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Bahrain GP 2011-2012 and Bahrain public unrest (merged)


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#3601 MickStephenson

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 09:45

Anyone know of any sponsors asking to be taken off the cars during the GP?

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#3602 as65p

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 11:51

i agree and Bernie was right when he said that before the GP weekend, during it and after it the situation in the country will probably be as it is now.....but there are two very important aspects to this which make the current decision to race very shaky - the first is obviously that the race supports the rulers of the nation who are bankrolling the event (and of course Bernie and the FOM are happy to take their cut) and the second is that the side in favour of the race favour their status quo whereas the side against the race are requesting greater democracy and human rights for the whole of the population, not just a select few elite.....the race happening supports that ruling elite by association so i'm afraid (in my very humble opinion) there is a shared guilt that a call for human rights changes by a significant portion of a population is being ignored.....i realise that this argument can equally be applied to China and Russia and Malaysia and several other countries on the calendar, but this situation in Bahrain is 'live' and the sport is encouraging a standoff between the authorities and the protestors because we know they're going to be there and there will be flashpoints....at the moment we seem to be hoping (if that is the right word) that these flashpoints will be out of sight and out of earshot while the grand prix takes place.....for me, that is a deeply unacceptable position.


I admit I don't know that much about the actual situation in Bahrain. I have, however, my general resevations about those bold claims of fighting for freedom and democracy and human rights. That's all very easy to use and abuse for a surpressed party, but how often do such fights simply result in a different party becoming the rulers and thereafter behave very similar or even worse than the people they replaced, especially in that region of the world? As I understand this may be as much a battle of religions (shiites vs. sunites) as anything else, which doesn't excatly help to convince me of the noble causes being fought for.

One can, as you seem to, hold a position of high moral standards and deem sporting events in countries who abuse human rights as unacceptable. But I don't see how you can reserve that position for Bahrain only. Many have rightfully pointed out that in other countries on the F1 calendar the situation is comparable or worse.

#3603 britishtrident

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 12:43

If this forum was a car I would re-check the corner weights and alignment because it is pulling to the extreme right.

Edited by britishtrident, 14 April 2012 - 17:06.


#3604 metz

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 12:57

That's all very easy to use and abuse for a surpressed party, but how often do such fights simply result in a different party becoming the rulers and thereafter behave very similar or even worse than the people they replaced,

Are you suggesting that America be ruled by the British monarchy?
Are you further suggesting that the Chinese revolution was not a success for the people?
Tell me again what we are doing in Afghanistan.

Never in the history of F1 have we seen such direct protests against the running of a GP.
Bernie and many here have not realized that the protests are agains the GP, not just the monarchy.

#3605 Octavian

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 13:30

As alot of others have said, for most people, it's not about human rights issues, it's about safety.


Nah, it's not. If it was about safety we'd never see racing in Sao Paulo where deadly gun battles between the police and gangs are a daily occurrence and where entire tourist buses get held up by armed robbers etc.
This is about politics now.

#3606 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 13:54

Exactly. And because of FIA rules the race should not go ahead. It's been hijacked for political agends and does nothing but hurt F1.

#3607 Risil

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 14:02

It's also worth pointing out that high crime rates are one thing, Formula One being specifically targeted by political groups is another. Arguing anything else is a serious misuse of statistics.

Formula One is not going to get caught up in rioting or violent crackdowns, but there are other dangers which don't exist in London or Sao Paulo.

Edited by Risil, 14 April 2012 - 14:03.


#3608 PretentiousBread

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 18:09

Anyone see Bernie's response on the F1 show to being asked if he'll be in Bahrain? What a sodding wanker, nothing endearing about that old ****. Really can't stand that amoral bastard.

#3609 puxanando

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 18:15

Bahrain Mirror has been informed from private sources in Bahrain International Circuit which hosts yearly the Grand Prix, that today morning between 6 and 6:30 a home-made explosive device had been dismantled. The explosive device was implanted in the vicinity of the race circuit. Sources from outside the circuit which is located in Sukhair area said the power of the explosive material exceeded that of the device that had exploded in Al-Ekr Village last Monday and injured seven policemen, three of them were inured severely, according to Ministry of Interior declaration.

Our sources confirmed the presence of intelligence, public security, and army members in the vicinity of the circuit today. The news was hushed, while voices calling to boycott the motor race in Bahrain are getting louder.


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#3610 Watkins74

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 18:19

^
I'll wait until someone other than the Bahrain Mirror reports it.

