lots about him and his cars.

#121 Terry Walker

Terry Walker
  • Member

  • 2,720 posts
  • Joined: July 05

Posted 23 January 2011 - 05:33

Ihagee Exacta?

My first 35 mm camera! Varex IIb. I even found a 135 mm lens for it. Eventually the shutter went belly up, and the camera technicians told me it would cost more to fix than a new camera, so I bought a new camera. I still have most of my cameras back to my first box brownie, although I sold my medium format stuff some years ago, as well as my 4 x 5 view cameras.

Posted Image

Edited by Terry Walker, 23 January 2011 - 05:33.


#122 Simon Arron

Simon Arron
  • Member

  • 2,260 posts
  • Joined: November 06

Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:31

@David Lawson: David, that Goodwood Revival start shot from 2005 is - as others have mentioned - absolutely fabulous.



#123 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,227 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 23 January 2011 - 09:52

I hate being handed a point and shoot digital camera and being told to take a picture. It takes me three times as long because they are slow to focus and I can't figure out how to zoom it in. Invariably the person who handed me the camera will say something like "I thought you were good at this?".


How true!


#124 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,132 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:15

How true!


Especially when they don't have a proper viewfinder but instead expect to be held at arm's length to compose the pic via a dimly lit screen in bright sunshine. Really love those!


#125 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,132 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:21

Ihagee Exacta?

My first 35 mm camera! Varex IIb. I even found a 135 mm lens for it. Eventually the shutter went belly up, and the camera technicians told me it would cost more to fix than a new camera, so I bought a new camera. I still have most of my cameras back to my first box brownie, although I sold my medium format stuff some years ago, as well as my 4 x 5 view cameras.

Posted Image


Ah, the Varex IIb - same as Mrs Odseybod's first serious camera. Lovely optics but a little challenged in the mechanical department (repaired/overhauled once by the man at R.G. Lewis, who said he'd prefer not to see it again, thank you very much). Having to adjust to a left-hand shutter release and wind-on was also a bit of a culture shock when I was allowed to use it. But very ingenious - liked the way each lens came with its own shutter-button, which handled the aperture closing for each exposure.

#126 David Lawson

David Lawson
  • Member

  • 869 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 23 January 2011 - 11:53

David, could I ask a very simple question? Do you paint (pictures that is - not walls and such like)? That picture is fantastic.


Thank you for the kind comments about my pictures, as I always say they are the result of 45 years of all my mistakes.

I come from an artistic family but I haven't picked up a brush since my school days and I was c**p then but without sounding conceited I do have a natural awareness of composure. I try to avoid the common error that you see of the photograph where the person has centralised the car in the frame because they are worried about "missing" the car and as a result pay no attention to anything else.

On the subject of sticking blinds in cameras, my mid 1970s Olympus OM1 started to stick when it was about 10 years old and it cost quite a bit to repair.

David

#127 cyrilmac

cyrilmac
  • Member

  • 433 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:20

Even the most hard bitten motorsports photographers can easily be distracted :

Posted Image

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

I recall being sent to Oulton to cover a race - cannot remember which one - and returning with only the podium shot after being engaged in conversation by one of my hero's DSJ ! in fact if Yvonne Boothroyd had not said something I would have missed that shot as well.

#128 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:43

I try to avoid the common error that you see of the photograph where the person has centralised the car in the frame because they are worried about "missing" the car and as a result pay no attention to anything else.

Common in all types of photography, not least prtraiture, especially on holiday. Friends and relatives cut off at the mid-thigh, faces bang in the middle, acres of blue sky above... If you gently explain that the viewfinder is the picture, and why not get the heads nearer the top, you might get one like that, then a return to normal.

#129 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,227 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:58

Common in all types of photography, not least prtraiture, especially on holiday. Friends and relatives cut off at the mid-thigh, faces bang in the middle, acres of blue sky above... If you gently explain that the viewfinder is the picture, and why not get the heads nearer the top, you might get one like that, then a return to normal.


