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Should FOTA/TEAMS boycott Bahrain GP 2011?


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Poll: Should FOTA/TEAMS boycott Bahrain GP?? (346 member(s) have cast votes)

Should FOTA/Teams/Sponsors boycott Bahrain GP??

  1. Yes- humanity grounds/Greedy Bernie/Logistics! (256 votes [73.99%])

    Percentage of vote: 73.99%

  2. Yes- F1 employees deserve their scheduled 'November' holiday with family! (38 votes [10.98%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.98%

  3. No- F1 season will be better with Bahrain Race!! (52 votes [15.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.03%

Can teams be forced to race by the FIA?

  1. Yes- teams have no say! (99 votes [28.61%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.61%

  2. No- teams can decide not to race on various grounds! (247 votes [71.39%])

    Percentage of vote: 71.39%

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#51 Wi000

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 14:34

The only, and I mean ONLY reason that an F1 race should not take place is on safety grounds. If the safety of F1 drivers and crew cannot be guaranteed, then the race shouldn't take place.

Sport and politics don't mix.

Exactly my position.
Really I don't mind if they have a race there or not but it should be for the right reason and that's safety of all involved, clearly the Bahraini were able to convince 26 WMSC members that they can guarantee safety so it goes ahead (for now).

It all seems like a lot of bother over nothing. Will the teams and drivers be safe? If so then they must race. Teams and drivers can't decide on an ad-hoc basis as to which races they will and won't compete in.

I agree but you can't make teams or people go, so those refusing to race in Bahrain will have to accept the (financial & sporting) consequences of that decision as well.

Edited by Wi000, 04 June 2011 - 14:46.


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#52 muramasa

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 14:43

The only, and I mean ONLY reason that an F1 race should not take place is on safety grounds. If the safety of F1 drivers and crew cannot be guaranteed, then the race shouldn't take place.

Sport and politics don't mix. It's crap that the people of Bahrain have such a raw deal, but boycotting the race for that, would not change the situation. If anything, it would force the government to crack down on protesters even more than they are now. I'm afraid that the people of Bahrain cannot count on the West to help them in any way or form...it's entirely on their own shoulders to get rid of the ruling elite.


Cannot agree more. What should happen to Bahrain is a sensible matter, of course change for freedom and democracy is desirable, but in the process it seems inevitable that lot of blood will be shed. I want freer world but, can I take responsibility for those blood? I cant. Iinstigating "freedom" in front of PC screen at safe place is easy thing to do.

F1 shouldnt go there because F1 circus is an easy and effective target, providing opportunity and excuse for some violent people to attack and appeal, and for regime to further crack down on people and strengthen "security".

If talk about embarrasment, just announce already that F1 withdraw from Bahrain or will not return there because there's grave safety concern due to insecurity or sth like that, that would be enough of an embarrassment.

#53 MaxScelerate

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 15:13

It all seems like a lot of bother over nothing. Will the teams and drivers be safe? If so then they must race. Teams and drivers can't decide on an ad-hoc basis as to which races they will and won't compete in. There are human rights issues with many countries that host F1 races. Be it China or perhaps some teams might take issue with even the UK! What about America?
...

Actually, the problem *is* different. The fact that the firemen, the flagmen, the burqa-clad pit Girls, the waitresses and stewards, the ticket officers, the broom sweepers, etc. might very well need to be clobbered all the way to the track so the race could go on makes the racing event an important, if not central, piece of the whole political conflict.

#54 Watkins74

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 15:14

I don't quite understand all this admiration of Webber. I don't see where he said he isn't going to Bahrain. Words are easy but actions are what display your level of belief.

#55 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 15:32

I don't quite understand all this admiration of Webber. I don't see where he said he isn't going to Bahrain. Words are easy but actions are what display your level of belief.

He has at least been prepared to be quoted "on the record": apart from Damon Hill, I don't see any other well-known names in the sport being identified with this publically. Not yet anyway. Even Damon seems to have been quoted in a personal capacity, rather than on behalf of the BRDC. The teams are all hiding behind anonymous quotes and "sources close to ..."

