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Sportscar racing in the South; from Texas to Florida


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#51 ERault

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 18:30

I know Carroll Shelby usually wore a white helmet in 1958 - but?


I agree our man looks like Shelby, but if I have the date right, Shelby was at Riverside for the LA Times GP that day.

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#52 David McKinney

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 18:56

I did wonder about that...

#53 Jerry Entin

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 21:33

David, that occurred to us as well, since Shelby had pulled a similar stunt as "John Smith" at Mansfield in September 1957, with one of the A.D. Logan Ferraris.

However, the Fall Roundup Races at Eagle Mountain were held on October 12, 1958. And as already stated by ERault, Shelby raced the Temple Buell Maserati 470S that very weekend in the Times Grand Prix at Riverside.

Edited by Jerry Entin, 11 March 2011 - 21:34.


#54 Jerry Entin

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 15:07

Posted Image
Eagle Mountain, April 1957: Bob Schroeder Kurtis/Chevy

Looks like Bob Schroeder has got in trouble while chasing Bob Stonedale [BM-class Corvette prepared by Frank McGurk] and Dave Tallaksen [Jaguar XK-SS].



Photo: Bob Jackson
all reseasrch: Willem Oosthoek

#55 Jerry Entin

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 15:48

Posted Image

Starter Jimmy Stout waves off Saturday's Novice Race at Galveston's Scholes Field.

Bob Wark [Corvette #33] won the Novice Race over Bob Ferguson in the Stonedale Jaguar XK-SS during the inaugural Gran Carrera Lafitte at Galveston Island in July 1957.



Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 16 April 2011 - 15:50.


#56 Jerry Entin

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 21:25

Posted Image
The Mercedes-powered Hughes-Kircher Special
The Hughes-Kircher Special was raced by Danny Collins in the 6th Annual Road races at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in September 1957.

The H-K Special was built in 1954 by Charlie Hughes and Kurt Kircher of Denver, Colorado. German born Kircher was a test driver for BMW and Alfa Romeo before coming to the U.S. in 1949. Originally the car used a Jaguar XK-120 engine and Kircher won the Fort Sumner feature in September 1954. By 1957 the Jaguar engine had been replaced by a Mercedes 300SL unit. Its entire body, painted in Hughes' favorite blue, could be lifted for easy maintenance.




Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 16 April 2011 - 21:28.


#57 bradbury west

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:35

Any news on the publication date, Jerry?
Roger Lund

#58 Jerry Entin

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 12:56

Posted Image
Two other entries during the 6th Annual Fort Sumner Races of September 1957.

Todd Aikens of Wichita, Kansas, brought this Jaguar C-type. Behind the Jag is the Kurtis/Buick of Alex Budurin of Tucson, Arizona.

Today the Fort Sumner races are largely forgotten and the location is mostly known for the grave site of Billy the Kid.


Roger, two more weeks of patience and the book will be available.

Edited by Jerry Entin, 17 April 2011 - 13:01.


#59 Jerry Entin

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 23:00

Posted Image
Mansfield, August 1958: Ray Jones during practice with the biggest beast in the South in 1958, the Logan 410S Ferrari, chassis 0596.

Billed in the program as a 5.5-liter Ferrari, "the biggest ever to race at Mansfield", the former works car was actually a 4.9-liter. Ferrari historians claim that Logan did a lease deal with Chinetti for Mansfield, but Dick Irish, who wrenched for Logan at the time, says that the fruit and vegetable king from Tulsa, Oklahoma, did buy it from Chinetti. Irish should know. When Logan presented Chinetti with an out-of-state banker's check for the purchase of the 410S, Luigi refused to accept it, and it was up to Irish to cash it at a nearby bank. Walking around NYC with $10,000 in cash made Irish very uncomfortable.



Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 18 April 2011 - 23:04.


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#60 RA Historian

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 00:12

Ferrari 410-S #0596 now owned by Brian Ross and painted yellow. Was displayed at the 2009 Milwaukee Masterpiece Showcase of Speed and Style. A fantastic beast!
Tom

#61 E1pix

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 06:45

Posted Image
The Mercedes-powered Hughes-Kircher Special
The Hughes-Kircher Special was raced by Danny Collins in the 6th Annual Road races at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in September 1957.

