Jump to content


Photo

AUTOSPORT Weekly Poll 6/7 June: Should F1 go to Bahrain this year?


  • Please log in to reply
105 replies to this topic

Poll: Should F1 go to Bahrain this year? (331 member(s) have cast votes)

Should F1 go to Bahrain this year?

  1. Yes (45 votes [13.64%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.64%

  2. No (285 votes [86.36%])

    Percentage of vote: 86.36%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#1 AUTOSPORT-Polls

AUTOSPORT-Polls
  • AUTOSPORT Magazine

  • 86 posts
  • Joined: February 11

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:35

Hi everyone

The forum glitch appears to be fixed, so we can finally bring you this week's AUTOSPORT Weekly Poll. This time around, we'd like to find out what you think about the FIA giving the green light for a Bahrain Grand Prix this year. I'm aware that there is an existing poll related to this topic, and have no desire to interfere with the discussion taking place on that thread. But while that one is trying to tackle the subject from a few different angles, we're going to play it with a straight bat and boil it down to one question - do you think a Bahrain GP this year is a good idea?

We'll be taking the results of the poll tomorrow morning to run in the news section of this week's AUTOSPORT magazine.

Look forward to seeing what you all think!

Regards

Mark Glendenning
AUTOSPORT

Advertisement

#2 SimMaker

SimMaker
  • Member

  • 771 posts
  • Joined: June 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:39

I dont want to see F1 get cought up in something where it will be used as a poltiical tool in a potentially violent situation.

#3 Ise

Ise
  • Member

  • 217 posts
  • Joined: February 11

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:40

No, no and no again. My views are pretty much the same as Ross Brawn's.

#4 Collective

Collective
  • Member

  • 1,123 posts
  • Joined: June 05

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:45

I dont want to see F1 get cought up in something where it will be used as a poltiical tool in a potentially violent situation.

This.

And a few other things:

- It's also potentially dangerous for teams, media, drivers and fans.
- Indian and other folks that had plane tickets and reservations for an October 30 Indian GP. Unless Bernie plans to reimburse them.
- Team members will barely rest before having to get ready for preseason testing.

Commercial interests aside, I see little to no reasons to hold this GP in 2011.


#5 cutting42

cutting42
  • New Member

  • 28 posts
  • Joined: March 05

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:47

F1 decided not to attend based upon the "Day of Rage" and political unrest in Bahrain. These have not changed so F1 should still not attend. Sport must not become a tool of politics no matter how much money is being offered.

#6 Watkins74

Watkins74
  • Member

  • 5,799 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:47

I voted No. I am not going to pretend I am an expert on everything that is going on in Bahrain. I just don't want to see a driver come out of a turn and find 10 protesters lying across the track. If they do go, I admit that I will watch.



#7 biercemountain

biercemountain
  • Member

  • 967 posts
  • Joined: June 01

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:49

I voted No. As Han Solo often said, "I've got a bad feeling about this".


#8 OSX

OSX
  • Member

  • 4,260 posts
  • Joined: April 06

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:49

No.


#9 Stormsky68

Stormsky68
  • Member

  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: March 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:50

I see no difference between the behaviour of Bahrain, China, Malaysia, Brazil, Turkey or the UAE

sorry..I say yes

#10 saskia

saskia
  • New Member

  • 19 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:51

- It's also potentially dangerous for teams, media, drivers and fans.
- Indian and other folks that had plane tickets and reservations for an October 30 Indian GP. Unless Bernie plans to reimburse them.
- Team members will barely rest before having to get ready for preseason testing.
Commercial interests aside, I see little to no reasons to hold this GP in 2011.


This. I see no reason why this GP has to be held this year.

#11 senamic

senamic
  • Member

  • 90 posts
  • Joined: March 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:57

I'm afraid I have to agree with Maxmillion Mosley on this one... Politics and sport should be mutually exclusive, but in this case the only point of the sport being in Bahrain this year would be as a political tool... Add safety concerns and the humanitarian argument to that and I have to give a no, certainly no.

#12 Alx09

Alx09
  • Member

  • 1,278 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:57

Absolutely not. It's negative for the teams (no break), it's bad for Formula 1s image. It's dangerous for the people of the country, for the drivers, for the teams.

The only thing that could be the reason that they go there is big money. So, let's see how far greed can reach.

Edited by Alx09, 06 June 2011 - 12:59.


#13 Greem

Greem
  • Member

  • 324 posts
  • Joined: October 06

Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:58

"See, the Kingdom of Bahrain is beautiful and safe, it must be so because the F1 circus is coming to town".

