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#101 GreenMachine

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 05:12

Oi David, have you been pinching my photos?*  :rotfl:  I have a photo of the Lola(?) engine bay taken from almost exactly the same angle, and I went soooo close to posting it with the others but I thought three was enough!
 
Lee, that is the Kurtis, if that helps -
 
IMGP5854-2-L.jpg
 
I agree about the MSD box, and the modern fittings.


*Joke, to be clear.



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#102 jj2728

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 10:36

I think I must have deleted some files by accident....oh well, some more then.
All Copyright JAG

Mid-Ohio 1972 Can Am
McLarenV8_zps664f6cbc.jpg

V8_zpse69f4802.jpg

Big red pipes. Daytona 1967
Gauerke-03-019rs_zps8e036543.jpg

#103 bradbury west

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 11:59

ISTR that Soichiro Honda used a Curtiss V8 in his first car, exposed pushrods and rockers IIRC. It was at the FoS a few years ago. OT I know.
Roger Lund

#104 Michael Ferner

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 14:54

Speaking of Curtis V8s

IMG_4475sc.jpg

 

a plate inside the Monarch suggests the motor came from a Curtis H12 flying boat powered by a 160 hp Curtis V-X-X I believe.

 

 

Ralph, can I suggest you adjust your spelling, if not to the majority of well-informed posters here, then to that number plate?

 

It really iss... Curtiss ...ss ...ss ...ss!!  ;)  ;)



#105 E.B.

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:20

I guess we should be grateful the founder's first name wasn't Frank.

#106 arttidesco

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 17:12

Ralph, can I suggest you adjust your spelling, if not to the majority of well-informed posters here, then to that number plate?

 

It really iss... Curtiss ...ss ...ss ...ss!!   ;)   ;)

:blush: :blush: :blush:  ;)



#107 arttidesco

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 20:43

05_IMG_2074sc.jpg

 

Can any experts tell from this photo if I am looking at a Chevrolet or a Repco Holden V8 here, and what the difference is ? :confused:



#108 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 21:33

05_IMG_2074sc.jpg

 

Can any experts tell from this photo if I am looking at a Chevrolet or a Repco Holden V8 here, and what the difference is ? :confused:

Chev and the difference is huge. In 5000 form same bore and stroke, 4x3".

Chev can use longer rods, the heads are 5 bolts per cyl unlike the Holden with 4 on the end cylinders, and they blow the headgaskets out the front and rear! Chev heads make more power, the blocks are stiffer though the Repco did adress that to a point. Firing order is different.

Too look at Chev has the 4 bolts holding down the rectangular rocker covers, Holden has 6 bolts holding down more asymetrical rocker covers. On a 5000 engine Chev will have 1/8 or larger primary pipes too.

Reputedly the Holden V8 started life as a Pontiac forklift engine. How true that is I am not sure.

The Holden is often known as the "Plastic engine or plastic fantastic for its frailties. Repco and Holden  did adress some of the problems when they made 5000 engines in the early seventies.

Post 98 on the previous page shows a HDT Torana with a period modified 308 Holden.


Edited by Lee Nicolle, 07 December 2014 - 21:39.


#109 arttidesco

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 22:22

Thanks for your comprehensive description Lee :up:

 

It has also been pointed out to me elsewhere since I posted the pic that the Repco Holden had twin ignition coils and the outer exhaust ports are much closer to the center ports :wave:



#110 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 23:45

Lee, I am continually amazed at your posts...

The way you can introduce and hammer home your personal bias on engines and cars is incredible.

There were way more Chevs ran in the F5000 era than Repco-Holdens, yet when you look at the record book you find in the years Repco supported their Holden V8s:

Australian Grand Prix victories - 1970 and 1971 (Frank Matich), 1976 (John Goss). Worth mentioning - 1973 John McCormack was leading with three laps to go when his suspension collapsed.

Australian Gold Star winners - 1972 (Matich), 1973 (McCormack), 1976 (McCormack).

In your domain, Sports Sedans, look at how dominant McCormack was when he brought along his Repco-Holden powered Charger, while Edmondson was still successful with Don Elliot's Repco-Holden powered Alfetta up until 1980. The HDT Toranas, both the 'Beast' and its nicer successor, had their moments in the sun and no real issues with the engine.