The H-K Special was built in 1954 by Charlie Hughes and Kurt Kircher of Denver, Colorado. German born Kircher was a test driver for BMW and Alfa Romeo before coming to the U.S. in 1949. Originally the car used a Jaguar XK-120 engine and Kircher won the Fort Sumner feature in September 1954. By 1957 the Jaguar engine had been replaced by a Mercedes 300SL unit. Its entire body, painted in Hughes' favorite blue, could be lifted for easy maintenance.

Photo: Bob Jackson


I hope it's fitting here for me to share a few thoughts and honors about Danny Collins, these words over six years in the making.

I first met Danny at John Barker's Performance Development & Racing shop in 1980, in Denver (John drove in pro F5000 in the early Continental days). I was the sign painter there from 1980 on, and Danny walked in one day, a friend of "Barker's," introduced himself, and instantly regaled me with tales of European and sports car racing from his treasured yet already-distant past. Makes like Ferrari and Maserati, and famed European circuits exhausted from his boundless recollections. I was 19, and he spoke as if it all was a memory of last week.... I loved it, and Danny, immediately.

When I finally pitched my graphic wares, he explained that the best car color is simple yellow, nothing else, for its visibility to other drivers. Essentially "The less graphics, the better," to my young ears, eager to sell, a rather strange concept for my wanting to replace worn brushes as often as possible. Thinking wholly of paint-stained fingernails, and profits therefrom, I countered that additional signage would occupy maybe 1% or so of the yellow's "space." Nope, yellow it shall be, no interruption. I was left out of sales pitches, but got "Call sometime." A self-taught kid, that opened up a whole new world of color and its place for me.

After that, whenever Danny needed anything graphic on one of his all-yellow cars, he'd call. We'd drink tea, look at his old racing pictures, paint letters for maybe 10% of my visit, but mainly ponder the virtues and mysteries of speed for hours. I'd charge him a little something, it didn't matter. This happened many times over a decade, and I want to say he was one of the finest gentleman I have ever known — or had the honor to work for. He raced "in the day," survived it, and had a warm heart from it until the day he died. What more could any of us want in the end?

The last time I called Danny was in November of 2004, just before Thanksgiving. We talked a while, maybe 20 minutes or so. I managed to make him laugh as always, but then he said he didn't feel too well and we'd talk soon. The next morning I awoke to an email from a longtime, mutual Denver friend, the buyer of PDR in 1989, saying Danny had passed the afternoon before.

Danny Collins was of a scarce cloth in these times, of a weave we all still talk about, thinking it altogether gone, for whom racing was pure passion and nothing more. We all deserve more like him.

RIP, My Friend.

Edited by E1pix, 19 April 2011 - 08:27.


#62 Jerry Entin

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 19:46

E1Pix : Thanks for your kind words on Danny Collins

Yes, he was quite a driver.

Charlie Hughes bought a new Ferrari 250TR in 1958, Danny took it to two victories in the South that year [in spite of the fact that the car wasn't yellow!].

At Midland in August he beat Ebb Rose [Maserati 300S] and Bobby Aylward [Maserati 250S]. At Fort Sumner in October he left Hap Sharp [Maserati 200S] and Dick Morgensen [Ferrari 250TR] in the dust.

RIP: Danny Collins

#63 Raido

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 20:45

Posted Image
Sebring 1958: Alec Ulmann congratulates Porsche team manager Huschke von Hanstein
with the excellent performance of his team.


Wonder if he knew that's the hand of an ex-SS-man he's shaking.

Huschke von Hanstein did many good things for Porsche after the war, and didn't seem an unlikeable chap; but like many former Nazis, his past was hushed up rather impressively in that period.

Edited by Raido, 19 April 2011 - 20:45.


#64 RA Historian

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 22:09

Charlie Hughes bought a new Ferrari 250TR in 1958, Danny took it to two victories in the South that year [in spite of the fact that the car wasn't yellow!].

At Midland in August he beat Ebb Rose [Maserati 300S] and Bobby Aylward [Maserati 250S]. At Fort Sumner in October he left Hap Sharp [Maserati 200S] and Dick Morgensen [Ferrari 250TR] in the dust.

