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Motocross nostalgia?


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#1 chrisj

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 16:48

Any interest here in Motocross nostalgia? Does it fit within the scope of this forum? It's motorized ... it's racing ... on tracks, even though they were sand, mud and dirt ... it had heroes and share of tragedies and even a golden age (which in my opinion was 70's and early '80s).

One of my big dreams as a kid was to go to the exotic sounding "Citadel of Namur" in Belgium, to see the best riders race on the best track. Never happened. One thing I always liked was that motocross (motorcycle racing in general) always seemed less uptight than car racing, less formal.

For me Bob Hannah was "it", but of course Roger De Coster was "the man" to everyone.

It was a sport where you could compete for not a lot of money, bravery counted and there were different ways to race -- not everyone was the same. I remember thinking I had a little talent, until Broc Glover came to a local race (with a factory Yamaha) and was so much better than everyone it was scary.

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#2 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 17:26

Chris

During my teens scrambling, as it was then called, was often on the Beeb (Grandstand) most Saturday afternoons during the winter months. With Murray commentating as only he knows how, riders such as Jeff Smith, Dave Bickers, Vic Eastwood, Badger Goss, Chris Horsfield, the Rickman Brothers, Arthur Lampkin and so on, then the bikes, Husqvarna, CZ, BSA, Matchless Metisse and so on. It was a wonderful era and each Saturday I prayed for ice and snow so the damned horse racing would be cancelled and the scrambling took their place. Quite why interest in scrambling faded, but it was about the time when they began to call it 'Motocross'. Rallycross also had it's heyday shortly afterwards but that's gone from our screens. Very sad.

#3 fil2.8

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 18:55

Chris

During my teens scrambling, as it was then called, was often on the Beeb (Grandstand) most Saturday afternoons during the winter months. With Murray commentating as only he knows how, riders such as Jeff Smith, Dave Bickers, Vic Eastwood, Badger Goss, Chris Horsfield, the Rickman Brothers, Arthur Lampkin and so on, then the bikes, Husqvarna, CZ, BSA, Matchless Metisse and so on. It was a wonderful era and each Saturday I prayed for ice and snow so the damned horse racing would be cancelled and the scrambling took their place. Quite why interest in scrambling faded, but it was about the time when they began to call it 'Motocross'. Rallycross also had it's heyday shortly afterwards but that's gone from our screens. Very sad.



Very true , Paul , a golden time in our lives , not forgetting big Arthur Browning , who is now road racing a BSA Metisse 500 :up:


#4 Ray Oldam

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 11:19

Chris,

Hi. I have some old photos from schoolboy motocross days back in the early seventies - on BSA Bantams and a Dalesman Puch (anyone remember those?). Among others, we raced against Graham Noyce, Neil Hudson and Jacques Vimond, though we went the road racing route once we 'graduated' at 16. I shall have a dig around and scan a few!

All the best.

Ray :wave:

Edited by Ray Oldam, 12 June 2011 - 11:19.


#5 joeninety

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 12:49

Nice one Ray
This photo was used for the Wassell publicity brochure. I got to try all the stuff from Jim Lee's workshops. :rolleyes: I remember this kid coming to the YMSA he was pretty good only aged about 10 at a guess. It was Dave Thorpe no less ! The Wassell was built around the time of the Dalesman, the senior class allowed 200cc British four stroke bikes to compete with the 125cc strokers :)
Posted Image
By joeninety at 2011-06-12
Chris

"quote name='Ray Oldam' date='Jun 12 2011, 12:19' post='5095010']
Chris,

Hi. I have some old photos from schoolboy motocross days back in the early seventies - on BSA Bantams and a Dalesman Puch (anyone remember those?). Among others, we raced against Graham Noyce, Neil Hudson and Jacques Vimond, though we went the road racing route once we 'graduated' at 16. I shall have a dig around and scan a few!

All the best.