In 1975, with the final Tasman Cup title all but wrapped up, John Walker wrote of practice at Sandown with his Repco-Holden powered Lola, "I could pass anyone wherever I liked, I didn't have to worry about the start because I knew I could drive past them on the straight." And then his car mysteriously turned left at the end of the back straight on the first lap.

As I recall, the Holden V8 was built to use Holden 6 components to simplify manufacture in our low-volume market, so it's unlikely that the 'Pontiac forklift engine' theory has any basis.

Finally, while arttidesco asked what he could see about the engine that differed, you answered with a bunch of unseeable stuff, though the assymetric rocker cover was relevant. The most obvious difference is the inlet trumpets:

1214frf5000_Walker_Repco.jpg

See the size of the gap between the trumpet pairs? Here's another view:

1214frf5000matichengine.jpg

Edited by Ray Bell, 07 December 2014 - 23:46.


#111 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 03:48

Lee, I am continually amazed at your posts...

The way you can introduce and hammer home your personal bias on engines and cars is incredible.

There were way more Chevs ran in the F5000 era than Repco-Holdens, yet when you look at the record book you find in the years Repco supported their Holden V8s:

Australian Grand Prix victories - 1970 and 1971 (Frank Matich), 1976 (John Goss). Worth mentioning - 1973 John McCormack was leading with three laps to go when his suspension collapsed.

Australian Gold Star winners - 1972 (Matich), 1973 (McCormack), 1976 (McCormack).

In your domain, Sports Sedans, look at how dominant McCormack was when he brought along his Repco-Holden powered Charger, while Edmondson was still successful with Don Elliot's Repco-Holden powered Alfetta up until 1980. The HDT Toranas, both the 'Beast' and its nicer successor, had their moments in the sun and no real issues with the engine.

In 1975, with the final Tasman Cup title all but wrapped up, John Walker wrote of practice at Sandown with his Repco-Holden powered Lola, "I could pass anyone wherever I liked, I didn't have to worry about the start because I knew I could drive past them on the straight." And then his car mysteriously turned left at the end of the back straight on the first lap.

As I recall, the Holden V8 was built to use Holden 6 components to simplify manufacture in our low-volume market, so it's unlikely that the 'Pontiac forklift engine' theory has any basis.

Finally, while arttidesco asked what he could see about the engine that differed, you answered with a bunch of unseeable stuff, though the assymetric rocker cover was relevant. The most obvious difference is the inlet trumpets:

1214frf5000_Walker_Repco.jpg

See the size of the gap between the trumpet pairs? Here's another view:

1214frf5000matichengine.jpg

Ray, the Chev made more  power in period. Quite simple the heads flow more air than the Holden ones. Any 'fuellie' head does yet alone the 292 'turbo' head used on Z28s and LT1s in about 1970. Plus stronger internals too.  Though the The Repco Holden was reputedly very driveable though and was a well developed engine. 

Why did Mac use them? Because he had them for the 5000. But Elfin around the corner used Chevs reputedly with better reliability.

Remember too the Repco in its most expensive form was special blocks, cranks, rods, pistons. reputedly even head castings too. As were the special Chev blocks of the period. There was less developed 'budget' Repcos too. Mostly std components with tidied up heads valve train and the like. Dual point dissys with std 4bbl manifolds, some ported for Holleys and some not. L34 style for the most part. I have seen a couple. One in an SLR5000 in the 70s and the other was used for speedway in a HT Monaro.,,, replaced with a Chev!

HDT used Repcos too because they represented HOLDEN. And I dare say they were cheaper in period too. Especially to HDT!

As for straight line if the cars are geared properly they will be fairly quick too.

There is NO Holden 6 stuff in a Holden V8 apart from the ring set for the 253. A family car engine nothing else.Actually quite a few Chev parts are the same or interchange with the red 6.

I have a moderate amount of experience with the plastic engine. And know its frailtys. Plus ofcourse for Sports Sedan 6 litre is the limit. And until the later 90s no Holden heads were very efficient with a Chev crank in them. These days there is a deal of good stuff available. Harrop cranks, several good aftermarket heads in the std configuration yet alone VN on style engine.

World wide if the Repco was better they would have used them, they used mostly Chevs for 5000. A very few Windsors and in the US very early [Formuala A] some Mopars too. Short stroke 340s



#112 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 04:34

Elfin never used Chevs while McCormack had his Repco-Holdens...

Lee, I never said anything about their potential or cost, I just pointed out that to say what you did, that they were fragile etc, was proven wrong by their results.