#3611 puxanando

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 18:27

Teenager protester in intensive care as Bahrain Grand Prix gets green light
A teenage mourner shot by police in Bahrain was in intensive care on Saturday as Formula One bosses said next week's Grand Prix will proceed as planned.


WEB>>>

#3612 wrighty

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 18:27

I admit I don't know that much about the actual situation in Bahrain. I have, however, my general resevations about those bold claims of fighting for freedom and democracy and human rights. That's all very easy to use and abuse for a surpressed party, but how often do such fights simply result in a different party becoming the rulers and thereafter behave very similar or even worse than the people they replaced, especially in that region of the world? As I understand this may be as much a battle of religions (shiites vs. sunites) as anything else, which doesn't excatly help to convince me of the noble causes being fought for.

One can, as you seem to, hold a position of high moral standards and deem sporting events in countries who abuse human rights as unacceptable. But I don't see how you can reserve that position for Bahrain only. Many have rightfully pointed out that in other countries on the F1 calendar the situation is comparable or worse.


i'll try to explain why i feel this race is so tainted....as we have already discussed, Bahrain is by no means the only country on the calendar *with human rights issues* but again i can only reiterate the difference i see as so significant.....none of the other scheduled events on the calendar have one side of the fighting (it's fair to refer to it in that way) saying 'we are asking you not to attend this race....we are protesting in your name'....they are representing F1's corporate logo with a sub-machine gun for Christ's sake....they are not asking for ruling power, they are just asking for some basic human rights with regard to how their rulers are treating a sector of their own population.....Medicins Sans Frontiers, Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International all support their case and yet the F1 administrators feel that they are better off ignoring this problem, doing a race, taking the money and walking away on the premise that 'we won't change anything'? Are you sure? Does Bernie and the FOM shareholders and the FIA and the teams and the teams sponsors feel that they will enhance their public image by making this race happen? Really?


(edited to add the *addition for grammar*)

Edited by wrighty, 14 April 2012 - 18:28.


#3613 britishtrident

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 20:21

For me the telling statements have been by Médecins Sans Frontières any national goverment that puts secret policemen into hospital A&Es and doctors surgeries shouldn't be allowed to participate in international sport.

#3614 Nonesuch

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 20:37

Tell me again what we are doing in Afghanistan.

Good question. Not even Gen. John Allen, chief of the international forces in Afghanistan, seems to have a compelling answer.

Anyone know of any sponsors asking to be taken off the cars during the GP?

Interesting point! I haven't heard of anything, though.

#3615 as65p

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 20:57

i'll try to explain why i feel this race is so tainted....as we have already discussed, Bahrain is by no means the only country on the calendar *with human rights issues* but again i can only reiterate the difference i see as so significant.....none of the other scheduled events on the calendar have one side of the fighting (it's fair to refer to it in that way) saying 'we are asking you not to attend this race....we are protesting in your name'....they are representing F1's corporate logo with a sub-machine gun for Christ's sake....they are not asking for ruling power, they are just asking for some basic human rights with regard to how their rulers are treating a sector of their own population.....Medicins Sans Frontiers, Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International all support their case and yet the F1 administrators feel that they are better off ignoring this problem, doing a race, taking the money and walking away on the premise that 'we won't change anything'? Are you sure? Does Bernie and the FOM shareholders and the FIA and the teams and the teams sponsors feel that they will enhance their public image by making this race happen? Really?


(edited to add the *addition for grammar*)


Well, the point remains that there is no logical connection between Bahrain politics and motor racing. On it's own, cars circulating a track won't help or hurt either side.

Then again, obviously the current situation has dragged F1 into an otherwise completely unrelated political conflict. Motor racing is simply abused, and I dare say mainly by the protestors. The ruling family of Bahrain might be autocratic and suppressive to their people, but I highly doubt the idea of a GP was born to help their stranglehold of the country. The protestors, OTOH, seemingly just hijacked the event with the most international publicity and abuse it for their purpose. Even if that purpose itself is mostly or even completely justified, that remains an abuse from F1's POV.

#3616 finignig

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:01

So am back to the Island.. sigh.. here's a quick update:

1- Body of the camera man killed last week while filming a crackdown on a village was finally buried after the government modified his death certificate to include "gunshot wound", of course clashes followed the funeral with several injuries and bird shotguns are in use again since last weekend. (The victim Ahmed Ismail been a volunteer at the track for F1 past few years and this year as well which fueled a lot more anti-f1 sentiment).