#56 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 15:38

To be fair to them I'll give them a bit more time. There's no need to go public and create problems for yourself before the vote was decided, especially when people who were against it were making their views known to those that mattered.

Though I expect FOTA mania once the working week starts.

#57 Sakae

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:11

FIA reinstates Bahrain Grand Prix -
http://www.autosport...rt.php/id/91955

Team to 'discuss' Bahrain decision- Teams may boycott race-
http://planetf1.com/...ace-In-Bahrain-

Failing The Fans And India
http://planetf1.com/...-Fans-And-India

Webber critical of Bahrain decision
http://www.autosport...rt.php/id/91981

'Red Bull has been singled out by protestors, with almost 400,000 signing an online petition already'
http://en.espnf1.com...html?CMP=chrome

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Personally, I don't get it!
-A scheduled race has missed the boat because of internal problems in that country.
-F1 moved on and had some terrific races so far this season, with all going as planned.
-Then Bernie decides that Bahrain must return.... in place of Indian GP!
-This p!$$es a lot of Fans who were preparing for that event, not even counting backlash on humanitarian grounds.

-Bernie & co are still to explain why Bahrain GP is so important that it must be raced in 2011... even if it has to shove another countries race aside??
No logic, No sense. If I missed the boat, I doubt Bernie would arrange another one for me.... unless I pay him loads of money.

So is it all about money, or Bernie genuinely believes Bahrain is so important that it can't wait till 2012, since it missed the event on it's own accord/regime!

I am not saying that Bahrain shouldn't be on the calender... but what was the rush to reinstate it in 2011 itself....??

PS- I can just imagine the chaos if Bahrain was replacing the British or the German GP!! ):

You are getting in your political agenda, and sport should ignore it, or people who propagating it. The race should not go ahead for rationale put forth by Ross Brawn. Personnaly I do not need to see that race, if it is at the account of people who should be resting instead, or getting ready for January.

#58 JimmyStew

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:16

"When people in a country are being hurt, the issues are bigger than sport. Let's hope the right decision is made.." -Mark Webber (Twitter account)


Thanks, Faaz. You got there before me.

I was referring to the fact that Webber has the balls not only to recognise that there is a moral issue here that goes far beyond the narrow self-interests of a particular sport and the window-dressing opportunity it offers to an oppressive regime, but to state his position, clearly and unambiguously. Hope that makes my previous post less "meaningly" (lovely word, by the way, Ali_G!)

Edited by JimmyStew, 04 June 2011 - 16:19.


#59 Unbiased

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:21

Any team boycotting Bahrain should also boycot China and Brazil for similar reasons, i.e. their government systematically arresting, torturing, keeping indefinitely in prison, murdering people who oppose the government, which they do in a much bigger scale than Bahrain wished it could.

And anyone who accepts China and Brazil and not Bahrein is a hypocrite with cheap excuses why it is oh so different, simple.

I was referring to the fact that Webber has the balls not only to recognise that there is a moral issue


And he had no problem going to China while Tibetan monks were being murdered or to Brazil were dissidents were being excecuted while he was drinking champagne.

Edited by Unbiased, 04 June 2011 - 16:23.


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#60 JimmyStew

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:22

Webber on the Barhain GP:
"In my personal opinion, the sport should have taken a much firmer stance earlier this year rather than constantly delaying its decision in hope of being able to re-schedule it in 2011. It would have sent a very clear message about F1's position on something as fundamental as human rights and how it deals with moral issues. It's obvious that the parties involved have struggled to reach a decision but sadly I feel that they still haven't made the right one. Like it or not, F1 and sport in general isn't above having a social responsibility and conscience. I hope F1 is able to return to Bahrain eventually but now isn't the right time.

"As a competitor I do not feel at all comfortable going there to compete in an event when, despite reassurances to the contrary, it seems inevitable that it will cause more tension for the people of that country. I don't understand why my sport wishes to place itself in a position to be a catalyst for that."

At last, someone with a conscience and an opinion!