Dan Collins took third overall, first in Class DM, at the 1958 Road America June Sprints. He was beaten only by the two Briggs Cunningham Team Listers driven by Walt Hansgen and Ed Crawford. The 250 Testa Rossa was painted dark blue. I remember it well, as it was my first visit to Road America. I have been there hundreds and hundreds of days since. My second home. But I digress. I believe that was the only time Collins may have raced at Road America. In those days, today also for that matter, the 1000 mile tow from Denver to Elklhart Lake, Wis., was a long haul indeed.
Tom

#65 E1pix

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 22:40

E1Pix : Thanks for your kind words on Danny Collins

Yes, he was quite a driver.

Charlie Hughes bought a new Ferrari 250TR in 1958, Danny took it to two victories in the South that year [in spite of the fact that the car wasn't yellow!].

At Midland in August he beat Ebb Rose [Maserati 300S] and Bobby Aylward [Maserati 250S]. At Fort Sumner in October he left Hap Sharp [Maserati 200S] and Dick Morgensen [Ferrari 250TR] in the dust.

RIP: Danny Collins


Jerry, Thank You, I appreciate your bringing Danny into this discussion.

I actually know little of his early day successes, he didn't talk much about that, but rather the passions and fond memories that motor sport brought him. By the time I knew him, he ran a Formula Ford (of his own design if I'm not mistaken, and yellow of course) and had his Danny Collins Driving School going full sail even though he was quite "matured" by then. Active to the end, the way it should be.

The last I saw him was at Second Creek Raceway in 2002. I was running my 250 kart on an SCCA track for the first time and having a fine day (running decent FF times, as Danny pointed out). On maybe my best karting day, he made it all quite a bit brighter, as always. I miss him and am honored knowing I may have well been the last person to speak with him (aside from his wife, who answered my last call on the day he died in 2004).

I just found this, a nice tribute page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook....150109479415401


Dan Collins took third overall, first in Class DM, at the 1958 Road America June Sprints. He was beaten only by the two Briggs Cunningham Team Listers driven by Walt Hansgen and Ed Crawford. The 250 Testa Rossa was painted dark blue. I remember it well, as it was my first visit to Road America. I have been there hundreds and hundreds of days since. My second home. But I digress. I believe that was the only time Collins may have raced at Road America. In those days, today also for that matter, the 1000 mile tow from Denver to Elklhart Lake, Wis., was a long haul indeed.
Tom


RA:

Though he may have been listed as "Dan," he was "Danny" to all who knew him.

Thanks for the comment about him at the Sprints, really nice to hear he enjoyed success at my birthright circuit. Missed that race, minus 2 years old then! (my first was the '63 Sprints)




#66 Jerry Entin

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 22:55

Raido:
We don't know how much Alec Ulmann knew at the time, but in an interview sometime ago Dan Gurney said he was quite taken aback when visiting von Hanstein's residence in the early 60s, when he noticed a photo of his team boss in full Nazi uniform on display.



#67 packapoo

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 05:12

Jerry, as always fascinating memories - keep on posting. Please.
Doubt that I'll ever acquire this particular publication but the insights you have are remarkable, so, thank you.
Did endeavour to purchase a copy of the Road America (?) publication I saw mentioned in a thread (think it was yours). Didn't seem to like my address so wasn't to be.
Please, whilst I'm here, keep coming down under as I enjoy your coverage of the historic meetings in NZ. I don't get to much more then Hampton Downs so always lookout for your postings and the ensueing.


#68 bradbury west

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 06:31

Did endeavour to purchase a copy of the Road America (?) publication I saw mentioned in a thread (think it was yours). Didn't seem to like my address so wasn't to be.


I ordered Tom Shultz's book on RA from the website and it arrived here, UK, in 10 days, very well packed and presented. It is a good picture history of RA and is excellent value.
Roger Lund

#69 Jerry Entin

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 12:39

Posted Image
Carroll Shelby in the works Aston Martin DBR1/300 he shared with Roy Salvadori at Sebring in 1958.