No, they shouldn't race in Bahrain.

#14 smitten

smitten
  • Member

  • 1,451 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:00

You ask two different questions.

Should F1 go to Bahrain - Yes
Is it a good idea - No

It is always very difficult when you mix politics and sport. There are a number of GPs held in countries with dubious human rights records - and we are debatably getting another one next year with the US GP. Did Britain engage in an illegal war? There is some pretty ropey stuff going on in Turkey, but it isn't reported quite as widely as the Bahrain situation. Pick any country where a GP is held and you can find problems with it. A driver was involved in an armed attack in Brazil last year, but not many people are calling for that GP to be dropped.

If you want F1 to take a stand on political issues then it must be consistent, but the political mores of the the west are very different to those in other parts of the world. Who decides who is right?

#15 krapmeister

krapmeister
  • Member

  • 5,602 posts
  • Joined: August 08

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:12

I'm afraid I have to agree with Maxmillion Mosley on this one... Politics and sport should be mutually exclusive, but in this case the only point of the sport being in Bahrain this year would be as a political tool... Add safety concerns and the humanitarian argument to that and I have to give a no, certainly no.


This.

The FIA threatened to pull the Turkish GP from the calender 5 years ago because the Turkish organisers took the opportunity to use the trophy presentation for political propoganda, an act the FIA claimed threatened to compromise it's political neutrality. This will IMO be of a magnitude many times worse than what the turkish organisers did, yet the FIA apparently sees no problem with it... :down:

Edited by krapmeister, 06 June 2011 - 13:17.


#16 SimMaker

SimMaker
  • Member

  • 771 posts
  • Joined: June 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:13

I see no difference between the behaviour of Bahrain, China, Malaysia, Brazil, Turkey or the UAE

sorry..I say yes


Just two to add to your list, in some peoples eyes no doubt.

USA and UK.

USA stands accused of torturing British Citizens at Guantanamo....and the UK stands accused of knowing this, yet still using the data obtained from "Torture".

#17 Matt Somers

Matt Somers
  • Member

  • 555 posts
  • Joined: March 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:13

No and it will be the 1st race I haven't watched in years if it does go ahead. We should vote with our feet and anyone that thinks F1 shouldn't be going to Bahrain should not watch the race either.

#18 Afterburner

Afterburner
  • In the running for best OP of 2014

  • 3,519 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:14

F1 should do everything that it can to secure the race at Bahrain--but if it comes at the cost of the teams' safety, then it's probably a bad idea. I was thrilled to see that Bahrain was back on the calendar a few days ago, but it seems we're going down the same road with a "day of rage" planned for the race date again. If there's a possibility of violence occurring at the race, then it shouldn't be held, in my opinion.

#19 Rob

Rob
  • Member

  • 8,254 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:15

The regime clearly intend to use the Grand Prix for political propaganda purposes.

The authorities have killed innocent protestors, some in very violent ways, and have imprisoned medical staff who treated injured protestors. I don't want the sport to be used as a political tool to add a legitimacy to this regime.

Advertisement

#20 Pizdek

Pizdek
  • Member

  • 291 posts
  • Joined: December 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:17

yes. i dont give a **ck for anything except racing. btw they all have big salarys, earn it!

#21 Altitude

Altitude
  • Member

  • 184 posts
  • Joined: February 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:19

I voted no, but that is because personally I dont particularly like the place (circuit) anyway. I wont miss it if it never reappears on a F1 calendar, regardless of the political situation.

#22 Dunder

Dunder
  • Member

  • 6,784 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:22

Voted no.

My primary objection is not really the morals (which are a whole lot more complex and balanced than "authoritarian government shoots peaceful protesters").
Nonetheless, F1 as a sport would be seen as taking the government's side which I don't think is wise and I am sure a number of sponsors will make this clear.

#23 PayasYouRace

PayasYouRace
  • Member

  • 7,468 posts
  • Joined: January 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:26

No.

I say that because of the danger to the participants and spectators, the damage F1's image and simply because they missed their slot this year.

If they get things sorted out I have less objection to next year's race, but it would be best for everyone involved to not go this year.

#24 jonnoj

jonnoj
  • Member

  • 1,114 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:26

I can see the race turned into one of those 'behind closed doors' events. like they've had with the football. Will the *stockholders* have to endure a weekend of being surrounded by thousands of heavy-handed security staff? That'll make great publicity for Bahrain when it's transmitted across the world.