Thanks to you, too, Victor, for clarifying the point. The man is a diamond. Mark Webber, that is.

#61 FSA

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:23

Have to say. It's kind of shocking that Webber is the only driver (So far that I've read about) to react to this publicly. Of course they have contracts and they're just employees of their teams and the corporate sponsors who pay their salaries and all that, but no-one is stopping them from speaking their minds on an issue like this. And if they're not going to at least talk about something that involves brutality towards human beings then what does that say about them as role models. I'm a bit puzzled to be honest.



#62 Anssi

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:23

I don't know but I do know that there is a limit to how many F1 races I will watch per year. I think I am on the edge of starting to skip watching some F1 races.

#63 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:24

Two, or in this case three, wrongs don't make a right.

#64 JimmyStew

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:36

Any team boycotting Bahrain should also boycot China and Brazil for similar reasons, i.e. their government systematically arresting, torturing, keeping indefinitely in prison, murdering people who oppose the government, which they do in a much bigger scale than Bahrain wished it could.

And anyone who accepts China and Brazil and not Bahrein is a hypocrite with cheap excuses why it is oh so different, simple.



And he had no problem going to China while Tibetan monks were being murdered or to Brazil were dissidents were being excecuted while he was drinking champagne.


A fair point, Unbiased, if rather forcefully expressed, but I don't think that it substantially detracts from the force of Webber's point. And who else that's involved in the sport has so far had the balls to stand up and be counted? Following the logic of your argument would mean that no one who has previously participated in any grands prix in countries with dubious regimes and dodgy human rights records would raise any objections, ever, to a situation such as this one. I'm not convinced that's a desirable situation.

#65 JimmyStew

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 16:38

I don't know but I do know that there is a limit to how many F1 races I will watch per year. I think I am on the edge of starting to skip watching some F1 races.


Whoa! Easy, tiger!

#66 Menace

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 17:09

Mark Webber! :up: Respect!

I hope more drivers speak up.

#67 BinaryDad

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 17:54

And who else that's involved in the sport has so far had the balls to stand up and be counted?


When the big mouthed Aussie picks up a placard and joins the protesters, then he'll be standing up to be counted. Until then, he's just some rich bloke with an opinion who's making some headlines.

It's easy to say "we should take a stand" when that involves sitting on your backside at home and taking what is most likely a small financial hit. There's no balls needed for angering or going against the likes of Bernie, when all you're doing is stating a differing opinion. Just like it's easy for me to criticize Webber from behind a keyboard. No balls needed.

If anybody can do anything to stop F1 from racing in Bahrain, it's us. Lobby your local TV sender and the companies running TV adverts during the race. Tell them you refuse to watch such a farce, and that their involvement means to you, that they support the oppression of human rights in the name of making a profit.

Because while I believe F1 should involve itself in any sort of political struggle in the real world for any reason, my own feelings on the situation are quite clear.

Edited by BinaryDad, 04 June 2011 - 18:05.


#68 JimmyStew

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 18:03

When the big mouthed Aussie picks up a placard and joins the protesters, then he'll be standing up to be counted. Until then, he's just some rich bloke with an opinion who's making some headlines.



Er - sorry, I missed the bit where you named anyone else involved in F1 who has yet spoken out about the decision to go ahead with this race. Cynical comments are easy.

#69 bourbon

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 18:12

Yes, they should stand together and refuse to go (quite frankly I don't think the powers that be would be all that upset about it). It is true that other countries make both the F1 schedule and Amnesty International's human right's infractions list. But timing is important and in a year when Bahrain is headlining the issue, it would behoove teams to opt out. There are two sides to every story, but the bottom line is that atrocities on all sides have to stop. Until the situation improves, racing should not take place for political, humanitarian and safety reasons.

#70 Clatter

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 18:23

Er - sorry, I missed the bit where you named anyone else involved in F1 who has yet spoken out about the decision to go ahead with this race. Cynical comments are easy.


Well actions do speak louder than words. There is little point speaking out if you then follow the circus and attend the race.