Just about the most common error that non-expert photographers make, they look through a viewfinder or at the LCD panel, and only see the item(s) that they're concentrating on, peoples' faces for example, not the overall picture. My wife is no mean artist when she has a pencil or brush in her hand, but suffers badly from this fault, I've lost count of the number of pics she's taken of me with my feet missing, or with a dustbin or similar item, in frame but completely un-noticed by her at my side.


#130 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,561 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 23 January 2011 - 13:04

Especially when they don't have a proper viewfinder but instead expect to be held at arm's length to compose the pic via a dimly lit screen in bright sunshine. Really love those!


Oh, don't get me started on that one. My eldest daughter has now decided that she wants a compact digital camera with a viewfinder - perfectly understandable of course.

But try finding one! Goodness me. There are a few Canon Ixus models still with the facility but the viewfinder is absolutely minuscule. And no, before you ask, she doesn't want a Digital SLR (yet!) - it needs to fit in her handbag...

#131 Option1

Option1
  • Member

  • 13,336 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 23 January 2011 - 15:00

Even the most hard bitten motorsports photographers can easily be distracted :

Posted Image

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

I recall being sent to Oulton to cover a race - cannot remember which one - and returning with only the podium shot after being engaged in conversation by one of my hero's DSJ ! in fact if Yvonne Boothroyd had not said something I would have missed that shot as well.

Well you do have to take the time to smell the flowers:

Posted Image

From the RACE Round 6 motorcycle races at Shannonville. :)

Neil

#132 cyrilmac

cyrilmac
  • Member

  • 433 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 23 January 2011 - 15:22

Well you do have to take the time to smell the flowers:

Posted Image

From the RACE Round 6 motorcycle races at Shannonville. :)

Neil


Nice ! :up:


#133 alansart

alansart
  • Member

  • 4,023 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 23 January 2011 - 17:01

This has been the most enjoyable thread for ages, even though I have spent far to long looking at great the work of photographers, including many that I've never heard of :))

I'll add my contribution from my purely amateur portfolio.

In the 70's I brought a cheap Miranda with an even cheaper 150mm lens. As I marshalled at most meetings I went to, I didn't take that many photos and unfortunately most were lost when my mother decided to have a clear out after I left home. I thought some were quite good at the time but if I ever found them again, they would probably look crap.

In the early 80's I needed a camera for work and brought a screw thread Pentax SP1000 from a 2nd hand Camera Shop on Cheetham Hill Road in Manchester. It came in it's original box along with the receipt when it was first brought in 1972. I added a cheap Sunagor 300m zoom for my racing stuff as it was all I could afford. It actually wasn't that bad as long as there was enough light, but had it's limitations.


This was taken at Mosport Park in 1985. There was a spot where spectators could view through a gap in the barriers. You get quite low down and the marshals stood far enough apart so that we could shoot between them. There were 6 or 7 of us all wanting the same position so we took it in turns. All very friendly.

Posted Image


I quite like this. FF2000 Swifts lined up.

Posted Image


This at the Ostcurve Chicane at Hockenheim. I found a spot where the debris fencing was damaged, so there just enough space to shoot through the gap.

Posted Image


Hockenheim again. I wish I had the courage to drop the shutter speed a bit.

Posted Image


Close Formula Ford racing.

Posted Image


All I had left near the end of a Formula Ford Festival was a 100ASA colour film. The light had gone but I quite liked this one. Nothings really in focus but it has a sense of speed.

Posted Image


A couple of years ago I again needed a camera for work and picked up an Olympus E500 in Florida for about half the price in the UK. Perfect for work but again it does struggle a bit with bad light. Lenses are a bit limited but I picked up a 40-150 zoom on Ebay for £90 and I actually quite like it.

I'm happier to reduce the shutter speeds as I'm not wasting film any more.

Posted Image

Posted Image


The Olympus struggles with light and for some reason I can't find how to raise the ISO above 400, but it didn't do too bad at a wet Anglesey the other year, although the lens seems to throw up a few spots.

Posted Image


The settings were totally wrong when I took this but I like the 60's feel of the colours even though there's a modern van and wheelie bins at the top. I just wish I could remember what the camera settings were!!