Why would overseas people use them, by the way? There were Chevs of pretty much equal performance to the Repco-Holden everywhere and they didn't have to get bits from Melbourne.

I have never heard of genuine Repco-Holden engines with carburettors etc.

And by the way, please understand, the term is not 'yet alone' it is 'let alone'...

#113 Marc Sproule

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 06:35

5 liter "stock block" chevy v-8 in the march 827 can am car run by newman racing....

 

https://www.flickr.c...@N03/5443078057

 

https://www.flickr.c...@N03/5443680570

 

'87 cosworth dfx in arie luyendyk's car.....

 

https://www.flickr.c...N03/14729761342

 

unfortunately the last pic i'd like to post is buried somewhere in storage. it's a studio shot of the v-8 chevy indy turbo that penske introduced sometime in the '80s.

 

the pic was in the press kit that they handed out at phoenix when they introduced the engine.

 

the description under the engine said, "the 4 cylinder v-8 chevy indy car engine"

 

obviously the copywriter was having a bad day when that was written 'cuz it should have said "4 valve per cylinder v-8".

 

i grabbed several of the kits as souvenirs and as i walked out of the press i ran into penske's pr chief, dan luginbuhl.

 

he looked at the description, looked at me and said one word, "shit!!"

 

i reckon the person who wrote the description heard about it in short order.

 

 

 

 



#114 arttidesco

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 07:56

Thanks for your further clarification Ray  :up: 



#115 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 08:41

Elfin never used Chevs while McCormack had his Repco-Holdens...

Lee, I never said anything about their potential or cost, I just pointed out that to say what you did, that they were fragile etc, was proven wrong by their results.

Why would overseas people use them, by the way? There were Chevs of pretty much equal performance to the Repco-Holden everywhere and they didn't have to get bits from Melbourne.

I have never heard of genuine Repco-Holden engines with carburettors etc.

And by the way, please understand, the term is not 'yet alone' it is 'let alone'...

Elfin used Holdens in the MR5, after that it was Chevs.

Even 40 years ago the info and availability to run a Chev was well known. Wether it was as cheap is another matter though I cannot see it being expensive.



#116 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 09:03

That's what I said, Lee...

#117 yasmin

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 11:49

Great work Lee, many thanks



#118 antonvrs

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 03:26

Here are a load of photos of V8 engines, everything from the flathead Ford V860, 2 special V8 midget engines, through to a Can Am big banger.
056819x850.jpg

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311850x745.jpg

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GoodwoodFOS1996067850x437.jpg

DoningtonMuseum1037850x656.jpg

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124850x642.jpg

122850x659.jpg

116793x577.jpg

104783x850.jpg

100_1667772x850.jpg

083725x850.jpg

083687x850.jpg

073850x642.jpg

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050638x850.jpg

021850x779.jpg

006728x850.jpg

019781x850.jpg



From the top:
Ford V860 Midget engine
Synergy V8 Midget engine (modern)
Kenyon Bros Midget engine
Olds in Old Yeller
GM V8 in restored Rod Coppins Pontiac
F5000 Chev
Repco
Scarab Chev
Climax 1.5
Ford sb in restored race Mustang
Nostalgia Dragsters. BB Chev? SB Chev Chrysler Hemi
Ford V8 Flathead with Edelbrock heads
Ford Cosworth DFV in M23/1
Ford Sprintcar Alloy Block (modern).
Gaerte sb Chev Alloy Block (modern)
SB Chev Can-Am
Kriners Alloy Block Sprintcar (modern)
Repco Brabham
BB Chev in McLaren M12

All photos taken by me.

That's not a Chevy in Old Yeller- it's a "nailhead" Buick



#119 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 05:59

That's not a Chevy in Old Yeller- it's a "nailhead" Buick

The Buick is correct in old Yeller.

The Kenyon engine. What is it based on? bike engines obviously.

The modern V8 midget engine? Is that out of NZ and what is that based on?

 The Fontana Sprintcar  Ford based engine is a rare sight. They are in effect a Cleveland with Windsor oiling, the hard way to go about things. The bigger block though allows better rod ratios and etc. I am not sure any of that stuff is still available now. The inline midget engine based on half that block and  one head though is. Those I have seen.


Edited by Lee Nicolle, 09 December 2014 - 23:20.