The entry lasted only 62 laps, at which point Shelby came in holding the gearshift handle after the weld had broken. Holding the item for everybody to see, Shelby chased an embarrassed team manager John Wyer up and down pit lane.

In an interview with Chuck Daigh in 2000 Daigh recalled laughingly: "We used to call him 'Bill Sol' Shelby. There was a guy in Texas who got arrested for fraud with some grain elevators. His name was Billy Sol Estes and the guy was really a crook. It was a big thing at the time so we nicknamed Shelby, being from Texas, 'Bill Sol' Shelby!"

Packapoo: I have never been to New Zealand or Australia, the coverage I do on the events is sent to me by those who are at the event or are doing the media coordinating for the events. I put them up for others to enjoy.

Roger: Tom's book is very nice, and well prepared.

Edited by Jerry Entin, 20 April 2011 - 12:48.


#70 RA Historian

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 16:08

Did endeavour to purchase a copy of the Road America (?) publication I saw mentioned in a thread (think it was yours). Didn't seem to like my address so wasn't to be.



I ordered Tom Schultz's book on RA from the website and it arrived here, UK, in 10 days, very well packed and presented. It is a good picture history of RA and is excellent value.
Roger Lund



Roger: Tom's book is very nice, and well prepared.

The book, Road America, Celebrating Fifty Years of Road Racing, is available through the track's website. The address for the track store is https://www.roadamer...s.aspx?catid=14. I might add that the price has been discounted substantially since the book was published in 2005. (Good thing I took a lump sum rather than royalties!) The track is still selling the 50th Year DVD that Mike Beall did in 2005/6. Yours truly did most of the narration and interviews. It is listed on the same web page. End of commercial.

Roger, thanks for the purchase. Roger and Jerry, thanks for the kind words.
Tom

#71 Jerry Entin

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 18:54

Posted Image
Fort Worth-based Overseas Motors' sales manager Dave Tallaksen on his way to an excellent 4th overall at Sebring in 1958. His co-driver in the Lotus 11 was Sammy Weiss from California.

Team Lotus did well at Sebring in 1958. Dave Tallaksen and Sammy Weiss finished 4th overall with chassis 339, yet it was the #54 Lotus 11, chassis 503, that Jay Chamberlain dropped off in Fort Worth on his way back to California. Lotus importer Chamberlain and Bill Frost had taken it to 9th overall at Sebring. In its next appearance, at Galveston in April, Tallaksen and chassis 503 finished the feature in 10th overall [GM1].

Dave Tallaksen's career in foreign car sales led to various moves, from Fort Worth to Houston in the late 50s while by the early 60s he was operating out of Atlanta.

Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 21 April 2011 - 18:58.


#72 Jerry Entin

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 23:17

Posted Image
The Fort Worth Star-Telegram was always good in offering pre race publicity for the Eagle Mountain events. Big Jim Hall's car is his Ferrari 375MM, chassis 0376, while Earle Parker is caught painting the race number on his Ferrari 500TRC, chassis 0658.

Newspaper article: Willem Oosthoek Collection

Edited by Jerry Entin, 21 April 2011 - 23:21.


#73 fbarrett

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 23:38

Being interested in ancient Colorado motorsport, I'm going to be the first in line for this book!

Another point: Danny Collins was amazingly well-respected here in Colorado. For years he ran a one-man driving school at Second Creek Raceway, and I took a course from him in my lightly modified street 911E. After the obligatory classroom session, I was amazed that he never got into the car with me! His unique instructing technique was to simply watch as you drove "the line" then comment afterward. The biggest thing I learned from him was to "cling" around the inside of certain corners.

Yet another point, Jerry: on TNF I see some great photos by newspaper photographer Bob Jackson, who was best known for winning the Pulitzer Prize for his stunning photo of Jack Ruby shooting Lee Harvey Oswald in the Dallas jail. Until I began researching old Shelby photos and found his shot of Ken Miles "leaping" the GT350 at Green Valley Raceway, I never realized that Bob had shot so many racing photos. Thanks very much for bringing them to light again. As you no doubt know, Bob now lives in Colorado Springs. I hope his historic negatives and transparencies are being safely preserved.

Frank

Edited by fbarrett, 21 April 2011 - 23:38.


