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Should FOTA/TEAMS boycott Bahrain GP 2011?


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Poll: Should FOTA/TEAMS boycott Bahrain GP?? (346 member(s) have cast votes)

Should FOTA/Teams/Sponsors boycott Bahrain GP??

  1. Yes- humanity grounds/Greedy Bernie/Logistics! (256 votes [73.99%])

    Percentage of vote: 73.99%

  2. Yes- F1 employees deserve their scheduled 'November' holiday with family! (38 votes [10.98%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.98%

  3. No- F1 season will be better with Bahrain Race!! (52 votes [15.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.03%

Can teams be forced to race by the FIA?

  1. Yes- teams have no say! (99 votes [28.61%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.61%

  2. No- teams can decide not to race on various grounds! (247 votes [71.39%])

    Percentage of vote: 71.39%

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#101 Nick Planas

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:02

For once, I find myself in general agreement with Max Mosely's comments.

There is something distinctly unnerving about this whole episode - I'm totally convinced no-one on here is getting the whole picture - I know I'm not, but I feel very uneasy about this event going ahead. I just hope that, if it does take place, the whole thing is over with without any serious issues, otherwise I fear for the future of the sport I love [spot the delusional use of the word "Sport"]

Edited by Nick Planas, 05 June 2011 - 09:02.


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#102 muramasa

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:03

An excellent argument for doing nothing.

It's sad to see people like you who refuse to talk and undertand others' view.

I actually share and agree with your whole opinion too (who the hell thinks nothing should be done about it and think peaceful protest being shot at as no problem?), but just have different view which I explained. but people like you can only give back response like this manner. Sad.

#103 SimMaker

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:07

Again, what happens when you protest something in Bahrain?



I've only read a quote from one opposition group protestor, and the quote claims they Want the GP as to lose it is going to take work away from taxi drivers, hotels, restaurants, tourism etc.

Are all of you demanding that the race be banned considering the law of unintended consequences?

What if you get it banned, and the ordinary people there lose out on their jobs and livelyhoods. What if in a big Huza!, F1 says they wont go....and then after it dies down, the worlds eye turns away...what happens then?

And my final question, is anyone here in full possession of the facts?

#104 jeze

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:28

For Human Rights reasons? No.

For greedy Bernie reasons? YES JUST DO IT!

#105 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:39

It's sad to see people like you who refuse to talk and undertand others' view.

I actually share and agree with your whole opinion too (who the hell thinks nothing should be done about it and think peaceful protest being shot at as no problem?), but just have different view which I explained. but people like you can only give back response like this manner. Sad.


I understand others view, I just don't endorse them. Sad that you think I should.

I don't buy the argument that since there are human right abuses in other countries nothing should be done about human rights abuses in Bahrain. One hopes that F1 cancelled the race initially, not just because they couldn't race safely but because the government was killing people in the streets.



#106 Phucaigh

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:43

The Bahrain justice minister has said two doctors should be executed for killing protesters, both treated patients that were shot by government forces, unfortunately they died and the government is blaming them when they caused the deaths.
This is what we are dealing with, this is what Bernie and Co have not dealt with, $40 million is worth more to certain people in F1 than innocent lives who pay a price that cannot be counted.

Bahrain is a tiny country, F1 brings it great prestige. I think if the race goes ahead then all the teams should turn the whole event into a farce, it is quite easy to turn an event into a farce, like make really unreliable cars for qualifying so no flying lap is done, do installation during practice, all the cars do an Indy 2005 on it.
Now that would emabarrass the head brass who run F1 but the teams will be told they have a contract and they must follow it or pay, I think the teams could use the threat of turning the whole event into a farce which embarrasses Bahrain Bernie and the FIA as a way of preventing the event going ahead.
They need to do something, if they are made go then I think the seeds will be sown and there will be a breakaway championship in 2013, Montezemolo has not ruled this out and with the teams being disregarded when it came to the decision I think it could be a catalyst for such an event in 2013.
It shouldn't be upto Bernie or the FIA to tell the teams where they must race, the teams are the sport, they are the public face of F1 and imposing decisions on them will lead to resentment.
Am I wrong in saying their opinion was not taken into account?

#107 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:44

I've only read a quote from one opposition group protestor, and the quote claims they Want the GP as to lose it is going to take work away from taxi drivers, hotels, restaurants, tourism etc.