2- There has been mass arrests lately, many of them are ones that have been released the past few months, I know 3 personally who are under 18 years old and arrested in dawn raids last night.

3- The whole "terrorism" story of things and home-made bombs is being disputed by many, Everyone is convinced that it was either a gas cylinder that blew up or the whole thing is fabricated by the government, Why you might ask, It's due to the hardliner's faction of the royal family not wanting it (the GP) to take place in the first place just to give the finger to the Crowne Prince. They already destroyed his work in the Economic Development Board, they gate crashed Mumtalakat which owns the circuit and Mclaren etc, and are currently screwing up the national airlines Gulf Air before selling it or merging it on the cheap with Bahrain Airlines which is owned by the Prime minister.

4- Most talk however is about videos released of rioters attacking and looting Shiaa businesses under the protection and help of the police force.. Showing just how absurd this government, Video link and nice summary found here http://marcowenjones...ket-in-bahrain/ alongside many other great posts that I highly recommend.

Edited by finignig, 15 April 2012 - 01:03.


#3617 scheivlak

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:06

Even if that purpose itself is mostly or even completely justified, that remains an abuse from F1's POV.

I think the future and the human rights of the people of Bahrain are just a bit more important than F1 - which can do very well without this GP.

#3618 BinaryDad

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:06

Well, the point remains that there is no logical connection between Bahrain politics and motor racing. On it's own, cars circulating a track won't help or hurt either side.



I completely agree with this. Perhaps we should try and look at it from another angle...having the F1 circus in town, means a legitimate reason to have an awful lot of foreign journalists on the ground, looking around and poking their nose about. Lots of opportunities to see what's going on in Bahrain, which normal journalists wouldn't have, given the press restrictions in place.



#3619 Red17

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:13

I completely agree with this. Perhaps we should try and look at it from another angle...having the F1 circus in town, means a legitimate reason to have an awful lot of foreign journalists on the ground, looking around and poking their nose about. Lots of opportunities to see what's going on in Bahrain, which normal journalists wouldn't have, given the press restrictions in place.

Except that it doesnt look like there will be much press.

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#3620 olliek88

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:13

Well, the point remains that there is no logical connection between Bahrain politics and motor racing. On it's own, cars circulating a track won't help or hurt either side.

Then again, obviously the current situation has dragged F1 into an otherwise completely unrelated political conflict. Motor racing is simply abused, and I dare say mainly by the protestors. The ruling family of Bahrain might be autocratic and suppressive to their people, but I highly doubt the idea of a GP was born to help their stranglehold of the country. The protestors, OTOH, seemingly just hijacked the event with the most international publicity and abuse it for their purpose. Even if that purpose itself is mostly or even completely justified, that remains an abuse from F1's POV.


When the government in question funds the circuit that the teams race around and one of the teams on the grid i'd say theres a reasonable connection

#3621 as65p

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:44

When the government in question funds the circuit that the teams race around and one of the teams on the grid i'd say theres a reasonable connection


Still no relevant, as far as I can see. Sure, the government funds and supports F1, but how is that related to democracy and human rights under their leadership? Dou you think it would be a better place if the royal family had no interest in motor racing?

#3622 IceSkyrim

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 21:56

Oh dear... :rolleyes: What a diplomat

http://www.dailymail...-Whitmarsh.html

#3623 scheivlak

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 22:05

Still no relevant, as far as I can see. Sure, the government funds and supports F1, but how is that related to democracy and human rights under their leadership? Dou you think it would be a better place if the royal family had no interest in motor racing?

Maybe it makes some sense to look at the reasons why the race was cancelled in 2011. It was not cancelled by the FIA (though they were, interestingly, quite fast to say that they would have had the formal right to decide about that), not by Bernie and not by the teams.

It was cancelled by the organisers who gave purely - and in itself quite sane- political reasons for that: "our nation's priority is on overcoming tragedy, healing divisions and rediscovering the fabric that draws this country together; reminding the world of the very best that Bahrain is capable of as a nation once again united." http://www.autosport...rt.php/id/89598

I think the divisions are not yet healed (yes, I like understatements).

Edited by scheivlak, 14 April 2012 - 22:07.


#3624 flowerdew

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 22:33

Except that it doesnt look like there will be much press.


Which is primarily because of actions, threats and warnings from some of the more extreme protest groups. I don't understand it; if things are as bad on the ground as the protesters say, I would want foreign journalists in my country to show that to the world. I wouldn't be trying to steer them away. And I certainly wouldn't threaten - let alone engage in - violence against a major sporting event, because that's a surefire way to lose any goodwill you might have with the international community. (Though obviously there will always be a few outliers, as shown by a few eyebrow-raising posts in this thread.)