#71 Clatter

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 18:56

I havent seen any comments from the organisers on whether India wanted the race rescheduled, but can we make the leap and assume they are behind schedule with getting the track ready? What will happen if the Bahrain gets cancelled from it's rescheduled slot? Will the move the Indian race back to it's origional date?

Are tickets on sale for the Indian GP? If so then little or no thought can have been paid to those who have made arrangements for the scheduled date.

#72 Gyan

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 18:57

I'm sure someone has made him aware of that, but they aren't going to make a decision based on a weather report 6 months prior to the race going ahead.


It's always very foggy and cold during the winters in the city mate. The race shouldn't start at a time during which there will be a lot of fog. It's mostly till 10. However, flights can and will be disrupted and so will trains.

#73 Gyan

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 19:02

I havent seen any comments from the organisers on whether India wanted the race rescheduled, but can we make the leap and assume they are behind schedule with getting the track ready? What will happen if the Bahrain gets cancelled from it's rescheduled slot? Will the move the Indian race back to it's origional date?

Are tickets on sale for the Indian GP? If so then little or no thought can have been paid to those who have made arrangements for the scheduled date.


They have been quiet on it. The most recent of the track is this.

Posted Image

Work is certainly going on but I do think that they are a bit behind schedule. The main grandstand looks ready but the pit buildings still need work. The track was in the process of getting laid but will be laid after the monsoon only which is September now that the race has been rescheduled. No tickets have been sold as of yet. I do think the organisers wanted the race rescheduled or at least would have hinted that to Bernie. Not way behind but surely a little bit behind. Why I say this is because even though the other stands are temporary you still need to make slip/access roads, put the fences around, marshall outposts, wiring systems etc.

#74 engel

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 19:18

If India didn't want the race moved then Mallya wouldn't be voting to have Bahrain replace India in the calendar ;)

#75 Fastcake

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 19:20

I havent seen any comments from the organisers on whether India wanted the race rescheduled, but can we make the leap and assume they are behind schedule with getting the track ready? What will happen if the Bahrain gets cancelled from it's rescheduled slot? Will the move the Indian race back to it's origional date?

Are tickets on sale for the Indian GP? If so then little or no thought can have been paid to those who have made arrangements for the scheduled date.


Well they couldn't just move the dates this close to the race, so this must of been done with the approval of the Indian organisers. I wouldn't be surprised if, separately, the organisers had been appealing for a date postponement, and the Bahrain situation gave them a good excuse to change the date.

#76 Chezrome

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 20:25

It all seems like a lot of bother over nothing. Will the teams and drivers be safe? If so then they must race. Teams and drivers can't decide on an ad-hoc basis as to which races they will and won't compete in. There are human rights issues with many countries that host F1 races. Be it China or perhaps some teams might take issue with even the UK! What about America? This is a country that openly tortures innocent people and keeps them locked up all in the name of 'war against terror'. It is a country so barbaric that it kills it's own citizens under the pretence of justice. Now you may not agree with me but many in the pitlane would, so should teams be allowed to choose if they race in the US if it comes back on the calendar?

If the teams and drivers are safe then they should race.


I don't agree. If Webber doesn't want to race, he doesn't want to race. I don't know if F1 should go or not to Bahrein, but I admire that he dares to disagree. He has gone up a notch in my book.





#77 MaxScelerate

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 20:45

And anyone who accepts China and Brazil and not Bahrein is a hypocrite with cheap excuses why it is oh so different, simple
...
And he had no problem going to China while Tibetan monks were being murdered or to Brazil were dissidents were being excecuted while he was drinking champagne.

When there are reports that the Chinese go and arrest and beat up "Tibetan monks" so they go to work at the circuit, I'll oppose China on matters of Grand Prix Racing.

Edited by MaxScelerate, 04 June 2011 - 20:46.


#78 sharo

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 20:51

Don't think the race should be held on several grounds - from humanitarian to safety. Besides that race in the desert in front of almost empty stands is not attractive.