Ray :wave:
[/quote]


#6 Russell Burrows

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 21:07

Brit 'Scramblers' Randy Owen and I think Gordon Adsett did a tour down under in about 1969. They stashed their bikes and gear at my then employers, the Sydney Honda distributors, and didn't take much persuading to fire up the CZ and the Husqvana and perform some pretty impressive high speed antics in the car park. I think too that it was Randy, who from memory was no matinee idol in the looks department, told me that when socialising in Sydney it took him some time getting used to the local women declining his offer of a dance with '**** off'. But then perhaps he prefaced the offer with 'Im Randy'?

Edited by Russell Burrows, 12 June 2011 - 21:23.


#7 rotrax

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 08:15

Any interest here in Motocross nostalgia? Does it fit within the scope of this forum? It's motorized ... it's racing ... on tracks, even though they were sand, mud and dirt ... it had heroes and share of tragedies and even a golden age (which in my opinion was 70's and early '80s).

One of my big dreams as a kid was to go to the exotic sounding "Citadel of Namur" in Belgium, to see the best riders race on the best track. Never happened. One thing I always liked was that motocross (motorcycle racing in general) always seemed less uptight than car racing, less formal.

For me Bob Hannah was "it", but of course Roger De Coster was "the man" to everyone.

It was a sport where you could compete for not a lot of money, bravery counted and there were different ways to race -- not everyone was the same. I remember thinking I had a little talent, until Broc Glover came to a local race (with a factory Yamaha) and was so much better than everyone it was scary.

Hi, Went to watch the European sidecar cross at Newbury in the seventies.I saw a continental passenger lean over the rear of the outfit-it may well have been Roger Grogg's passenger-and pull a plug lead off of the outside cylinder of another continental team. I often wondered about the strength of his grip as I tried motocross passengering once and could hardly hang on with two hands!

#8 fil2.8

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 09:09

Hi, Went to watch the European sidecar cross at Newbury in the seventies.I saw a continental passenger lean over the rear of the outfit-it may well have been Roger Grogg's passenger-and pull a plug lead off of the outside cylinder of another continental team. I often wondered about the strength of his grip as I tried motocross passengering once and could hardly hang on with two hands!



Shocking :eek: :lol: ............................ :wave:


#9 Orson

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 10:05

Any interest here in Motocross nostalgia?

I was a huge fan as a 12 year old in the early 1970s.

I would like to enter Grand Prix season results into Wikipedia but, there's almost no data online other than the champions. If anyone can help with even just the yearly top ten in the standings, that would be a great help.

In case anyone missed the news, Adolf Weil passed away on May 12, 2011 at the age of 72.

#10 Geoff E

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 11:34

During my teens scrambling, as it was then called, was often on the Beeb (Grandstand) most Saturday afternoons during the winter months.


From what I remember, it was Scrambling when it was on ITV, then it swapped to BBC and became Motocross. I think ITV may have had it on Sundays, but I'm not too sure on that.

#11 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 08:06

Sorry but you're wrong. It definitely was SCRAMBLING on whatever channel. Murray commentated on scrambling in Grandstand on BBC1, whilst Denis Parkinson commentated on ITV. There, of course, was no comparison. I think Motocross was a European term which we slowly adopted.

It wasn't too long after that that we lost 50cc, 125cc, 250cc, 350cc and 500cc World Motorcycle Racing classes and gained Superstock, Supersport, Superbike and MotoGP, all of which look identical and all of which baffle me. :confused: :confused: :confused:

#12 fil2.8

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 10:05

It wasn't too long after that that we lost 50cc, 125cc, 250cc, 350cc and 500cc World Motorcycle Racing classes and gained Superstock, Supersport, Superbike and MotoGP, all of which look identical and all of which baffle me. :confused: :confused: :confused:



And me :cry: :cry: :down: :well:


#13 Geoff E

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 12:45

Murray commentated on scrambling in Grandstand on BBC1, whilst Denis Parkinson commentated on ITV.


Murray Walker was on ITV with Denis Parkinson. When he made the switch to BBC he left Denis behind.

Someone else remembers it like this-
"As a boy I remember scrambling on Sunday afternoons on the former ATV in the Midlands. Commentary was by Murray Walker and details of the course were provided by, I think, Denis Parkinson, whose catchphase was 'oop 'ill'. Among the names which I remember were Arthur Lampkin, John Rhodes, Vic Eastwood, Dave Bickers, 'Badger' Goss, Dave Nicholl and the champion of the time, Jeff Smith."