#3625 Slartibartfast

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 22:54

Well, the point remains that there is no logical connection between Bahrain politics and motor racing. On it's own, cars circulating a track won't help or hurt either side.

I'm not sure how cars circulating round a track sell cigarettes, bank accounts, mobile phones or anything else... but a lot of businesses put their money into F1 in the belief that they do. The Bahraini government is among them, so I think that makes a logical connection.

Then again, obviously the current situation has dragged F1 into an otherwise completely unrelated political conflict. Motor racing is simply abused, and I dare say mainly by the protestors. The ruling family of Bahrain might be autocratic and suppressive to their people, but I highly doubt the idea of a GP was born to help their stranglehold of the country. The protestors, OTOH, seemingly just hijacked the event with the most international publicity and abuse it for their purpose. Even if that purpose itself is mostly or even completely justified, that remains an abuse from F1's POV.

I don't think the protestors are funding the race or using the "UniF1ed" slogan, so I don't think the allegation that it is the protestors that are politicising the race is a wholly valid one. Unless you were using the term "protesters" as an ironic reference to the Al Khalifas, in which case you were being too subtle for me.

#3626 rhukkas

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:00

Oh dear... :rolleyes: What a diplomat

http://www.dailymail...-Whitmarsh.html


What he says isn't strictly untrue. Jenson had that incident a couple years ago. Also, McLaren is part-owned by Bahrain. I think we can safely assume they'll be getting special security.

#3627 Bartel

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:19

I think Formula 1 going to Bahrain paints a bad picture for the sport. But in saying that, I could be completely wrong, it seems odd to me, that if it were so bad, Formula 1 would be so careless and oblivious to it and just go anyway. I still think its a very touchy subject after Bernie's little outburst on Sky the other day, as much as its a done deal I'm still not so sure. If it does go ahead, they will revert back to the older shorter layout correct? (I hope so) I seem to remember them satating after the 2010 race the next one would go back to the old layout?

#3628 redbroccoli

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:20

I don't think the protestors are funding the race or using the "UniF1ed" slogan, so I don't think the allegation that it is the protestors that are politicising the race is a wholly valid one. Unless you were using the term "protesters" as an ironic reference to the Al Khalifas, in which case you were being too subtle for me.

Not necessarily. The protesters are also using F1 logo with machine gun so both sides are politicizing the race.

#3629 Slartibartfast

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:31

Not necessarily. The protesters are also using F1 logo with machine gun so both sides are politicizing the race.

If one side politicises the race, then it it politicised.
One side has attempted to use the race to, in effect, say "Look, there is nothing wrong, the people love us and we are all one happy family."* I think the other side has the right to reply without being accused of being equally at fault in politicising what should be an apolitical event.






*Possible hyperbole acknowledged.

#3630 as65p

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:33

I'm not sure how cars circulating round a track sell cigarettes, bank accounts, mobile phones or anything else... but a lot of businesses put their money into F1 in the belief that they do. The Bahraini government is among them, so I think that makes a logical connection.


Oh, you are sure. I'm quite sure of that, for sure! :)

There is still no connection between F1 and a non-democratically governed country. This is simple yet another case of one party just hijacking the most public event to push their case. The case itself may be just or not, but it remains a dirty tactic to use a totally unrelated event for ones purposes. There are certainly major issues to adress in Bahrains society, yet the current prime message to the world is "we don't want motor racing". I could conclude if that's their main problem, life can't be too bad otherwise.

I don't think the protestors are funding the race or using the "UniF1ed" slogan, so I don't think the allegation that it is the protestors that are politicising the race is a wholly valid one. Unless you were using the term "protesters" as an ironic reference to the Al Khalifas, in which case you were being too subtle for me.


Again, there's no automatic connection between funding and politising. Bahrains ruling people might be rotten to the bone, but there's no way they invited F1 to their country to suppress their local opposition even more, or strengthen their leadership. The oppositions reasons for protesting F1 are very clear OTOH - unless you think they are truly concerned about racing cars polluting their air.

At last, I would be really curious to learn in what way not having a F1 race would help the opposition in Bahrain. No race in 2011 didn't seem to help matters all that much.