No one has mentioned the marshalls and other people who are needed to run the event. If the weekend relies upon local marshalls, I wonder how many will turn up or who will decide not to turn up on race day? Does the FIA have a team of mercenary marshalls available for the event?



#25 engel

engel
  • Member

  • 5,037 posts
  • Joined: November 08

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:26

The only way F1 can avoid making a political statement would be not to even discuss reinstating the Bahrain GP. Sorry chaps, see you next year, that sort of thing. The way they played it anything they do is a political statement, they go they allow F1 to become a PR tool in the hands of the Bahrain government. They don't go they take a stance against the very people that have sunk a few hundred million dollars into the sport. Loose - Loose.

I voted No, they shouldn't go, but IMO a better option would be they should even have discussed reinstating the race

#26 Ampersand

Ampersand
  • Member

  • 40 posts
  • Joined: May 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:29

yes. i dont give a **ck for anything except racing. btw they all have big salarys, earn it!


"They" don't all have big salaries. The drivers can't race without all the personnel behind the scenes and most of them aren't earning millions. And even so, drivers are paid their big salaries to race - that doesn't mean anyone can expect them to put themselves in unnecessary danger or to abandon all their ethics in a situation which is NOT what they signed up for.

I voted no. It's bad for Formula One's image, it's dangerous for all involved and it has already caused further unrest.

Edited by Ampersand, 06 June 2011 - 13:32.


#27 Hairpin

Hairpin
  • Member

  • 4,468 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:35

Rubens are doing it all wrong: "But for us, the drivers, what really matters is safety. The rest is not important."
It is not, Rubens, the safety of a few F1 drivers are far less important than the future and safety of the entire population of a country.

Then Boullier:

"I have already spoken at length about our team's position recently: we are happy to go to Bahrain as long as our safety and the security of the people living there is guaranteed."


I can not believe how stupid they are. Even if they are just scared little money hungry poor excuses for human beings they can not officially say that they are just that! They need to say something about not wanting to be cards in the political play or something, not saying that they actually are just that, that they are happy to be part of the political play as long as they have protection against the rage of the people. Now we will have the entire army surrounding the track and people only in the VIP area.

What idiots.

#28 Pizdek

Pizdek
  • Member

  • 291 posts
  • Joined: December 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:36

"They" don't all have big salaries. The drivers can't race without all the personnel behind the scenes and most of them aren't earning millions. And even so, drivers are paid their big salaries to race - that doesn't mean anyone can expect them to put themselves in unnecessary danger or to abandon all their ethics in a situation which is NOT what they signed up for.

I voted no. It's bad for Formula One's image, it's dangerous for all involved and it has already caused further unrest.


I really dont see any danger for drivers and teams if security would be proper.

#29 jonpollak

jonpollak
  • Member

  • 13,593 posts
  • Joined: March 00

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:37

Yes
The opportunity for the world's broadcasters to have the Day of Rage II splashed all over global screens with 750 million (sic) people watching will provide the evidence of how insular, compassionless and myopic our governance is.

Perfect vehicle for an appropriate insurrection.
Jp

Edited by jonpollak, 06 June 2011 - 13:43.


#30 Unbiased

Unbiased
  • Member

  • 414 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 06 June 2011 - 13:39

It seems hip for many these days to jump on the "We should not race in Bahrein because of human rights, safety, blahblah" bandwagon.

Yet they ignore the facts about places like China, Abu Dhabi, Brazil to name a few. In those countries every day the government is hunting down, arresting, imprisoning and executing people who are against the government. They have killed more of their own citizens for the same reasons as Bahrein has.

Just ask the peaceful Tibetan monks in China, unlike the "peaceful protestors" in Bahrein armed to the teeth shooting anyone who resembled the authorities.

So a lot of hypocrisy and ignorance is involved in this. If you are against this GP, you should also be against the others, if you want to be consistent and come across believable. If you are not against the others and make up excuses why it is OK for those governemnets to arrest/execute their citizens, you fall in the hypocritical and ignorant, jumping on the bandwagon crowd.

Buemi said he has family living there and they say it is OK to race there because it is safe and stable. And he said he is a racer, not a politician so he wants to go. And that is the way it should be.

Other drivers will use this for a PR thing, like Webber, yet next time a reporter will ask him about China, he will look like a fool.

Let's go racing, F1 has no authority to stamp a political statement onto anyone or anything, especially not if it uses double standards towards other countries who do similar things.

#31 Bloggsworth

Bloggsworth
  • Member

  • 7,499 posts
  • Joined: April 07

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:08

Well - Another popular vote for the FIA and Bernie to ignore.