Taken from here - http://www.independe...ys-1502559.html

Edited by Geoff E, 15 June 2011 - 13:08.


#14 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:34

Sorry Geoff, and thanks for correcting me. I must have got into scrambling once Murray had joined Grandstand. I could never warm to Denis and his "slippin' and a slidin" commentaries.

I only ever actually saw top quality scrambling once, and that's when I saw Smith and Bickers at Lydden Hill. Those riders certainly went up in my estimation after watching them ride. Jeff Smith now lives in retirement in the US and Bickers made another career in converting cars for stunt movies. He used to install a sort of vertical cannon which at the right time, fired a charge downwards, flipping the car over in a series of spectacular barrel rolls for the cameras.

These days, motorcross seems to take place more in indoor arenas, with very high jumps so bikes spent a lot of time in the air. Riders also seem more inclined to 'show off' by turning their handlebars sideways when in the air. It seems to be about image now. Oh well.

#15 peterd

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 21:12

Life moves on in off-road. Here's what Associated Press is reporting today:

Supercross superstar Jeremy McGrath and motocross great Ricky Carmichael are collaborating to design a course that will give someone a chance to earn $1 million.

The Monster Energy Cup, Oct. 15 in Las Vegas, will feature elements of Supercross and motocross and one-class racing, combining 450cc and 250cc bikes. The purse will be $250,000, with $1 million going to anyone who can win all three motos.

Not a bad earner even by MotoGP standards.

#16 Ray Oldam

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 22:54

Chris,

Hi. After wrestling with setting up the scanner on wireless earlier today I finally got some photos scanned! Here's a couple of the Dalesman, way back in 1972. The race one was taken at Kirdford in Sussex - that's Chris Moxon behind me on a Rickman Zundapp I think, but hard to see him. I am in 'civvies' in the other one - I had my first job interview a couple of hours after it was taken! Classic seventies garb and barnet I am sporting there - hey - cool man!! :rotfl:

Posted Image


Posted Image

Ray :wave:

Edited by Ray Oldam, 17 June 2011 - 22:55.


#17 chrisj

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:42

Awesome Groovy 70's style there, Ray!!!

#18 peterd

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 07:05

Did you get the job, Ray?

#19 cheapracer

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 07:53

Yeah I'm right into it actually.

Raced as a teenager in the 70's and into my early 20's before family/business etc then I started Australia's biggest Vintage MX club in the early 90's and was Prez and racer for near 10 years then just a regular racer pre '75 class (CZ 250/400, CanAm TNT250, Elsinore 125) before moving over here.

I am gearing up these days (building the first one as we speak) to produce some Metisse frame kits to improve the level of participation in the pre '65 class in Oz as I will be competing on one myself when I move back permanently.

Pretty hard not to have 'The Man' as a hero but Johhny 'O' and Rick Johnson are also favorites. I had a Saturday evening with Jim Pomeroy around 2000 but didn't get to race against him as I had to go to a wedding on the Sunday darn it.



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#20 tonyed

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 10:28

In Cambridge we were deep in the heart of 'Scrambling' territory. Andy Lee ran our local motorcycle shop after splitting from his original business partner Ken Covill in Ely and I went to the CCAT to study engineering with Stuart Nunn from Sutton in Cambridgeshire who rode works CZs in the 70s with Dave Bickers.

I had a go on Stuarts' CZ250 and tried to take it off like a road racer, tons of revs and slip the clutch finished up with it on top of me. :rotfl:

The Cambridge Matchless club ran regular meetings attracting top fields, and are still an active club.

My 'own' club the Newmarket and District Motorcycle and Light Car Club ran regular Motocross meetings at Mildenhall.

Brian Stonebridge was also a Cantabridgian.