Added:
China is totally different matter in comparison with Bahrain. The latter being almost a medieval monarchy, while in China we have country with one and a half billion people, dynamic growth and planned and gradual transition of the economic base to capitalist, although paradoxically lead by a communist party. :)
Try to imagine the global disaster if there is a sudden and chaotic change there, like it happened in my country with only 8 million population - still ruined and poor country after 20 years.

Edited by sharo, 04 June 2011 - 20:59.


#79 bourbon

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 20:56

He has at least been prepared to be quoted "on the record": apart from Damon Hill, I don't see any other well-known names in the sport being identified with this publically. Not yet anyway. Even Damon seems to have been quoted in a personal capacity, rather than on behalf of the BRDC. The teams are all hiding behind anonymous quotes and "sources close to ..."


Nearly every driver on the grid was quoted about the issue the FIRST time Bahrain was kicked from the schedule. They all thought it was a good thing. Why do you figure they have changed their minds? Teams have already voiced their dissention but Bahrain was put on the schedule anyway. So now it is up to the teams to cohesively make a decision and stand by it. I'm sure all the drivers feel the same as they did a couple of months ago and can speak again if they wish, as Webber has, but I don't see it as necessary. To accuse any of those in F1 of "hiding" is ridiculous. In general if you support freedom that includes speech. The freedom to speak encompasses the freedom not to speak - individuals and groups (including F1 teams) should not be condemned for either, specifically or generally. So if F1 peeps want to talk on political topics they will, if not they won't and either is absolutely fine. They have said they will meet and try to stand united as a front in their decision, so just have a little patience, sunshine.

Edited by bourbon, 04 June 2011 - 21:08.


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#80 Sakae

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 21:29

Er - sorry, I missed the bit where you named anyone else involved in F1 who has yet spoken out about the decision to go ahead with this race. Cynical comments are easy.

Appropriately FOTA said they will talk about it, and speak with one voice now when FiA has nominated the race to be re-instated.

#81 KateLM

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 21:42

Nearly every driver on the grid was quoted about the issue the FIRST time Bahrain was kicked from the schedule. They all thought it was a good thing. Why do you figure they have changed their minds? Teams have already voiced their dissention but Bahrain was put on the schedule anyway. So now it is up to the teams to cohesively make a decision and stand by it. I'm sure all the drivers feel the same as they did a couple of months ago and can speak again if they wish, as Webber has, but I don't see it as necessary. To accuse any of those in F1 of "hiding" is ridiculous. In general if you support freedom that includes speech. The freedom to speak encompasses the freedom not to speak - individuals and groups (including F1 teams) should not be condemned for either, specifically or generally. So if F1 peeps want to talk on political topics they will, if not they won't and either is absolutely fine. They have said they will meet and try to stand united as a front in their decision, so just have a little patience, sunshine.

I'm not saying I disagree with you bourbon but you said it yourself - they didn't speak up until the race was postponed. Until then the ambivalence was deafening. I'm not criticizing them because I imagine its quite a difficult position to be in (especially for the McLaren drivers), but at the same time they don't really get brownie points for it.

Max Mosley has written a piece which is now on the Telegraph website about the difference between going to Bahrain and going to China, and makes some very good points in it. The race in China is a sporting event held in a country where admittedly some unsavoury things happen. But the rulers in Bahrain are actively using the Grand Prix to try and promote the image that everything is fine and back to normal, which is at odds with what a lot of NGOs are telling us. And the GP returning will most likely trigger a crackdown on protesters before it arrives. China has its problems yes, but F1 is not actively making those problems worse.

#82 Dudley

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 22:01

Similarly, I might say I won't watch the race on ethics grounds, but I know I will still watch it anyways.


I won't.

#83 Disgrace

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 22:47

It all seems like a lot of bother over nothing. Will the teams and drivers be safe? If so then they must race. Teams and drivers can't decide on an ad-hoc basis as to which races they will and won't compete in. There are human rights issues with many countries that host F1 races. Be it China or perhaps some teams might take issue with even the UK! What about America? This is a country that openly tortures innocent people and keeps them locked up all in the name of 'war against terror'. It is a country so barbaric that it kills it's own citizens under the pretence of justice. Now you may not agree with me but many in the pitlane would, so should teams be allowed to choose if they race in the US if it comes back on the calendar?