Are all of you demanding that the race be banned considering the law of unintended consequences?

What if you get it banned, and the ordinary people there lose out on their jobs and livelyhoods. What if in a big Huza!, F1 says they wont go....and then after it dies down, the worlds eye turns away...what happens then?

And my final question, is anyone here in full possession of the facts?


I think the powers that be in Bahrain desperately want the race to go on for just that reason. To make the rest of the world forget they were shooting protesters in the streets. Nothing says ignore the man behind the curtain like the F1 circus coming to town.

I eagerly await the announcement of the Grand Prix of North Korea.

#108 muramasa

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:56

I understand others view, I just don't endorse them. Sad that you think I should.

When did I say you should "endorse"???

I thought the freedom and democracy is about discussing freely and responsibly and respecting others, which I'm practising now. I never forced anyone to do anything.

I don't buy the argument that since there are human right abuses in other countries nothing should be done about human rights abuses in Bahrain.

As far as i can see, there's NO ONE claiming like that. If anything, people are arguing any human rights are important.

One hopes that F1 cancelled the race initially, not just because they couldn't race safely but because the government was killing people in the streets.

And no one I believe thinks the latter reason is nuisance.

Also I think that they are trying to host the 2011 race, rather than (start from) assessing the situation and seeking the possibility first, is problematic and sth that's hard to accept.



#109 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:19

I wonder if anyone truly understands what the hell is going on in Bahrain anyway? I'm honest enough to admit that I don't, so I'm not not going to form an opinion. You have to be consistent with these things..there are human rights violations all around the world. Australia- refuges, American - Guantanamo , China, India..list goes on. At what stage does F1 take a stance and say "No". As I said, I don't understand the situation in Bahrain, but it sounds like it would directly affect F1. Where is the moral ground?

While hating to sound political the 'refugees' causing the problems in Australia are illegal imigrants. They ceased to be refugees by leaving the first country they landed in, usually Indonesia by paying to be taken to Australia, or any other countries they go too.

#110 mariner

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:19

What I do not understand is why the FIA ever made the decision to go back to Bahrain.

The Bahrain gov't cancelled the race claiming force majure and FOM returned the fee so there is no obvious legal obligation on FOM or the FIA to re-instate it.

The Bahrain race has been put on next years calendar so nobody is saying Bahrain cannot have a GP again due to percieved Human Rights abuses.

The race missed it's 2011 slot and rescheduling is very difficult so there was a perfect excuse to not re-instate it this year.

What the FIA have done by re-instating it is to insult just about everybody F1 relies on and place some of them in a potentially difficult position later in the year.
o
- India is hoilding its first GP and it has been told ( in effect) " your economic powerhouse of 1.2B people is less important to F1 than a small Gulf state with not much oil"

- The sponsors have been told " re-arrange your F1 marketing campaigns in India, a huge market for you, and be prepared to be cruxified by the media if you have your slogans at Bahrain and more abuse is reported , and if you leave the slogans off, expect a bad reaction from your Gulf state customers so it's lose,lose for you.

- The TV stations upon whose coverage everything else depends have been told to jerk your schedules around to suit a little Gulf state under the spotlight for torture and if you show the race expect strong condemation in the media and nasty interviews for your bosses.

Regardless of all the moral arguments how can the FIA be so commercially stupid as to walk itself into this situation?

#111 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:25

When did I say you should "endorse"???

I thought the freedom and democracy is about discussing freely and responsibly and respecting others, which I'm practising now. I never forced anyone to do anything.


As far as i can see, there's NO ONE claiming like that. If anything, people are arguing any human rights are important.


And no one I believe thinks the latter reason is nuisance.

Also I think that they are trying to host the 2011 race, rather than (start from) assessing the situation and seeking the possibility first, is problematic and sth that's hard to accept.


Freedom and democracy don't require that you respect someone's opinion just their right to have one. There are plenty of opinions that are not worthy of anyone's respect.

A number of people have argued that because other countries (NATO, South Africa, US ect) have human rights problems that it doesn't make sense that Bahrain should be singled out. That as long as it is safe to race there, it doesn't matter (for F1) that the people are safe to protest there.