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#120 Ray Bell

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 18:52

Guys, is there anything wrong with putting the caption with each pic?

Especially when there are so many pics, it's difficult to keep track of things like this...

#121 D-Type

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 23:00

Guys, is there anything wrong with putting the caption with each pic?

Especially when there are so many pics, it's difficult to keep track of things like this...

Hear! Hear!  :up:



#122 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 23:22

Hear! Hear!  :up:

Duncan, as I have just put on the Uraidla thread it is generally not easy to give individual captions. If at all. 

Time consuming and hard work to get any pics up!



#123 D-Type

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 00:52

It used to be possible - yet another unexpected consequence of the software updowngrade no doubt.


Edited by D-Type, 10 December 2014 - 00:52.


#124 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 04:07

It used to be possible - yet another unexpected consequence of the software updowngrade no doubt.

I think you can still do it easy enough with Image Shack, but that is paid now. And the ones that are not disapear quite quickly.



#125 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 04:38

I am learning not to make assumptions, but I believe you regarding the rounding off :wave:

IMG_2407sc.jpg

IMG_2411sc.jpg

Meantime IIUC the 24 studs on these flat heads might indicate they are Ford Mercury V8's 3917 cc or 239 cui rounded off to the nearest unit ?

You do not realise how many variations there are on sidevalves. Both of those are different, Or at least the heads are. One has the water outlets centre and one front. The V860 near the start is different again.

Plus the afore mententioned number of studs of which I think there is three! Inc V860.



#126 fredeuce

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 06:09

The fact of there being 24 studs does not translate to it being a Mercury.

 

Some background . The fact is the Ford sidevalve V8 started life in the 1932 model year with 21 studs and water pumps at the front of the heads.

 

As the engine evolved the water pumps were moved to the block. This occurred in 1937. The change to 24 studs came in 1938. Up til then they were all 221 ci. The little v8-60 came along in 1937 . Easily picked by its small size and 17 stud heads.

 

The Mercury came along in 1939 . This was characterised by an increase  in bore size from 3 1/16" to 3 3/16" increasing the capacity from 221ci to 239 ci. It also came with a horsepower increase from 85bhp to 95bhp. The lower picture above is simply a 24 studder  and that's all that can be said without measuring bores checking casting numbers etc. The 239 ci engine in this guise became standard fitment across the range in 1946 I believe.

 

The engine in the top picture is a late flathead from 1949-53 ('54 in Australia) . It is somewhat modernised by having a detachable belhousing where as the early versions it was partially cast into the block and partially into the front of the gearbox.

 

Another identifer is the modern looking distributor up in front of the right-hand bank of cylinders. Looks the goods but barely adequate even for the standard flatty.

 

These modern flatty's still retained the same bore and stroke of 3 3/16" by 3 3/4" stroke(239) ci.  In 1949 for the Mercury range they used the same engine but introduced a new crank with an 1/4" stroke increase (now 4") taking it out to 255 ci.

 

This a bit of insight into the history of these venerable old engines that powered literally millions of vehicles over the years not to mention the large reliance upon them during WWII in all sorts of vehicles. There were apparently some aircraft fitted with them although they were cast in aluminium alloy. Not only this it changed the idea that the V8 was the stuff of luxury and the domain of the rich. It became affordable to the working man. Of course this idea over time was taken up by all of the manufacturers in the US and made them utterly ubiquitous.


Edited by fredeuce, 10 December 2014 - 07:07.


#127 GeoffR

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 09:28

Posting pics is not so difficult with Photobucket:

 

Camaro V8

 

BobJane427Camaroengine_zps2d5eb66d.jpg

 

F5000

 

F5000engine2_zps03fcb531.jpg

 

Matich Repco

 

Matich-RepcoSR4engine_zps6997d992.jpg



#128 Stephen W

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 11:25

Duncan, as I have just put on the Uraidla thread it is generally not easy to give individual captions. If at all. 

Time consuming and hard work to get any pics up!

 

Dead simple to put in captions as you upload. Can't see why you are having problems.



#129 kayemod

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 11:59

Dead simple to put in captions as you upload. Can't see why you are having problems.

 

The way I do it is post the pics from Photobucket, refresh so that they appear on the forum, then click on 'edit', and add the captions where required. If I can manage to do that, anyone can. Sometimes I have to go back through 'edit' a couple of times until I get what I want, but I'd have thought that all this was simpler and much quicker than trying to get a complicated pic-filled post right in the first place, it certainly is for me.