Couln't get into it or Grass Track as the thought of all that mud and cow sh*t, like falling off at Mmallory Park in the wet but in every race. :down:

#21 peterd

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 11:50

And both Andy and Stuart went on to set up two of the best motocross/training tracks in England. Andy's Elsworth Park, near Caxton Gibbet, was a British Championship venue and could have so easily hosted a world round. It was years ahead of its time. A testing but fun place to spend a Wednesday afternoon in summer, wobbling around trying to avoid being filled in by any number of the quality world class riders the UK produced in the 80s.
Stuart's Chippenham, near Cambridge, was a big sand pit, good for year round riding and much favoured as a test track for those going forth to take on the Dutch and Belgium sandflies. And it had a Happy Eater just down the road. Happy memories of both.

#22 cheapracer

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 16:17

I was pointed to this tonight ....

http://www.komonews....l?video=YHI&t=a

#23 Herr Wankel

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 18:32

Never 'scrambled' myself,but am sadly :blush: responsible for cannibalising two of the greatest off roaders we (the UK) have ever produced IMHO,to make speed hillclimbers.
# 1 Cheney BSA B50MX, # 2 CCM 580, 3 speed Bob Wright Rep.Sorry chaps,but needs must.Best trail and 'long distance trial' bike I ever had was a Can-Am Q4 175 Enduro.Impossible to kill the little bugger.Thank you Jeff Smith !!

HW

#24 Herr Wankel

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 20:52

What about the tianium works BSA, if you can get your hands on Motocross the big leap by Frank Melling it's a must.


My B50 motor was prepped by Fred Barlow (RIP) who worked in the BSA comp shop on the Titanium jobs.He also worked on the B50 based speedway motor. rotrax may know some more about that one. I never used to lay a spanner on mine save for checking valve clearances.Fred did a wonderful job,despite me thinking that £400 in 1983 was a small fortune.Money well spent.Didn't manage to beat LarryD though !!! I think that was down to the rider though !!! :p :rotfl:

HW

#25 joeninety

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 20:54

What about the titanium BSA, if you can get your hands on Motocross the big leap by Frank Melling it's a must read. Thanks Ray for the pic of a Dalesman and you in spoon collars ! Very David Essex.....

Edited by joeninety, 18 June 2011 - 21:01.


#26 Ray Oldam

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 16:53

Peter,

I did actually! Working at the old Kenwood food mixer factory in Havant - started on the grand sum of £9 a week in 1972 - but that would buy you quite a lot more in those days than it does now!!

ATB

Ray :wave:



Did you get the job, Ray?



#27 Ray Oldam

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 17:01

Err yes....Those collars could be quite dangerous in strong winds!! :rotfl:

The old Dalesman looked the part, but I don't think I was the only one to experience a frame break at the headstock - luckily we spotted it at the cracking stage before anything parted company in a big way - unlike one or two others!! We got it welded back up with some strengthening on there and it was fine after that.

Ray :wave:

What about the titanium BSA, if you can get your hands on Motocross the big leap by Frank Melling it's a must read. Thanks Ray for the pic of a Dalesman and you in spoon collars ! Very David Essex.....


Edited by Ray Oldam, 19 June 2011 - 17:01.


#28 Ray Oldam

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 17:11

Chris/Chaps,

Here's one for you all. Two lads at a Ringwood schoolboy meeting back in the early seventies. One went on to great things in adult MX, the other one became a speedway rider for Weymouth Wildcats. Anyone know who they are??

Posted Image

Ray



#29 Ray Oldam

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 17:40

Herr,

Cheney frames were the business as I remember. Someone had one made up for a BSA Bantam to use in schoolboy motocross, which they also fitted with a four speed gearbox (wow!!). There was also an Ariel Arrow based special - one of the lads' father was an engineer, and effectively cut a 250 arrow engine in half to produce a 125 single. At the time any 'non-British' bike was limited to 100cc, so this was within the rules. It went quite well actually!

ATB

Ray :wave:

Edited by Ray Oldam, 19 June 2011 - 17:41.


#30 peterd

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 21:51

I'm guessing one is Graham Noyce (#3?) and the other, no, I'll leave that for Rotrax

#31 Ray Oldam

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 22:15

Peter,

Well done. Yes, number 3 is Graham Noyce :clap: :clap: - he had moved on from his BSA Bantam to a Rickman machine by then. We'll leave the other one and see if anyone gets it.