Posted Image

Edited by alansart, 23 January 2011 - 18:02.


#134 RShaw

RShaw
  • Member

  • 132 posts
  • Joined: February 09

Posted 23 January 2011 - 17:11

I try to avoid the common error that you see of the photograph where the person has centralised the car in the frame because they are worried about "missing" the car and as a result pay no attention to anything else.


Ansel Adams, the master of pre-visualization, i.e., knowing what the finished photo will look like before taking the picture, had a term for darkroom correction of his (presumably) rare photo-taking mistakes. He called it "re-visualization".

I have much sympathy for the poor photographer whose track photos have the subject smack in the middle of the frame, where the focus grid is doubtless located, having made the same "mistake" myself countless times. That is where "re-visualization" comes into play, a process made infinately easier today with editing software.

Edited by RShaw, 23 January 2011 - 17:13.


#135 Phil Rainford

Phil Rainford
  • Member

  • 5,290 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 23 January 2011 - 17:26

This has been the most enjoyable thread for ages, even though I have spent far to long looking at great the work of photographers, including many that I've never heard of :))

All I had left near the end of a Formula Ford Festival was a 100ASA colour film. The light had gone but I quite liked this one. Nothings really in focus but it has a sense of speed.

Posted Image


Same idea.......dusk at Le Mans

Posted Image

PAR


#136 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 9,612 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 23 January 2011 - 18:26

[quote name='RShaw' date='Jan 23 2011, 10:11' post='4798296']
Ansel Adams, the master of pre-visualization, i.e., knowing what the finished photo will look like before taking the picture, had a term for darkroom correction of his (presumably) rare photo-taking mistakes. He called it "re-visualization".

You've really hit a nerve here.... as a professional shooter for the past few decades, to me the "pre-visualization" factor in photography was what separated the pros from the amateurs. In the past, the pro could see as if they WERE the film, and proper exposure on reversal film was paramount. Without it, there was nothing. The amateurs had to "hope it would turn out" until their dues were rightfully paid, the essence of being worthy in any craft (at least, before technology converted, or perverted, yet another art into a science). This was the defining line, and why experience and diligence — and lots of monies in film and processing — were required to become a professional. And why those who followed that path deserved their every success.

Now that information is instantly-displayed on a digital monitor, and shooting is essentially free.

This is the greatest time in history to be an amateur, and the maybe worst time to be a professional. God help my industry.

#137 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,227 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 23 January 2011 - 18:34

God help my industry.


You make a perfectly fair point, but I'll bet that's pretty much what hansom cab and stagecoach makers used to say, the world moves on.

#138 alansart

alansart
  • Member

  • 4,023 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 23 January 2011 - 18:38

You make a perfectly fair point, but I'll bet that's pretty much what hansom cab and stagecoach makers used to say, the world moves on.


I'm an Illustrator, trained in the old ways of pencil, paint and airbrush but managed fairly early on to transfer to Apple Mac's to attempt to make a living. It ain't bloody easy :(

Edited by alansart, 23 January 2011 - 18:39.


#139 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 9,612 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 23 January 2011 - 18:45

I'm an Illustrator, trained in the old ways of pencil, paint and airbrush but managed fairly early on to transfer to Apple Mac's to attempt to make a living. It ain't bloody easy :(


I've used Illustrator since 1988. It still takes great artistic talent to properly use that app, it's merely a different tool.... and it doesn't show you finished results before you do the work.

And Kayemod.... what do you do for a living? Ever had a computer do it for you? The stagecoach analogy took decades to change the world, not a few years.

Advertisement

#140 alansart

alansart
  • Member

  • 4,023 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 23 January 2011 - 18:50

I've used Illustrator since 1988. It still takes great artistic talent to properly use that app, it's merely a different tool.... and it doesn't show you finished results before you do the work.


Yes it does, but unfortunately clients (well mine anyway) want to pay sod all for it.




#141 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 9,612 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:04

Yes it does, but unfortunately clients (well mine anyway) want to pay sod all for it.


That is correct, and I sincerely wish you the best.