#130 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 21:33

The fact of there being 24 studs does not translate to it being a Mercury.

 

Some background . The fact is the Ford sidevalve V8 started life in the 1932 model year with 21 studs and water pumps at the front of the heads.

 

As the engine evolved the water pumps were moved to the block. This occurred in 1937. The change to 24 studs came in 1938. Up til then they were all 221 ci. The little v8-60 came along in 1937 . Easily picked by its small size and 17 stud heads.

 

The Mercury came along in 1939 . This was characterised by an increase  in bore size from 3 1/16" to 3 3/16" increasing the capacity from 221ci to 239 ci. It also came with a horsepower increase from 85bhp to 95bhp. The lower picture above is simply a 24 studder  and that's all that can be said without measuring bores checking casting numbers etc. The 239 ci engine in this guise became standard fitment across the range in 1946 I believe.

 

The engine in the top picture is a late flathead from 1949-53 ('54 in Australia) . It is somewhat modernised by having a detachable belhousing where as the early versions it was partially cast into the block and partially into the front of the gearbox.

 

Another identifer is the modern looking distributor up in front of the right-hand bank of cylinders. Looks the goods but barely adequate even for the standard flatty.

 

These modern flatty's still retained the same bore and stroke of 3 3/16" by 3 3/4" stroke(239) ci.  In 1949 for the Mercury range they used the same engine but introduced a new crank with an 1/4" stroke increase (now 4") taking it out to 255 ci.

 

This a bit of insight into the history of these venerable old engines that powered literally millions of vehicles over the years not to mention the large reliance upon them during WWII in all sorts of vehicles. There were apparently some aircraft fitted with them although they were cast in aluminium alloy. Not only this it changed the idea that the V8 was the stuff of luxury and the domain of the rich. It became affordable to the working man. Of course this idea over time was taken up by all of the manufacturers in the US and made them utterly ubiquitous.

And then there is the Canadian versions. Many of which had alloy heads.

I had never heard of the 255.  V860, 221 and 239  are the ones I knew about. So many variations,, I wonder what was more numeric, the sidevalve V8 in all its form or small block Chev? I guess the Chev but there was a LOT of sidevalves, for the diehards they won the war!!  Though Jeep freaks say the same about the Jeep!

How many ci is the V860, about 160? What were they used in besides Ford Pilots? Vedettes too?



#131 timbo

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 22:13

Bill Hemmings, Elfin MR8.

012_zpsd7396bcd.jpg

#132 fredeuce

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 23:54

Lee, The Canadian versions are essentially the same as the USA version. As for the Alloy heads all USA version had both aluminium and cast iron heads available.

 

The Pilot was a UK produced car after the war and used the 221 ci engine not the V8-60.

 

The V8-60 was 136 ci. About the same size as an early Holden grey motor. These were available as an econo engine in across the Ford range from 1937-40. They were also used in Europe and particularly the Matfords of the late 30's. This company was Ford France after the takeover of Mathis by Ford in 1934. Postwar Ford produced a Ford Vedette which sported the little v8-60. In 1954 Simca bought Ford France and continued to sell these cars as Simca Vedettes . The car we know as the Simca Vedette was actually designed by Ford France before Simca came along but they rebadged it and marketed it as a Simca but in some parts of Europe it was sold as a Ford . These cars continued in production into the early 60's. In Brazil they built an overhead valve version of this engine which continued in production up to the late 60's.



#133 Ray Bell

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 23:58

Originally posed by Lee Nicolle
.....How many ci is the V860, about 160? What were they used in besides Ford Pilots? Vedettes too?


Strictly speaking, the V8/60 was a US engine, but its genesis as far as I can recall was:

Made in England so there was a V8 that didn't break the bank with taxation levels. This was about 1936, IIRC, and the capacity was around 2250cc.

The plans then went to France where Ford France changed a few things and built their own. This became the Vedette engine at about 2350cc.

Then they were built in the US.

The most interesting history is of the side valve Ford V8s built in France. The Ford France business was sold to Simca, then in turn Simca was absorbed by Chrysler. In the early sixties they decided the Vedette was too old for Europe and sent everything to South America where eventually they adopted Ardun heads, took the porting out of the block and enlarged it to 2500cc.

In the meantime, their production of the larger side valve Ford V8s continued well into the 1960s to satisfy military contracts for trucks using them.