If the teams and drivers are safe then they should race.


I don't really want to agree with this viewpoint but there is considerable sense behind it. My opinion is that the teams and drivers will be safe because it's the government (the ruling family who is also promoter of the grand prix) committing the crimes against its people that is disgusting those around the world. It's not a terrorist rebellion, nor is the country a breeding ground for such people generally.

One issue is whether the people use it as a time and a place for a resurrection in its protests.

My main gripe is what the government along with the Saudi police will do to keep them quiet whilst the F1 circus is there, but then this makes only superficial difference to what is already ongoing and what we've all seen.

Although my opinion of Webber has also risen due to his speaking of his mind, I'm not sure even the Bahrain people know what want. Comments from his blog:

I’m Bahraini and well said ! please do be part of that !! they’ll never stop human rights violation against my people


Well said mark , I am a Bahraini and I don’t think it was the right decision to make from the FIA I think they reconsider this , although F1 could get bahrain a high reputation among the world , but it is not the right time .


Mark, dont mix politics in sports, people like you who are well known should support uniting and rejoicing. Instead, u challenge the decision to bring back the F1 in Bahrain. You have been misinformed about the situation in Bahrain, i think you should appologize to us Bahrainis for such statements.
Even Navy Pillay, thr head of Human Rights in the UN appologized and officially stated that she was misinformed and that info she received about Bahrain are incorrect.
I hope you come here and see for urself that this is nothing more than anti bahranis trying to bahrain. its a shame that u said what u said becuz u have been here urself and u saw bahrain for urself, u saw all our smiles and happinness. u saw the faces of the true bahrainis… im shocked that u believe media propaganda.
i think we deserve an apology, even the head of human rights in UN apologized. truth prevails my friend.


:well:

#84 goldenboy

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 22:54

When the big mouthed Aussie picks up a placard and joins the protesters, then he'll be standing up to be counted. Until then, he's just some rich bloke with an opinion who's making some headlines.

It's easy to say "we should take a stand" when that involves sitting on your backside at home and taking what is most likely a small financial hit. There's no balls needed for angering or going against the likes of Bernie, when all you're doing is stating a differing opinion. Just like it's easy for me to criticize Webber from behind a keyboard. No balls needed.

quite an unfair thing to say about webber giving what seems his own passionate view on the subject. You say the only way "the big mouthed aussie" can make a stand is to what, fly to bahrain and join in a protest where people are being shot in the head while doing so???? And until he does that he is just a rich bloke with an opinion with no balls?

Please.

Although I don't think it's worthy of hero worship, it's certainly not worthy of what you have accused him of.





#85 Watkins74

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 23:51

In my opinion it's unlikely FOTA will flat out boycott Bahrain. Bahrain does after all own 30% of McLaren, I can't see Whitmarsh staging war against his shareholders.

Maybe McLaren will boycott themselves?

It is funny how this board is saturated with McLaren avatars but in this thread they seem to be missing. Wonder why?;)

Edited by Watkins74, 05 June 2011 - 02:57.


#86 Nivra

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 02:30

Max may be a jerk, but he got some valid points & explaination on difference between Bahrain & other similar countries... & why F1/FIA/Bernie is being generally stupid!!!


Mosley warns Bahrain decision could haunt F1
http://en.espnf1.com...html?CMP=chrome

"Surely the line has to be drawn when a sporting event is not mere entertainment in a less-than-perfect country, but is being used by an oppressive regime to camouflage its actions."

"If Formula One allows itself to be used in this way in Bahrain, it will share the regime's guilt as surely as if it went out and helped brutalise unarmed protesters."

"Doctors and nurses who treated the injured were themselves arrested and imprisoned. When these measures failed to crush the protests, the Bahrain government called in troops from neighbouring Saudi Arabia to crush all opposition with naked force.