#3631 Slartibartfast

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:44

Oh, you are sure. I'm quite sure of that, for sure! :)

There is still no connection between F1 and a non-democratically governed country. This is simple yet another case of one party just hijacking the most public event to push their case. The case itself may be just or not, but it remains a dirty tactic to use a totally unrelated event for ones purposes. There are certainly major issues to adress in Bahrains society, yet the current prime message to the world is "we don't want motor racing". I could conclude if that's their main problem, life can't be too bad otherwise.



Again, there's no automatic connection between funding and politising. Bahrains ruling people might be rotten to the bone, but there's no way they invited F1 to their country to suppress their local opposition even more, or strengthen their leadership. The oppositions reasons for protesting F1 are very clear OTOH - unless you think they are truly concerned about racing cars polluting their air.

At last, I would be really curious to learn in what way not having a F1 race would help the opposition in Bahrain. No race in 2011 didn't seem to help matters all that much.

I would have thought that the answer to your last question would provide the answer to the others: It deprives their enemy of a weapon. The GP is being used as a political weapon by the authorities - that is why there is opposition to the race.
There is no automatic link between funding and politicising, I agree. But I'm not arguing that. The Bahraini government is not merely funding the race, it is trying to use the race to portray a nation more at peace within itself than is the case. I don't think they are doing this purely for the benefit of the nations' trade balance either. I think they are doing it to alleviate international pressure on the authorities to institute reform.


(To answer your first point: No, I'm not sure. I don't understand why advertising works the way it does, but I recognise the fact that it does.)

#3632 as65p

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 00:15

I would have thought that the answer to your last question would provide the answer to the others: It deprives their enemy of a weapon. The GP is being used as a political weapon by the authorities - that is why there is opposition to the race.


Are you <cough> sure it hasn't been the other way round? It appears to me that the smartest and most obvious way for the Bahrain authorities to avoid the bad publicity they are getting now would have been to quietly drop the race half a year ago or so - if that bad publicity would have been the main concern. I really don't think hosting an F1 GP is, or ever was, their weapon of choice to fight the local opposition, that would have been incredibly ineffective. I agree that by now they are turning it into a nothing-(bad)-to-see-here-move-on campaign, but the initiative to use the GP as a political tool certainly appears top have come from the opposition, not the government.

There is no automatic link between funding and politicising, I agree. But I'm not arguing that. The Bahraini government is not merely funding the race, it is trying to use the race to portray a nation more at peace within itself than is the case. I don't think they are doing this purely for the benefit of the nations' trade balance either. I think they are doing it to alleviate international pressure on the authorities to institute reform.


Come on, even the silliest politician would conclude that it's too late for such a picture anyway, regardless if the race goes ahead. As such, I think the opposition has already won this little battle. In fact I'd say the current prospect of a race, with more opportunities to world-wide displays of protest is the ideal outcome for them.

Whatever, from my personal POV I can't get over this crap of using anywhich means to make a point about something completely different and unrelated.

#3633 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 00:17

The race is about control internally and the appearance to the rest of the world of business-as-usual.

Plus the small issue that if the race is cancelled two years in a row it doesn't come back.

#3634 IceSkyrim

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:01

I just think it is not necessary for Whitmarch to badmounth another place to justify a race in the filty rich Sheiklands and the origin of McLaren - Williams and Ferrari - backers TAG, Bin Ladden, Saudia, Albilad, Mubadala, Muktalat, Quatar Funds, etc.

#3635 Lotusseven

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:04

WEB >>>


I think this is is the same BOMB as you found.

:| It´s insane if F1 goes to Bahrain !

#3636 Bartel

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:08

If there's one thing I have learnt in 23 years its don't always believe the media. The person who wrote that story could be pro activist for all we know. I mean, how convenient that a bomb was found near the race track just a day after confirmation of the event taking place. Its very hard what to believe coming out of Bahrain that's why I think it should be a boycott, there could be no danger, but at the same time there could be alot of danger.

#3637 Watkins74

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:10

I think this is is the same BOMB as you found.

:| It´s insane if F1 goes to Bahrain !

Press TV is owned by the Government of Iran. Someone pass the salt please.

#3638 Watkins74

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:13

The race is about control internally and the appearance to the rest of the world of business-as-usual.
Plus the small issue that if the race is cancelled two years in a row it doesn't come back.

You have mentioned this a couple of times Ross and I think you have hit the nail on the head. They will do anything not to have it cancelled .

#3639 Bartel

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:13

Press TV is owned by the Government of Iran. Someone pass the salt please.

Puts my post into perspective greatly!