#32 Bloggsworth

Bloggsworth
  • Member

  • 7,499 posts
  • Joined: April 07

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:11

If no motor racing fan in the world tuned into the Bahrain GP the FIA and Bernie might take notice, but only in so far is it would make them rush to check the contracts to see if they have to refund the advertisers and sponsors any money....

#33 Alx09

Alx09
  • Member

  • 1,278 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:12

Rubens are doing it all wrong: "But for us, the drivers, what really matters is safety. The rest is not important."
It is not, Rubens, the safety of a few F1 drivers are far less important than the future and safety of the entire population of a country.

What idiots.

+1

Edited by Alx09, 06 June 2011 - 14:12.


#34 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 57,687 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:14

Yes
The opportunity for the world's broadcasters to have the Day of Rage II splashed all over global screens with 750 million (sic) people watching will provide the evidence of how insular, compassionless and myopic our governance is.

Perfect vehicle for an appropriate insurrection.
Jp


When was the last time we saw something from outside the paddock/track filmed?

#35 jerriy

jerriy
  • Member

  • 282 posts
  • Joined: April 11

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:15

Absolutely NO

The Baharin GP should NOT be held at all! SCRAP that GP from the calendar, Bernie/Toad!

And that doesn't mean the F1 community should start acting holier than thou promoters of democracy or involve themselves in politics. However the barbaric Bahraini repression is something that's DIRECTLY related to the F1 since the crackdown was timed and hastened in order to accommodate the grand prix event. In other words the Bahrain GP besmirches the F1 world in a direct way just as it did in South Africa where only white people had the permission to participate and attend motorsport events. So scrap the damn thing and use this opportunity to give the slot to those other new places that are clamoring to organize a race.

Edited by jerriy, 06 June 2011 - 14:36.


#36 MaxScelerate

MaxScelerate
  • Member

  • 4,316 posts
  • Joined: January 02

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:17

It seems hip for many these days to jump on the "We should not race in Bahrein because of human rights, safety, blahblah" bandwagon.

Yet they ignore the facts about places like China, Abu Dhabi, Brazil to name a few. In those countries every day the government is hunting down, arresting, imprisoning and executing people who are against the government. They have killed more of their own citizens for the same reasons as Bahrein has.

...

Right, it's the third or fourth time you've pasted it now? Of course, it's not like you're going to read answers (and they've been many), would you?

Show me one, ONE instance of China, or USA or whomever, having either arrested, beaten or otherwise constrained Formula One Grand Prix employees by the truckload, and I'll ask for a similar boycott.

Uigurs or Tibetan Monks beaten up at Shangaï track? No check.
Iraqi killed by evil American Security Corp so that the race in Austin could go on? No check.

THE FACT IS THE RACE IS PRETTY MUCH *ONE OF THE REASONS* FOR THE VIOLENCES. And that, makes it a good reason for opposition (to the race) or boycott.

#37 ViMaMo

ViMaMo
  • Member

  • 5,061 posts
  • Joined: September 03

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:25

Who in Bahrain gives a shite about F1? How many? Lets not go there because the Sheik wanted it to happen. Absolutely moronic.
F1 is a premier motorsport first, so why would they give any bother about F1?

#38 Watkins74

Watkins74
  • Member

  • 5,799 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:27

Well - Another popular vote for the FIA and Bernie to ignore.


Your opinion is shared by many and I respect it. I however think while it is popular to always blame Bernie, I am not so sure he is not willing to do the dirty work for the teams. The teams could all band together and say "no", but funny how they never do. Bernie gets blamed for going to new markets and leaving traditional circuits. The teams could say no but they don't. I think Bernie has no problem accepting the role as villian because then we can all feel good about our teams and forget that they are getting a piece of Bernies pie.

JMHO :smoking:

Edited by Watkins74, 06 June 2011 - 14:39.


#39 Callisto

Callisto
  • Member

  • 2,698 posts
  • Joined: October 08

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:41

no

Advertisement

#40 Fastcake

Fastcake
  • Member

  • 6,394 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:44

Your opinion is shared by many and I respect it. I however think while it is popular to always blame Bernie, I am not so sure he not willing to do the dirty work for the teams. The teams could all band together and say "no", but funny how they never do. Bernie gets blamed for going to new markets and leaving traditional circuits. The teams could say no but they don't. I think Bernie has no problem accepting the role as villian because then we can all feel good about our teams and forget that they are getting a piece of Bernies pie.