One example.... I read posts here all the time asking for photos. I have yet to read an offer of payment. My life's work has gone from thousands per use, to clip art.... and all that for ten years of scanning to reinvent what used to be ready for sale.

Alansart.... I'll bet you didn't become an artist to end up a scientist? That said, I hope for you it still beats alternative careers, they haven't built a computer to think and create.... yet.

Best to You, and all artists.

#142 alansart

alansart
  • Member

  • 4,023 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:10

That is correct, and I sincerely wish you the best.

One example.... I read posts here all the time asking for photos. I have yet to read an offer of payment. My life's work has gone from thousands per use, to clip art.... and all that for ten years of scanning to reinvent what used to be ready for sale.

Alansart.... I'll bet you didn't become an artist to end up a scientist? That said, I hope for you it still beats alternative careers, they haven't built a computer to think and create.... yet.

Best to You, and all artists.


Have you looked at the Cutaway Artists thread. There a few legends on there who saw the writing on the wall when perhaps I should have done. The world is a different place from 20 years ago ):

Fortunately I'm lucky enough to be married to a Scientist who's paying most of the bills :kiss:.

Edited by alansart, 23 January 2011 - 19:11.


#143 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 9,612 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:27

Have you looked at the Cutaway Artists thread. There a few legends on there who saw the writing on the wall when perhaps I should have done. The world is a different place from 20 years ago ):

Fortunately I'm lucky enough to be married to a Scientist who's paying most of the bills :kiss:.


No disrespect to scientists intended, just that I didn't choose to be one. Good thing you have one!

#144 bradbury west

bradbury west
  • Member

  • 4,599 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:41

acres of blue sky above...


But if you are looking for a sky picture, I took these with a point and shoot over the fields tonight. The evening was in fact much lighter, but I always keep the camera ,Panasonic Lumis DMC.TZ3, on the i for idiot setting, although it has a couple of dozen alternatives, far too clever for me.

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
I always like the sunrise and sunset, and out with the dog twice a day often gives me those windows.
Roger Lund

Note. I will delete them all later in such a pro environment

Edited by bradbury west, 23 January 2011 - 19:48.


#145 dwh43scale

dwh43scale
  • Member

  • 167 posts
  • Joined: December 08

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:43

There's nothing wrong with a good sunset !

#146 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,132 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:52

But if you are looking for a sky picture, I took these with a point and shoot over the fields tonight. The evening was in fact much lighter, but I always keep the camera ,Panasonic Lumis DMC.TZ3, on the i for idiot setting, although it has a couple of dozen alternatives, far too clever for me.


Must be some delighted shepherds in your area, Roger.

#147 The Oracle

The Oracle
  • Member

  • 104 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:53

I'll upload some pics when I can - nothing that can be classed as "nostagia" yet i'm afraid but would like a little feedback and advice from - what would appear to be - some very knowledgable persons (wow motorsports and photography i'm in heaven), been wathcing motorsports for ages but only about 10 years "live" so a very limited portfolio so far, used to use a Chinon cx (based on a Pentax body with m42? mount) fully manual SLR and progressed to a Nikon F65 and later F80 SLRs where I used Provia, Velvia and Kodachrome 64, and now own a Nikon D80 digital SLR my main lens in a 70-300 f4-5.4 lens but must upgrade as soon as funds allow, thinking a Sigma 70-200 f2.8 or the 100-300 f4.

I'll sort my archive and post a selection soon for some constructive critisism!

#148 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 9,612 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:00

These are very nice images. I live for great light like this. I wasn't slamming amateur photographers at all.... enjoy it, and the benefits the new wave brings to your work.

To clarify.... my comments were about technology destroying art industries. As a hands-on artist himself, I believe Ansel would share my thoughts (I'm not comparing myself to him), as do almost all of my nature photographer brethren.

Apologies if misinterpreted.

#149 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:00

Must be some delighted shepherds in your area, Roger.

Only if the dog is on a leash!

#150 bradbury west

bradbury west
  • Member

  • 4,599 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:21

Only if the dog is on a leash!


As a properly trained working-stock Springer she does not bother about sheep or cattle
RL