Ray :wave:

#32 jonnoj

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 01:51

Vic Eastwood used to practice on some land close to my home. Over time it became quite popular with other riders, Vic Allan went there a lot. Eventually there were so many bikes practicing, the road leading to the land was cut and only us on trials bikes could get down there.

I think Vic Allan started a moto cross school and attracted a couple of personalities - Brian Jacks & Suzanne Dando were down there a couple of times. Jacks made use of his judo training quite a few times when I watched. He spent a lot of time on his arse.

Edited by jonnoj, 20 June 2011 - 01:55.


#33 cheapracer

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 04:46

How the hell did post #25 come after post #24???? :confused:

Spooky ......

#34 GD66

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 09:52

Joe90 edited his.

#35 joeninety

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 19:23

Joe90 edited his.

I always did things arse about face :rolleyes:

#36 joeninety

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 20:35

Err yes....Those collars could be quite dangerous in strong winds!! :rotfl:

The old Dalesman looked the part, but I don't think I was the only one to experience a frame break at the headstock - luckily we spotted it at the cracking stage before anything parted company in a big way - unlike one or two others!! We got it welded back up with some strengthening on there and it was fine after that.

Ray :wave:


The Dalesman was a relatively inexpensive motorcycle compared to the proper factory produced jobbies and a great affordable stop gap between the likes who rode home brewed specials and those whose parents who could afford a Husky or Maico. The best MX bike of that period considering price and user friendliness was the Bultaco Pursang range. With regard to the Dalesman frame breaking I can't recall it being a major problem on the whole but my Wassell, built and designed by the same frame engineer was a flop from start to finish. My problem was competing with the likes of Ray in the fashion stakes, flared trousers and platform shoes......COOL or WHAT

#37 small block

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 11:20

Chris

It was a wonderful era and each Saturday I prayed for ice and snow so the damned horse racing would be cancelled and the scrambling took their place. Quite why interest in scrambling faded, but it was about the time when they began to call it 'Motocross'. Rallycross also had it's heyday shortly afterwards but that's gone from our screens. Very sad.


Rallycross, (definitely), and scrambling/Motocross, (possibly), were started as something for the two and four wheel racing fraternities to do in the winter months. Mud, mud and more mud was an integral part of the action. What's really sad is that both Rallycross and (to some degree) Motocross have been turned into summer sports, dust, dust and more dust.



#38 jonnoj

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 15:25

Rallycross, (definitely), and scrambling/Motocross, (possibly), were started as something for the two and four wheel racing fraternities to do in the winter months. Mud, mud and more mud was an integral part of the action. What's really sad is that both Rallycross and (to some degree) Motocross have been turned into summer sports, dust, dust and more dust.


I've always thought of scrambling as the summer sport and trials for the winter. The tv coverage changed it to year round for a while. Bear in mind that scrambling is a spectator sport and the tracks had to be dry to get the cars in and out.



#39 cheapracer

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 17:25

Rallycross, (definitely), and scrambling/Motocross, (possibly), were started as something for the two and four wheel racing fraternities to do in the winter months. Mud, mud and more mud was an integral part of the action. What's really sad is that both Rallycross and (to some degree) Motocross have been turned into summer sports, dust, dust and more dust.


That's an amusing read when you're Orrstralian, we begged for a little rain to soften up our hard pack dusty tracks. You'll see a water truck at most Oz tracks.

Oh and don't miss Farleigh castle in September for you British based readers...

http://www.farleighc...php?page=events

Edited by cheapracer, 22 June 2011 - 17:30.