#112 Cramadzy

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:29

The teams should definitely say no to racing in Bahrain. The kingdom is yet another example of elite rule, state capitalism gone wild. The middle east uprisings aren't just about the despotic regimes and the subsequent lack of any franchise for the citizens, they are also about money and the price of food which has been driven up relentlessly by the speculators ever since their obscenely enriching property bubble scam burst. The people in Bahrain are overtly oppressed and hungry and will have just cause to go wild with rage if the race does indeed take place. It won't be safe for anyone, fans, teams, or the citizens of the kingdom. Bernie really needs to think again. The only thing that has changed where the citizens of Bahrain are concerned is that they are even more aware of how oppressed and utterly powerless they are in the face of their ruling elite. Food prices are still rising, martial law remains in place, the military and police still follow orders from the same rulers and will still murder any protestors at will. It's no place for an F1 race.

#113 BinaryDad

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:32

Criticise someone for doing something and then do nothing yourself? :blush:


I know where I stand, and I know what I have done and will do. I don't have to prove anything to some non-entity behind a keyboard.

But then, I'm not mouthing off to the media and taking the moral high ground as if I'm some sort of bloody martyr.

Edited by BinaryDad, 05 June 2011 - 10:36.


#114 muramasa

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:51

Freedom and democracy don't require that you respect someone's opinion just their right to have one. There are plenty of opinions that are not worthy of anyone's respect.

OK, that mindset I dont accept because that's quite stubborn and unilateral attitude.

A number of people have argued that because other countries (NATO, South Africa, US ect) have human rights problems that it doesn't make sense that Bahrain should be singled out. That as long as it is safe to race there, it doesn't matter (for F1) that the people are safe to protest there.

Again, as far as I see, I cannot find anyone who's claiming like that. Unfortunately you just keep misreading others.

Sorry but you are stating to sound sophistry I'm afraid. What if I asked you in turn "do you disregard matters in other countries?"?

But anyway I've explained my opinion with this much sincerity and respect, as well as made clear that I do not disagree with you on the whole, so maybe I should stop here.


#115 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 11:10

OK, that mindset I dont accept because that's quite stubborn and unilateral attitude.


Again, as far as I see, I cannot find anyone who's claiming like that. Unfortunately you just keep misreading others.

Sorry but you are stating to sound sophistry I'm afraid. What if I asked you in turn "do you disregard matters in other countries?"?

But anyway I've explained my opinion with this much sincerity and respect, as well as made clear that I do not disagree with you on the whole, so maybe I should stop here.


OK here are a few:
"I has to be said though, why stop at Bahrain. Why not boycott all races where there is a dictatorial regime in place ?"

"Bring humanity to table and GPs at all NATO countries should be boycotted too, which is absurd."

"It all seems like a lot of bother over nothing. Will the teams and drivers be safe? If so then they must race. Teams and drivers can't decide on an ad-hoc basis as to which races they will and won't compete in. There are human rights issues with many countries that host F1 races. Be it China or perhaps some teams might take issue with even the UK! What about America? This is a country that openly tortures innocent people and keeps them locked up all in the name of 'war against terror'. It is a country so barbaric that it kills it's own citizens under the pretence of justice. Now you may not agree with me but many in the pitlane would, so should teams be allowed to choose if they race in the US if it comes back on the calendar? "

I think we may have a language or translation problem here.

Here are some opinions people hold. They have a right to hold those opinions but they are absurd opinions and the opinions deserve no respect. Now this is just my opinion, which according to you, you have to respect right?

The Twin Towers were demolished by George W Bush.
Elvis is alive and well in Flint, Michigan.
The world is ruled by an underground reptilian species.
The Easter Bunny sneaks into my house and leaves me candy.



#116 Sakae

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 11:23

Nearly every driver on the grid was quoted about the issue the FIRST time Bahrain was kicked from the schedule.

It was question of their safety. Now it is becoming also political in a sense that people start taking sides. If we apply some of those filtration criteria evenly, we should be boycotting almost all countries, including perhaps GB. This is a sport, and should remain so focused. More pressing issue is whether teams can manage that additional burden, and I find rather strange that very few are concerned about it.

Edited by Sakae, 05 June 2011 - 11:24.


#117 Nivra

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 11:32

What I do not understand is why the FIA ever made the decision to go back to Bahrain.

The Bahrain gov't cancelled the race claiming force majure and FOM returned the fee so there is no obvious legal obligation on FOM or the FIA to re-instate it.