#74 Jerry Entin

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 00:43

Frank:
Bob Jackson was known around the Hall/Shelby agency as "three quarter" Jackson, since it seemed he spent 3/4 of his time around the shop in the late 50s. Willem Oosthoek tracked him down and has been instrumental in having Bob retrieve his old racing negatives from the crawl space under his house, where they have been resting all these years. Bob started shooting in 1956 and his work accounts for about 65% of the photos in Willem's upcoming book on sports car racing in the South.

#75 Jerry Entin

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 00:46

Posted Image
Bob Bondurant on final approach in his Cobra

Frank: Ken Miles wasn't the only one leaping at Green Valley, Bob Bondurant did so too!


Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 22 April 2011 - 00:49.


#76 ERIKZ

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 02:24

Posted Image
Bob Bondurant on final approach in his Cobra

Frank: Ken Miles wasn't the only one leaping at Green Valley, Bob Bondurant did so too!


Photo: Bob Jackson


That's Gene Hammon's Cobra with an unknown guest driver, most likely in practice. Bill Steele was has Hammon's hired gun for the sports car races and also drag racing.

#77 E1pix

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 03:49

That's Gene Hammon's Cobra with an unknown guest driver, most likely in practice. Bill Steele was has Hammon's hired gun for the sports car races and also drag racing.


Definitely Bob Bondurant's helmet scheme and face.


#78 ERIKZ

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 04:07

Definitely Bob Bondurant's helmet scheme and face.


Well.....of course its Bob, but it's interesting that he would be taking out a privateer Cobra when the Team/Factory 427 Cobra was his main ride until the cam broke....

#79 Jerry Entin

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 05:14

Posted Image
Bill Steele in same car

ERIKZ: Your right of course it is Bob Bondurant in the other photo.



Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 22 April 2011 - 05:20.


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#80 Jerry Entin

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 12:34

Posted Image
Hugh Grammer's Bobtail Cooper/Climax tries to hold off Ed French's Elva Mk 3/Climax at Mansfield in March of 1958.


Evenly matched, Grammer and French battled for most of the Feature, Race 7. The Elva finished 8th overall [GM2], followed by the Cooper in 9th [GM3]. The GM class win went to Bobby Aylward's Lotus 11/Climax [5th overall].



Photo: Bob Jackson

Edited by Jerry Entin, 22 April 2011 - 18:18.


#81 Hse289

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 13:14

Excellent pictures of the Cobra`s Jerry, thanks for posting.
Paul

#82 Jerry Entin

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 14:31

Posted Image
The starting grid of the inaugural Cocoa-Titusville races in Florida, July 1958.

Sometimes interesting photos are discovered after a book has gone to print already. This is one that did not make it in time for the Southern book, unfortunately. It was among some 145 color slides supplied a few weeks ago by Benita Lane, who was married to Fort Lauderdale brain surgeon David Lane at the time. It was Lane's first race in his Maserati 200SI.

The grid shows Ed Rahal [#100 white D-type, chassis 553] on pole, with Joe Sheppard [red 550RS] and Roy Schechter [silver 550RS] filling out the front row. In row 2 are Chick Butscher [red 500TRC, chassis 0668], David Lane [white 200SI, chassis 2422] and Bill Kimberly [#34 500TR, chassis 0642].

The Bobtail Cooper is probably Bob Dusinberre's, the modified Healey possibly Ernie Robinson, while the Lotus 11, based on its distinctive headrest, has been identified as chassis 218, although its driver is still unknown.


Photo: Benita Lane Collection

Edited by Jerry Entin, 24 April 2011 - 13:55.


#83 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 19:11

In an interview with Chuck Daigh in 2000 Daigh recalled laughingly: "We used to call him 'Bill Sol' Shelby. There was a guy in Texas who got arrested for fraud with some grain elevators. His name was Billy Sol Estes and the guy was really a crook. It was a big thing at the time so we nicknamed Shelby, being from Texas, 'Bill Sol' Shelby!"


The version I heard was that the boys at Holman Moody hung the "Billy Sol" (Estes) moniker on Shelby, and not in a jocular way, either.

Jack.

#84 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 19:16

The starting grid of the inaugural Cocoa-Titusville races in Florida, July 1958.