JMHO :smoking:

I agree with you actually. Bernie in this case in particular is getting a ton of hate poured upon him, when last I checked there were 25 other members of the WMSC all voting upon the Bahrani race to go ahead. From what I've seen of the man, Bernie never really cares what people think about him, so he's probably perfectly happy to accept all the criticism, often undeserved, thrown at him.

As for the race, I did vote no. Purely because I don't believe it to be a good idea to go to a country where that level of civil unrest has occurred recently, still too much of a risk.

#41 BlackCat

BlackCat
  • Member

  • 807 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:45

with so many races on calendar teams should have the right to miss at least 5-6 of them.

#42 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 57,687 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:46

It's not that many actually, certainly not enough to make 1/4 of them dropped scores.

#43 jerriy

jerriy
  • Member

  • 282 posts
  • Joined: April 11

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:47

It seems hip for many these days to jump on the "We should not race in Bahrein because of human rights, safety, blahblah" bandwagon.

The murder, terror and plunder of the people of Bahrain was perpetrated (among other reasons) in the name of Formula 1. It was timed precisely in order to accommodate the grand prix event. That makes it a whole different issue than any other human rights issue. The Bahraini goons want the F1 to be back as means to show that things are "back to normal". Toad should not disgrace himself and become a collaborator of this blood soaked resumption of "normalcy".

Edited by jerriy, 06 June 2011 - 14:52.


#44 hunnylander

hunnylander
  • Member

  • 4,448 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 06 June 2011 - 14:55

Anti-anarchism yes!

#45 Disgrace

Disgrace
  • RC Forum Host

  • 10,329 posts
  • Joined: January 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 15:08

I'm a bit surprised there has been no collective FOTA reaction yet.

We have the sole voices of Webber, Barrichello and Boullier to go on. They're only referring to the safety of themselves as well, rather than to the bigger picture. It's almost as if they're as short-sighted as the FIA, spouting "la-la-la can't hear you!"

I assume they'll come out with a collective stance soon or they're missing their big moment. Unfortunately, I feel this will come during a Grand Prix meeting for maximum publicity and it will overshadow the event.

#46 Dunder

Dunder
  • Member

  • 6,784 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 06 June 2011 - 15:17

I'm a bit surprised there has been no collective FOTA reaction yet.

We have the sole voices of Webber, Barrichello and Boullier to go on. They're only referring to the safety of themselves as well, rather than to the bigger picture. It's almost as if they're as short-sighted as the FIA, spouting "la-la-la can't hear you!"

I assume they'll come out with a collective stance soon or they're missing their big moment. Unfortunately, I feel this will come during a Grand Prix meeting for maximum publicity and it will overshadow the event.


I would expect them to discuss it in Canada.
From what has been said by individual representatives, it looks like there isn't a collective position. Renault and Mercedes have been critical but for different reasons. Webber has made a principled statement, Barrichello is worried about the drivers' safety whereas Buemi said he would want to race.


#47 pdac

pdac
  • Member

  • 1,150 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 15:43

F1 is a professional sport and a very big business. Like all businesses, it needs to do what's best for business. So I voted "Yes".

Do I like the idea of F1 going there - hell no. I dislike the way morals are cast aside for money - but that's the way of the world and all of the parties with a vested interest have elected to partake in the grand prix (wholely reprehesible in my opinion).

The race was not cancelled at the start of the season - merely put on hold. Those that thought it should be should have been shouting so from the highest point - they have all chosen to bury their heads and cave in to the desires of Bernie et al. So, it's their decision.

#48 Atreiu

Atreiu
  • Member

  • 10,023 posts
  • Joined: May 07

Posted 06 June 2011 - 15:48

Absolutely not.

#49 Sakae

Sakae
  • Member

  • 19,256 posts
  • Joined: December 03

Posted 06 June 2011 - 16:01

I did not vote, because of fear that my vote shall be ambiguous and can be misinterpreted by those with vested interest to explore the ambiguity to cover political agenda.

Vote is YES, if FOTA decides it is acceptable to them in terms of personnel safety, and resources strain.
Vote is NO, if FOTA decides it is not acceptable.

#50 Jamiednm

Jamiednm
  • Member

  • 1,718 posts
  • Joined: March 10

Posted 06 June 2011 - 16:24

From a selfish point of view, I want it to go ahead because it is an extra race and means that this season will run to Christmas. I like the thought of sitting in my house on a cold dark December Sunday with the Christmas tree up, watching a GP.

But on the important side, it's not a good idea to stage the race on moral grounds. I don't even consider safety because the event will be very secure, no doubt about it. Also, violent protests towards foreigners is not inkeeping with how the protests in Bahrain have been conducted.