The Bahrain race has been put on next years calendar so nobody is saying Bahrain cannot have a GP again due to percieved Human Rights abuses.

The race missed it's 2011 slot and rescheduling is very difficult so there was a perfect excuse to not re-instate it this year.

What the FIA have done by re-instating it is to insult just about everybody F1 relies on and place some of them in a potentially difficult position later in the year.

- India is hoilding its first GP and it has been told ( in effect) " your economic powerhouse of 1.2B people is less important to F1 than a small Gulf state with not much oil
"

- The sponsors have been told " re-arrange your F1 marketing campaigns in India, a huge market for you, and be prepared to be cruxified by the media if you have your slogans at Bahrain and more abuse is reported , and if you leave the slogans off, expect a bad reaction from your Gulf state customers so it's lose,lose for you.

- The TV stations upon whose coverage everything else depends have been told to jerk your schedules around to suit a little Gulf state under the spotlight for torture and if you show the race expect strong condemation in the media and nasty interviews for your bosses.

Regardless of all the moral arguments how can the FIA be so commercially stupid as to walk itself into this situation?

Exactly :up: :mad: :mad:

Some people who are arguing here don't even realize their own folly... or that of Bernie's & FIA's!!

Bahrain is just one tiny man's 'wicked-wish' to fill his pocket & the Bahraini Govt to fill their agenda... nothing more!! :down: :down:

PS- Why the rush to get Bahrain in 2011, instead of 2012! The pro-argument borders on ridiculous, coz there is no logical argument to be had.

Thousands of F1 employess as well as millions of fans are just supposed to re-schedule their plans so that this toad can earn some money & act as an F1 dictator.
FIA's fact finding mission included Jean Toad visiting the oppressive Govt, staying in utter luxury & dining with Royalty. What facts did they find regarding common man's perception on the street, they are yet to reveal??? Sad.

Edited by Nivra, 05 June 2011 - 11:41.


#118 finignig

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 12:02

I wonder if anyone truly understands what the hell is going on in Bahrain anyway? I'm honest enough to admit that I don't, so I'm not not going to form an opinion. You have to be consistent with these things..there are human rights violations all around the world. Australia- refuges, American - Guantanamo , China, India..list goes on. At what stage does F1 take a stance and say "No". As I said, I don't understand the situation in Bahrain, but it sounds like it would directly affect F1. Where is the moral ground?


Please read the beginning of the other thread on the topic, i wrote up quite a few posts that gives you a good idea of what is happening.


Have any groups from Bahrain said they want the GP banned?



Not officially, but protestors were showing annoyance at the government’s push for F1 to come back instead of fixing the dilemma the country is in, right now the mood is “lets make the best out of it” from everyone I speak to. i stress no violence will be on anyone’s agenda. the protest movement has been.. unlike the 90s.. very peaceful.

#119 finignig

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 12:05

Putting all the political drama aside.

Many here are worried over the BIC employees, the ones that actually work on putting the “show” in place alongside the paddock, who have been raided at their officies, humiliated, made to sing and dance, bark like dogs and then arrested.

All of whom are from the same religious sect, some have been released and others still not heard of.

I find that one incident enough to cause the F1 establishment to be upset as these are “motorsport” workers who have worked alongisde the circus for 7 years, let alone the bigger picture of whats happening here!

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#120 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 12:36

It was question of their safety. Now it is becoming also political in a sense that people start taking sides. If we apply some of those filtration criteria evenly, we should be boycotting almost all countries, including perhaps GB. This is a sport, and should remain so focused. More pressing issue is whether teams can manage that additional burden, and I find rather strange that very few are concerned about it.


So you are confused as to why people are more concerned about human rights abuses in Bahrain than if a F1 team can manage to fit a race into their schedule? I am confused by your confusion.

#121 Andrew Hope

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 12:42

I believe the point he's trying to make is that all countries have blood on their hands in some sense, every day, and it's a slippery slope if we start picking and choosing what kind of violence is acceptable and what kind of violence isn't, with a view to holding that country's GP hostage.

#122 Xpat

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 12:48

I believe the point he's trying to make is that all countries have blood on their hands in some sense, every day, and it's a slippery slope if we start picking and choosing what kind of violence is acceptable and what kind of violence isn't, with a view to holding that country's GP hostage.