Sometimes interesting photos are discovered after a book has gone to print already. This is one that did not make it in time for the Southern book, unfortunately. It was among some 145 color slides supplied a few weeks ago by Benita Lane, who was married to Fort Lauderdale brain surgeon David Lane at the time. It was Lane's first race his Maserati 200SI.



Photo: Benita Lane Collection


I lived in Ft. Lauderdale (and still do) when David Lane was racing, and knew him superficially. He was a very well respected physician as well as an accomplished driver. I would love to see more of Mrs. Lane's photos.

Thanks.

Jack.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 23 April 2011 - 19:18.


#85 Jerry Entin

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 20:02

Posted Image
Dr. David Lane's 2- Liter Maserati in 1958
David's 2-liter Maserati is in the foreground. The guy with the yellow shirt is Lee Lilley, who a year later became Camoradi's third leg, responsible for the Miami shop.

Jack:
Billy Sol Estes was convicted in 1964 and who knows how long it took and when his various scams were discovered. Chuck Daigh was part of the Holman/Moody team as early as the Daytona 1000 KM in 1959, so when Daigh mentions "we" he may have referred to his old team members. Too late to ask him now.



Photo: Benita Lane Collection

Edited by Jerry Entin, 23 April 2011 - 23:44.


#86 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 21:25

Jerry,

Thanks for anticipating my unasked question: who was the "we" to which Chuck refered?

My recollection is that Dr. Lane raced a lot of Porsches, mostly 356 Carreras and 904s, frequently with Ft Lauderdale VW/Porsche dealership (Continental Motors) owner Chuck Cassel. They finished 59th at Sebring in 1965. That may have been the year that Lane had to leave the race to fly back to Ft. Lauderdale to tend to a patient, a spinal injury victim as I recall.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 23 April 2011 - 21:28.


#87 Cynic2

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 22:22

The Cobra probably belonged to Billy Steele, as he seemed to prefer #7.

Here is his Shelby-ized Ford Mustang, racing as an A Sedan in 1967 and '68. The first pictures, when it still had its white roof, might have been at Galveston; the later picture with the red roof might be at Seguin.


Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image

Edited by Cynic2, 24 April 2011 - 01:34.


#88 Jerry Entin

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 23:38

Jack:

Further to the "we", Chuck Daigh had extensive business dealing with H-M as well. When Willem Oosthoek interviewed him in 2000, this is what Chuck said when asked why he quit road racing following his 2nd place finish in the 1964 Riverside USRRC with the Arciero Lotus 19:

"I was getting really busy starting the Holman-Moody marine business. John Holman and I were both boat people. We had a little bit of Ford backing so we decided to make marine engines out of the Fords. I could buy H-M race engines in Charlotte after they had used them, sight unseen. Sometimes they had a hole in them but we would build them up, make all the pieces like the manifolds. We had a really good package.

When asked whether these were 289 or 427 engines, Chuck replied: "we did both but the 427 was a terrible marine engine. Unbelievably bad. But the 289 and the 351 package sold really well and we were making money."

all research: Willem Oosthoek

Edited by Jerry Entin, 23 April 2011 - 23:42.


#89 Jerry Entin

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 23:40

David Lane started competition in early 1958 with an Alfa Romeo and an AC/Bristol.
By July he raced the Maserati 200SI, followed by June 1959 by a Ferrari 250TR, ex- Jim Hunt. By early 1960 David ran the ex-Behra Porsche RSK, bought from Lucky Casner. He was good friend with Chuck Cassel, the Fort Lauderdale VW/Porsche dealer, which explains his Porsche rides, but in the early 60s he also competed with a 250GT SWB [courtesy of Gordon Pennington] and a LWB Tour de France [which may have been the former George Arents TdF].

David: Nice pictures you posted.


all research: Willem Oosthoek

Edited by Jerry Entin, 23 April 2011 - 23:44.


#90 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 00:14

followed by June 1959 by a Ferrari 250TR, he also competed with a 250GT SWB [courtesy of Gordon Pennington] and a LWB Tour de France [which may have been the former George Arents TdF].