"Having carried out these horrific acts, the Bahrain government wants to clean up its image. That's where the Grand Prix comes in. By running the race they hope to show the world the troubles were just a small, temporary difficulty and everything is now back to normal.

"By agreeing to race there, Formula One becomes complicit in what has happened. It becomes one of the Bahrain government's instruments of repression. The decision to hold the race is a mistake which will not be forgotten and, if not reversed, will eventually cost Formula One dear."

#87 Supersleeper

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 02:33

When the big mouthed Aussie picks up a placard and joins the protesters, then he'll be standing up to be counted. Until then, he's just some rich bloke with an opinion who's making some headlines.

Well you and your Farrah Fawcett haircut should head back to the 1970's where you belong, as you'll find that all of the protests that have come into effect in that region have had one very powerful driving force behind them all - "social media" - the worlds biggest and most accessible "placards". What form did Mark Webber choose to make his voice hear - down at the pub, on the golf course with a couple of mates, off on a jog with his dogs? - no - "social media" - twitter to be exact. So there's 14,000 people he made his feelings know to straight away. It's in the mainstream media now, so there's a couple of million at least.

If anybody can do anything to stop F1 from racing in Bahrain, it's us. Lobby your local TV sender and the companies running TV adverts during the race. Tell them you refuse to watch such a farce, and that their involvement means to you, that they support the oppression of human rights in the name of making a profit.

So as not to be a total hypocrite, and to give some of us a bit of a heads up, can you post the letters that you've sent to your local TV station and those in the media highlighting the cause and adding your weight to the issue?

Criticise someone for doing something and then do nothing yourself? :blush:


#88 Nivra

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 02:42

My main gripe is what the government along with the Saudi police will do to keep them quiet whilst the F1 circus is there, but then this makes only superficial difference to what is already ongoing and what we've all seen.


Thats exactly the fear everyone has regarding holding this stupid race there!

People who support the FIA decision don't realize the amount of suppression that'll take place by the government, the police & the Saudi Army on F1 Race-Weekend.
Generally, for 3 days.... the people will get extra-oppressed by security & threat, because some loony decided the race must go on... & so that a few million bucks can be made in the process!

PS- the sad part is, while F1 isn't political... it might just become the reason on October 30th for a few more suppression & arrest of Bahraini people... while the race is on & being watched by millions of people sitting on their couch. :down:

#89 y2cwr2005

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 02:52

This is ridiulous, if teams can decide not to race on the idea of safety grounds back at Indianapolis. I fully expect this race to be boycotted, if the team's even decide to take equipment to Bahrain. Logisticaly and politically, this GP has no place on the 2011 calendar, it just doesn't make sense.

#90 faaaz

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 05:04

I wonder if anyone truly understands what the hell is going on in Bahrain anyway? I'm honest enough to admit that I don't, so I'm not not going to form an opinion. You have to be consistent with these things..there are human rights violations all around the world. Australia- refuges, American - Guantanamo , China, India..list goes on. At what stage does F1 take a stance and say "No". As I said, I don't understand the situation in Bahrain, but it sounds like it would directly affect F1. Where is the moral ground?

#91 Nivra

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 06:27

I wonder if anyone truly understands what the hell is going on in Bahrain anyway? I'm honest enough to admit that I don't, so I'm not not going to form an opinion. You have to be consistent with these things..there are human rights violations all around the world. Australia- refuges, American - Guantanamo , China, India..list goes on. At what stage does F1 take a stance and say "No". As I said, I don't understand the situation in Bahrain, but it sounds like it would directly affect F1. Where is the moral ground?

There in lies the difference!

The Bahrain race got cancelled because the country was in turmoil and couldn't guarantee the safety of anyone... let alone their citizens.

Australia, China, India didn't get cancelled.

The point is, someone went to great length to restore this race for no apparent reason... so much so that they bumped another race down the calender!! What people want to know is why couldn't it just be left alone and decided on for the 2012 calender.

Like I said, if someone has missed the train for personal reason... why should other suffer by bringing back that train to get him!! You see, Bahrain missed the 2011 train, so should have caught the 2012 one.... instead, Bernie forces the train to return, apparently for loads of money & creating a lot of issues!