You think drawing a line somewhere is too complicated so you don't think any line should be drawn anywhere.



#123 F1 Tor.

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 12:49

What Webber said. :wave:

#124 BullHead

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 13:01

Drawing a line somewhere is often hypocritical. Unless perhaps you stop following global sport, stop supporting multinational corporations, become an anarchist....

#125 Andy35

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 13:06

Who would have thought I would ever agree with Max Mosley ? :confused:

He's right of course. For once.

Andy

#126 goldenboy

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 13:07

You think drawing a line somewhere is too complicated so you don't think any line should be drawn anywhere.

:up:

#127 goat0063

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 20:33

http://www.telegraph...goes-ahead.html

According to this article, Ferrari are in favour of the race. Shame on them.

Joe Seward posted this too...

http://wp.me/ppB1o-1Kh

Edited by goat0063, 05 June 2011 - 20:39.


#128 Clatter

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 21:13

http://www.telegraph...goes-ahead.html

According to this article, Ferrari are in favour of the race. Shame on them.

Joe Seward posted this too...

http://wp.me/ppB1o-1Kh


Until I see a report that teams\drivers are refusing to go I will assume they are all in favour. Any comments they may make in the meantime will prove to be empty words if they attend.

#129 goat0063

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 21:20

Until I see a report that teams\drivers are refusing to go I will assume they are all in favour. Any comments they may make in the meantime will prove to be empty words if they attend.

:up:

#130 R2D2

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 21:49

http://www.telegraph...goes-ahead.html

According to this article, Ferrari are in favour of the race. Shame on them.

There they go again confirming that Ferrari's team principal is on the WMSC. Extraordinary. The FIA seem to be in denial about that.

#131 engel

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 22:14

There they go again confirming that Ferrari's team principal is on the WMSC. Extraordinary. The FIA seem to be in denial about that.


I m not sure Ferrari were present in Barcelona, I think Cornelis was there as per usual. AFAIK the only team member there was Vijay Mallya representing India (not Force India)

#132 CaptainJackSparrow

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 22:15

Race, for sure.

#133 R2D2

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 22:21

I m not sure Ferrari were present in Barcelona

How did they see Stefano put his hand up then? :)

#134 engel

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 22:49

How did they see Stefano put his hand up then? :)


Oh I m not questioning whether Ferrari support Bahrain, Domenicali made statements to that effect in Monaco, I m just not sure he was physically present in Barcelona. As to hands, I m sure you are referring to that article by the telegraph? No clue

#135 Meanbeakin

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 23:09

Surely the decision taken by the FIA won't be able to stand potentially 5 months of universal condemnation. Don't know why they're feeling the need to blatantly shaft India like this.

#136 engel

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 23:13

Surely the decision taken by the FIA won't be able to stand potentially 5 months of universal condemnation. Don't know why they're feeling the need to blatantly shaft India like this.



Again, Mallya was present at the WMSC, the vote wouldn't be "unanimous" if the representative for India had issues with the Indian GP getting moved. My guess, they probably welcome the move, gives them a bit of breathing space. Plus they get the season ender slot

Edited by engel, 05 June 2011 - 23:13.


#137 Yolandy

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 23:13

And he had no problem going to China while Tibetan monks were being murdered or to Brazil were dissidents were being excecuted while he was drinking champagne.

I find it funny when western people think Dalai Lama is a hero promoting peace or Tibetans suppressed by the authority. Originally from Asia, I think from my understanding, the Tibet issue started because Chinese authority gave old Tibetan slaves freedom, and many old aristocrats left several decades ago (including Dalai Lama), then they try to get back their slavery back. Dalai Lama is one of them. I believe those old Tibetan aristocrats (many of them have kids as the leader of monks in Temples) almost deserve what they get.

And yes, I might well be biased because I went to Tibet once and I can read and somewhat speak Chinese.

#138 Clatter

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 23:43

I find it funny when western people think Dalai Lama is a hero promoting peace or Tibetans suppressed by the authority. Originally from Asia, I think from my understanding, the Tibet issue started because Chinese authority gave old Tibetan slaves freedom, and many old aristocrats left several decades ago (including Dalai Lama), then they try to get back their slavery back. Dalai Lama is one of them. I believe those old Tibetan aristocrats (many of them have kids as the leader of monks in Temples) almost deserve what they get.