Jerry,

I had no idea that Dr. Lane's driving C.V. was so diverse. I believe Arendts lived in south Florida (part time, at least) at the time which would partially explain that connection. Is there a photographic record of any of those Ferrari rides?

Thanks again.

Jack.

#91 Jerry Entin

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 13:46

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David Lane and his Ferrari 250 TR at Nassau in 1959. The Corvette on the right is Bill Parham's.

Photo: Benita Lane Collection

#92 Jerry Entin

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 19:40

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David Lane's early cars, an Alfa Romeo and AC/Bristol, seen during the Enoche at Gainesville, Georgia, in June 1958.

Behind the Alfa, part of George Koehne white-and-red Maserati 200SI can be seen. In the background the support vehicles of E.D. Martin [Martin Motors of Columbus, Georgia] and Jarrard Motors of Pensacola, Florida, a regular entrant of a Triumph for Smokey Drolet.



Photo: Benita Lane Collection

#93 hlfuzzball

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 19:09

Re: the Billy Sol moniker.......

Shelby's henchman, Al Dowd, was known as "Greasy Slick" !

#94 Vettefinderjim

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 17:16

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A surprise Feature winner of the 1957 SCCA National at Eagle Mountain: Dick Thompson in a production Corvette.


Driving a Lindsey Hopkins Corvette, Dick Thompson won Race 4 for big production cars during the National. Because of the wet weather, mechanic Red Byron changed the axle ratio of the car before the Feature, Race 8. In spite of a strong field of Ferraris, Maseratis and Porsches, Thompson caused a major upset by beating all the modifieds.

Note the nice 1957 Chevys in the background.


Photo: Bob Jackson

I believe this car is in Artic Blue paint, and it is I believe the factory # 4 Lindsey Hopkins entry that Dick and Gaston Andrey drove at SEBRING. Hopkins was the head of Coke-Cola, and Ed Cole used him to sponsor the production 57 SEBRING Corvettes, which were both white with blue stripes and red interiors.

Dick Doane from Dundee, Illnois and his Chevrolet Dealership sponsored race Corvette in 56 and 57, and his colors were Artic Blue, as I believe is this paint color. I talked to Eve Thompson in April 2013 after finding another photo of this car at ROAD AMERICA in June 57 in the same livery. It had # 4 SEBRING on the door and the ''bungie cord tie down'' on the trunk. She confirmed with Dick it was the winning white car and DICK DOANE bought the car after the March SEBRING event and Dr. Dick raced it thruout 1957., These photos help in the history of these great 57 Corvette race cars.

Edited by Vettefinderjim, 15 April 2013 - 18:44.


#95 Vettefinderjim

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 17:50

Being interested in ancient Colorado motorsport, I'm going to be the first in line for this book!

Another point: Danny Collins was amazingly well-respected here in Colorado. For years he ran a one-man driving school at Second Creek Raceway, and I took a course from him in my lightly modified street 911E. After the obligatory classroom session, I was amazed that he never got into the car with me! His unique instructing technique was to simply watch as you drove "the line" then comment afterward. The biggest thing I learned from him was to "cling" around the inside of certain corners.

Yet another point, Jerry: on TNF I see some great photos by newspaper photographer Bob Jackson, who was best known for winning the Pulitzer Prize for his stunning photo of Jack Ruby shooting Lee Harvey Oswald in the Dallas jail. Until I began researching old Shelby photos and found his shot of Ken Miles "leaping" the GT350 at Green Valley Raceway, I never realized that Bob had shot so many racing photos. Thanks very much for bringing them to light again. As you no doubt know, Bob now lives in Colorado Springs. I hope his historic negatives and transparencies are being safely preserved.

Frank

I would really like to meet BOB JACKSON. Do you have a contact for him?


#96 fbarrett

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 20:15

Jim:

I don't have current contact info, but I've sent you an e-mail with a couple of leads.

Frank

#97 MailbuBeach

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 21:57

Posted Image
David Lane's early cars, an Alfa Romeo and AC/Bristol, seen during the Enoche at Gainesville, Georgia, in June 1958.

Behind the Alfa, part of George Koehne white-and-red Maserati 200SI can be seen. In the background the support vehicles of E.D. Martin [Martin Motors of Columbus, Georgia] and Jarrard Motors of Pensacola, Florida, a regular entrant of a Triumph for Smokey Drolet.