#134 fnqvmuch

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 03:15

4-vOX-5%253F%252011877960156_9bd9ed918e_

 

asked around various places and still would love to know what this was ...



#135 DanTra2858

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 06:36

This motor appears to be 4 valves per cylinder with water cooling, aeroplane engine?

#136 Ray Bell

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 07:29

Has to be aircraft...

Maybe an Hispano-Suiza?

#137 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 08:53

Bill Hemmings, Elfin MR8.

012_zpsd7396bcd.jpg

Aaaggh. Those bloody modern rocker covers. 2000s tech on a 70s car.

And why is it so common to invite trouble with crossfire. The leads zipped to the rollbar support. Really silly. I see this on Sprinters too. Modern leads leak less often,, but still often leak!



#138 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:00

That team did not always use those ugly covers,, this is 2012.DSCF3605.jpg



#139 Catalina Park

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:07

Probably got sick of the leaks from the boat motor.

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#140 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:07

Road race engines

Muscle Car Camaro Chev engine. The rag is very critical!

Repco in Matich?

351 Ford in my XE Falcon

Unusual view of engine just before it was fitted.

Muscle Car Torana V8

358 Chev Sports Sedan engine.

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Edited by Lee Nicolle, 12 December 2014 - 11:12.


#141 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:24

Classic Speedway V8s

350 Chev that I built. Bottom end was from a super sedan and the heads are ex VesKanda, Intake is ex my Sports Sedan

 

292 Ford. Quite quick and one carefull owner since late 60s.  The chassis and panels sat on the farm for over 30 years before being resurected. The wing is original! Being monstered by my Holden 6 powered car. Cars behind are 350 Chev and injected 360 Mopar with W2 heads

.

Dodgey!  318 Sawtooth. Replica built from the spare front axle! Driver and towcar are original from 79

.

LA Mopar. Phil Hereen replica built with input from Phil and his band of helpers from about 1971.

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Edited by Lee Nicolle, 12 December 2014 - 11:45.


#142 fnqvmuch

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:27

Has to be aircraft...

Maybe an Hispano-Suiza?

 

 

This motor appears to be 4 valves per cylinder with water cooling, aeroplane engine?

glad i'm not alone in seeing it as having 4 valves; for my money it's a OX-5 bis - based on being found amongst 2 Curtiss related archives - but strangely un-verifiable hitherto. 



#143 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:37

Road car engines.

It must be a V8, it says so. Landcruiser V8 Petrol

400M Ford Galaxie

its baby brother, 302 Cleveland . Aussie only.

FJ holden engine, quad Webered 308. And yes that was an FJ alongside.

253 Holden.

7 litre [428] manual Galaxie I had here for a while.

347 Ford I built.

Chrysler 300 engine,, the carby engine not the supercharged one. The owner has both!.

 

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Edited by Lee Nicolle, 12 December 2014 - 11:46.


#144 bradbury west

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 15:27

I saw this shot on the old Jalopy.com. HAMB site a while back. The caption suggested it was a Curtiss with alloy heads and 4v. Another shot was with it showing a  mystery?? engine in a biplane captioned Poss Curtiss OXX6. 4v. People were listed as Glenn Curtiss and Lievts, ?spelling, Park,  Goodier,  McLeary, Brereton, if that helps. I am happy to scan the aeroplane shot in a decent resolution  if someone wants to post it. I cannot make the system work.

IT was on p4432 on the old page system on jalopy. They reallocated space a while back with more page capacity, so the pages are approx. 2/3rds the original page ref.. a bit like TNF with the cutaway index....

Roger Lund



#145 fnqvmuch

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 21:59

thanks Roger - my HAMB post early this year;

http://flic.kr/p/j6BDJu

(a water-cooled pushrod V8 w/ 4 (?) over-head valves ... approximately 1914/5) 
Recently added to the SDASM archive photo stream - 742 views atm and yet no-one has identified it.
I've only found a reference to Curtiss developing but maybe not actually realising alloy heads, etc., for the OXX6 ... someone here able to solve a little mystery?

The San Diego Air - Space Museum digitised it as part of it's T C Macaulay collection  ( now had 1977 views ) and the same photo comes up on a Curtiss site from someone else's ...



#146 bradbury west

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 22:33

The shot of the engine in the aeroplane shows clearly what looks like a front mounted radiator.

Roger Lund