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#3640 eff1fan

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 02:14

Sadly it appears that Mercedes, Ferrari, McLaren, and the rest of the teams will all follow the terrible decision to set up a show in Bahrain.
They got money, who cares if they kill people protesting in the name of freedom, eh?

What is now needed is a worldwide boycott of everything and every product associated with F1

... it would be great but probably won't happen - too bad.

#3641 redbroccoli

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:40

Seems like Williams terminated a catering worker because she refused to go to Bahrain.
This isn't good...

@tomcary_tel
Bahrain still casting shadow tho. A member of Williams' catering staff has had her contract terminated after refusing to go on moral grounds

#3642 AFistfulofEastwood

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:50

Sadly it appears that Mercedes, Ferrari, McLaren, and the rest of the teams will all follow the terrible decision to set up a show in Bahrain.
They got money, who cares if they kill people protesting in the name of freedom, eh?

What is now needed is a worldwide boycott of everything and every product associated with F1

... it would be great but probably won't happen - too bad.


Some= of you dont even sound like F1 fans. F1 is not killing anyone. Its already been stated that event in Bahrain have been massively overstated. There a few troublemaking groups who want to cause trouble for the hell of it. I wont lose any sleep in them getting locked up.

#3643 DracoN

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:15

Cool, folks are moral now. But when their coutrys invade for "Democracy" to pump out resources then its ok.
"We can kill , we fight for democracy and freedom "


#3644 jjcale

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 06:15

This is a report on the latest protests from the protestors side but the interviewer is neutral.

It is from an organisation that has a good track record for accuracy ... much better than most mainstream news sources (but that's not hard IMO...)

Its worth your 15 minutes ... unless of course you dont want to keep claiming "we dont really know what's going there".

There is no news organisation in the world that does not have a bias... not the BBC, not CNN, not Russia Today or Press TV, not ABC, CBS and NBC, not DW ... no one is free from bias. If you want to be informed you have to take time and effort to find out from mulitiple sources and you have to use a bit of intelligence and judgment (....but that's why we went to school when we were young - to acquire these skills)... the folks who keep saying "we dont really know what's going on" sound like simpletons to me ... we are in 2012, you can find out if you really want to.... if you feel you dont know enough then dont comment ... dont comment at all.



#3645 jjcale

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 06:19

Press TV is owned by the Government of Iran. Someone pass the salt please.


So what... the story is not a fake... this did happen.... as for the gloss put on the story, well you have to use you own intelligence and experience to strip that away and get to the truth.

The question that also ought to be asked is why other certain other media have not reported on this...

Edited by jjcale, 15 April 2012 - 06:22.


#3646 britishtrident

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:48

Contrary to what others have posted I would suggest cancellation of the race last year along with other international repercussions did have an effect on the treatment of protesters, without international pressure we may have seen a much more hard line repression and probably mountains of body bags.

The Bahrain ruling elite still have the opportunity to institute substantial human rights reforms and keep control of their country.


#3647 Longtimefan

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:55

Seems like Williams terminated a catering worker because she refused to go to Bahrain.
This isn't good...

@tomcary_tel
Bahrain still casting shadow tho. A member of Williams' catering staff has had her contract terminated after refusing to go on moral grounds


Way to look like assholes Williams... :down:

#3648 CrucialXtreme

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 10:05

This morning police shot into a crowd of people/protesters. Not sure if anyone was killed.

#3649 Jimisgod

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:10

This morning police shot into a crowd of people/protesters. Not sure if anyone was killed.


http://www.aljazeera...4230727719.html

A 15-year-old boy was shot in the chest by anti-riot police in Bahrain during a funeral procession for an activist killed last month, according to an opposition group.

Mohammed Ahmed Abdel Aziz was in intensive care and several others wounded when police fired on mourners with tear gas and live rounds, the Al-Wefaq group said on Saturday.

Thousands of people attended the funeral procession on Friday for Ahmed Ismail, 22, in Salmabad just outside the capital Manama.


And they are still going ahead. :down: There went any lingering respect for the FIA. I get the feeling we will see a truly black day for the sport next Sunday, not that it isn't already, because something will happen and there will be lots of finger pointing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...e-east-17663642

Probably already been posted.

Edited by Jimisgod, 15 April 2012 - 11:15.


#3650 KateLM

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:14

Way to look like assholes Williams... :down:

I feel sorry for the caterer and I can understand why anyone wouldn't want to go to the race. BUT - I can also understand William's decision. If they let one person off then I'm sure a not insignificant number of team members will say they don't want to go either. And they really can't afford to breach their contract with the FIA by not racing.