Photo: Benita Lane Collection



Do you think there are any December 1956 Nassau pictures in the Benita Lane Collection?

Below is a picture of one of the three Nassau Corvettes now at New Smyrna, Florida February 1957 during the first NASCAR Sports Car race.

Joe

Posted Image



#98 Jerry Entin

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 00:25

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Gary Laughlin and his Burney Russell-prepared 750 Monza [chassis 0496] on their way to victory at Eagle Mountain, Texas, in April 1957.

After serving as a jet pilot in WWII and the Korean War, Fort Worth-based Gary Laughlin pursued a career in the international oil exploration business. In between he found time to compete in sports car events in the Southwest.

In 1959 Gary Laughlin was the driving force behind the three Corvette Italias that were built by Scaglietti, commissioned in partnership with Carroll Shelby and Jim Hall of Dallas. Shelby was instrumental in securing three rolling chassis from Ed Cole but failed to pay for his finished Italia, so it was sold to someone else. Hall did not like the fact that he received the only Italia with an automatic gearbox and sold his as well. Laughlin was not thrilled with the end result either and production ended at three.

But Laughlin is better known for being a passenger in Fangio's Lancia in September of 1957. Given a lift by the world champion, Gary walked away unharmed when the car hit an errant truck at 120 mph, halfway between Milan and Modena. Fangio suffered minor injuries that prevented him from participating in the Modena GP.

On May 4 Gary will celebrate his 88th birthday. He is still going strong and just e-mailed us: "Still vertical, playing golf, walking 18, shooting well below my age. I still like hot cars. I really miss flying. Racing then was an amateur sport and it was fun, not the business it's become."

Happy Birthday, Gary!


Photo: Bob Jackson

#99 MailbuBeach

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Posted 06 May 2011 - 14:29

Posted Image
Gary Laughlin and his Burney Russell-prepared 750 Monza [chassis 0496] on their way to victory at Eagle Mountain, Texas, in April 1957.

After serving as a jet pilot in WWII and the Korean War, Fort Worth-based Gary Laughlin pursued a career in the international oil exploration business. In between he found time to compete in sports car events in the Southwest.

In 1959 Gary Laughlin was the driving force behind the three Corvette Italias that were built by Scaglietti, commissioned in partnership with Carroll Shelby and Jim Hall of Dallas. Shelby was instrumental in securing three rolling chassis from Ed Cole but failed to pay for his finished Italia, so it was sold to someone else. Hall did not like the fact that he received the only Italia with an automatic gearbox and sold his as well. Laughlin was not thrilled with the end result either and production ended at three.

But Laughlin is better known for being a passenger in Fangio's Lancia in September of 1957. Given a lift by the world champion, Gary walked away unharmed when the car hit an errant truck at 120 mph, halfway between Milan and Modena. Fangio suffered minor injuries that prevented him from participating in the Modena GP.

On May 4 Gary will celebrate his 88th birthday. He is still going strong and just e-mailed us: "Still vertical, playing golf, walking 18, shooting well below my age. I still like hot cars. I really miss flying. Racing then was an amateur sport and it was fun, not the business it's become."

Happy Birthday, Gary!


Photo: Bob Jackson


Jerry

Would the three rolling chassis's have been Corvette chassis's with drive trains? Would they have chassis or VIN #'s stamped on the chassis's? Is there a surviving car that would reveal the answer to what the chassis # is?

Thanks,

Joe


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#100 Vettefinderjim

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Posted 06 May 2011 - 16:10

Jerry

Would the three rolling chassis's have been Corvette chassis's with drive trains? Would they have chassis or VIN #'s stamped on the chassis's? Is there a surviving car that would reveal the answer to what the chassis # is?

Thanks,

Joe

Corvette Mike Vietro in Anaheim sold one of the Scaglietti Corvettes to Bill Watkins I believe. And I remember it having a 1959 vin number and 283 fuel injection engine and 59 T-10 vintage 4 speed trans and differential. They were beautiful cars to look at, and fun to drive but hot inside and but handled and stopped like a solid axel Corvette.