And yes, I might well be biased because I went to Tibet once and I can read and somewhat speak Chinese.



Maybe I'm mis-understanding this, but are you saying they want to be slaves?

#139 engel

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 23:50

Maybe I'm mis-understanding this, but are you saying they want to be slaves?

no, I think he's referring to this

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#140 Meanbeakin

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 01:21

Again, Mallya was present at the WMSC, the vote wouldn't be "unanimous" if the representative for India had issues with the Indian GP getting moved. My guess, they probably welcome the move, gives them a bit of breathing space. Plus they get the season ender slot


Does Mallya really speak for everyone organising the Indian GP plus anyone who's already made plans to attend? I mean surely Vijay Mallya doesn't speak for everyone.

#141 Tufty

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 01:30

Does Mallya really speak for everyone organising the Indian GP plus anyone who's already made plans to attend? I mean surely Vijay Mallya doesn't speak for everyone.

Speaking for everyone in India is kind of the point of being the Indian representative... since he is closely involved in the Indian GP it's hardly a big jump from there to saying that he has voted in the best interests of the Indian race.

#142 Alx09

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:56

Bahrain = Oil = Motor racing backers/sponsors = Teams are weak and don't dare to go against them

If the teams took a stand against racing there in the oil-rich country, that would be a stand for the people against the regime who has killed, tortured and mistreated thousands and also against the greedy corporations.

If the teams with no spine go there and race (seeing all these teams who are for racing there pisses me off), I hope protesters will breach the security some way. What will the guards do? Gun them down as usual infront of millions of TV viewers?

Greedy F1, sad to see it cares so little about the people.

Edited by Alx09, 06 June 2011 - 12:56.


#143 sosidge

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:02

I hope the teams are strong enough to make a stand over the Bahrain GP. There have been a lot of strong words but for them to have any credibility they need to be backed up with actions.

Unfortunately the financial implications and mutual back-scratching are likely get in the way of principled behaviour.

If FOTA do boycott the race, it will open the doors for HRT's maiden race victory!

#144 Rob

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:17

If FOTA do boycott the race, it will open the doors for HRT's maiden race victory!


I believe the rules state that a certain amount of cars are needed on the grid for a race to be started. Two doesn't qualify IIRC.

#145 MaxScelerate

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:22

I believe the point he's trying to make is that all countries have blood on their hands in some sense, every day, and it's a slippery slope if we start picking and choosing what kind of violence is acceptable and what kind of violence isn't, with a view to holding that country's GP hostage.

I understand that point.. However, the fact that there are many reports of the Circuit's employees being beaten and arrested means that the GP becomes not just a political tool for the monarchy but an actual 'motor' of injustice.

#146 Clatter

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:31

I believe the rules state that a certain amount of cars are needed on the grid for a race to be started. Two doesn't qualify IIRC.


I stand to be corrected, but i don't think the rules say anything about the minimum number of cars. The Concorde agreement however does have a minimum number, but thats for contractual reasons as to how many Bernie has to ensure so that he gets paid. Hence the farce at Indy when all the cars took the parade lap.

#147 jonpollak

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:48

No.
The opportunity for the world's broadcasters to have the Day of Rage II splashed all over global screens with 750 million (sic) people watching will provide the evidence of how insular, compassionless and myopic our governance is.

Perfect vehicle for an appropriate insurrection.



#148 Xpat

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:44

Interesting piece from CNN.com

http://us.cnn.com/20....html?hpt=hp_c1



#149 rr0cket

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 15:00

Racing here is a great idea, the report is from today. http://english.aljaz...4812696776.html

A, F1 should stay away from places like this. I'ts all a huge masquerade for the public, and F1 wants to be part of it, how "rich" of them.... B, should they continue to go ahead with the plan. Teams should be obligated to go, but they should consider their moral obligation to protest as well.




#150 jerriy

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 15:02

Boycot bloody Bahrain!

The murder, terror and plunder of the people of Bahrain was perpetrated in the name of Formula 1. So it would be an outrage for the GP to be held in a place where the organizers were probably either the perpetrators or the victims themselves (Bahrain is a tiny microstate where the anti democratic crackdown was timed precisely in order to accommodate the grand prix event. Therefore Toad & co should not disgrace themselves and put the formula one into disrepute (just like they are so eager to rebuke drivers who might have done something that allegedly put the sport in disrepute ;)