You get the difference. Bahrain race was not an urgency, it got made into one. :mad:

PS- the issue is not a moral one... but why it made into a moral one for millions around the world by some d!cks in the FIA???

Edited by Nivra, 05 June 2011 - 06:34.


#92 RC127

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 06:34

I'm sure someone has made him aware of that, but they aren't going to make a decision based on a weather report 6 months prior to the race going ahead.


http://news.bbc.co.u...sia/8469379.stm

Yes, "Delhi Fog" is a known irritant in the airline scheduling industry - it is commonplace for multiple flight cancellations at that time, as referenced in the above linked article. Not exactly conducive to the world's media, team personnel and drivers arriving for the race.

Is Bernie trying to sabotage this race?

What about turning his back on the prime time Brazil season finale? Does Bernie also think Vettel is going to wrap things up well before then?

What if the upcoming ban on off-throttle exhaust blown diffuser begins to mix the grid order up in qualifying? Then Vettel will be a less formidable threat, since RBR are nothing special in the races, and Vettel has a had a lot of luck augmenting his undoubted skill this season thus far.

#93 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:15

In my opinion it's unlikely FOTA will flat out boycott Bahrain. Bahrain does after all own 30% of McLaren, I can't see Whitmarsh staging war against his shareholders.


Maybe he should man-up and do it anyway.

#94 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:20

While that's true I don't think Mclaren with the transition of the Mercedes shares going on and starting up it's Automotive division will be happy to piss off a major shareholder or so to say kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
I can't see them voting for a FOTA boycott which I should add is not a bad thing imo.


It is also very possible that if the UN were to place Bahrain under sanctions the 'goose that lays the golden eggs' wouldn't be able to do anything with those shares anyway.

#95 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:28

Weber is correct to protest.

He better watch it though because the Bahrainis shoot people who protest.

#96 muramasa

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:34

I wonder if anyone truly understands what the hell is going on in Bahrain anyway? I'm honest enough to admit that I don't, so I'm not not going to form an opinion. You have to be consistent with these things..there are human rights violations all around the world. Australia- refuges, American - Guantanamo , China, India..list goes on. At what stage does F1 take a stance and say "No". As I said, I don't understand the situation in Bahrain, but it sounds like it would directly affect F1. Where is the moral ground?

Indeed. Those who're brandishing justice should rise up and stand together in order to withdraw all "foreigners" from South Africa, Australia, north&sounth America, etc etc, get them back to their "home" soils and return these lands to "natives". That it happened many hundreds years ago doesnt matter. Also they should make actions to boycott NATO countries for killing Libyan citizens.

We of course all hope for better world, but all we can do is keep paying attention and be ready to lend a helping hand to those who'll have to suffer. Instigating overthrow of regime in front of PC is easy thing to do. But can you take responsibility for blood?

F1 shouldnt go to Bahrain purely because there is grave concern for safety.

#97 R2D2

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:47

It certainly gives the Bahraini people a nice date with worldwide TV cameras around and a few journalists. There'll probably be a 20 mile exclusion zone around the track, but if the organisers want full grandstands, can they really vet all of the spectators?

#98 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:49

Indeed. Those who're brandishing justice should rise up and stand together in order to withdraw all "foreigners" from South Africa, Australia, north&sounth America, etc etc, get them back to their "home" soils and return these lands to "natives". That it happened many hundreds years ago doesnt matter. Also they should make actions to boycott NATO countries for killing Libyan citizens.

We of course all hope for better world, but all we can do is keep paying attention and be ready to lend a helping hand to those who'll have to suffer. Instigating overthrow of regime in front of PC is easy thing to do. But can you take responsibility for blood?

F1 shouldnt go to Bahrain purely because there is grave concern for safety.


An excellent argument for doing nothing.

#99 SimMaker

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:52

Have any groups from Bahrain said they want the GP banned?

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#100 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:57

Have any groups from Bahrain said they want the GP banned?


Again, what happens when you protest something in Bahrain?