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#40 joepotts7

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 20:59

I am not really a Motocross man, but I really respect Brian Stonebridge:
Brian Stonebridge

Ben

#41 rotrax

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 21:39

My B50 motor was prepped by Fred Barlow (RIP) who worked in the BSA comp shop on the Titanium jobs.He also worked on the B50 based speedway motor. rotrax may know some more about that one. I never used to lay a spanner on mine save for checking valve clearances.Fred did a wonderful job,despite me thinking that £400 in 1983 was a small fortune.Money well spent.Didn't manage to beat LarryD though !!! I think that was down to the rider though !!! :p :rotfl:

HW

Hi, just picked up on this post-its a bit flattering to have a fellow enthusiast suggest you can add a little-so here goes. IIRC "Little Boy Blue"-Nigel Boocock-and another rider put in over a thousand laps of Coventry Speedway using the BSA B50 engined bikes. If my memory is as good as I hope, I am sure the frames were by Rob North. I believe the other rider may have been Les Owen. My mate Mike Lawrence the ex Birmingham Brummies rider and top Vintage Speedway and Grass Track rider of the 70's,80's and 90's who is now a major Speedway collector has one of the BSA bikes in his stable. There was no mechanical problems with the engines but the clutches could not be adjusted as normal and the oil bath primary case was outside Speedway practice. They are a conservative lot Speedway riders! I remember racing Frank Melling with his ex-works B50 Scrambler with my Speedway JAP. On flat smooth circuits I could often win while Frank would take the bumpy ones. The BSA was a superb all round package in Scrambles form and a good looker with it.

#42 rotrax

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 19:15

Hi, just picked up on this post-its a bit flattering to have a fellow enthusiast suggest you can add a little-so here goes. IIRC "Little Boy Blue"-Nigel Boocock-and another rider put in over a thousand laps of Coventry Speedway using the BSA B50 engined bikes. If my memory is as good as I hope, I am sure the frames were by Rob North. I believe the other rider may have been Les Owen. My mate Mike Lawrence the ex Birmingham Brummies rider and top Vintage Speedway and Grass Track rider of the 70's,80's and 90's who is now a major Speedway collector has one of the BSA bikes in his stable. There was no mechanical problems with the engines but the clutches could not be adjusted as normal and the oil bath primary case was outside Speedway practice. They are a conservative lot Speedway riders! I remember racing Frank Melling with his ex-works B50 Scrambler with my Speedway JAP. On flat smooth circuits I could often win while Frank would take the bumpy ones. The BSA was a superb all round package in Scrambles form and a good looker with it.

PS- On further reflection it is possible that Booey's co rider during the testing programe was Tony Lomas.

#43 larryd

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 19:47

My B50 motor was prepped by Fred Barlow (RIP) who worked in the BSA comp shop on the Titanium jobs.He also worked on the B50 based speedway motor. rotrax may know some more about that one. I never used to lay a spanner on mine save for checking valve clearances.Fred did a wonderful job,despite me thinking that £400 in 1983 was a small fortune.Money well spent.Didn't manage to beat LarryD though !!! I think that was down to the rider though !!! :p :rotfl:

HW

Bloody hell, Andy - I never thought my name would feature in a Motocross (sorry, Scramble) thread.

I'll never live that down . . . . . . . .

:p

Rotrax (Mike?) -- do I remember you at Tandragee in the 70s?


#44 Bernard

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 22:28

Hi folks have been away for a while but have been keeping tabs on the Nostalgia forum. I have memories of going to scrambles at Jewels Hill near Biggin Hill and Brands Hatch and have memories of Peter Holes Manx Metisse which made the most glorious noise and seemed uncontrollable in mud.

#45 rio

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 06:59

This seems to be a recurring interest among many people now. I know quite a few riders who, like myself, were initially taken to local cold and muddy scrambling events before eventually progressing onto road racing, but are now showing an interest in reliving their past

In some recent seaching for stuff about my childhood hero, Dave Bickers, I found the Pathe news website has LOADS of short video clips of old scrambling :
http://www.britishpa...ch=dave bickers

I also have a DVD [available from PLAY.COM and other sources] called 'Scarmbling in the 50's' and it has several of those Grandstand races [plus one or two older trials events] and there is a 'Scarmbling in the 60's' version too :
http://www.play.com/...urlrefer=search

Plus I'm lucky in that, although I only follow road racing now, I can indulge a bit of nostalgia as we have a well organised event locally called 'British Bike Bonanza', where several of the riders I remember from my school days, Andy Roberton and Vic Allan plus others, still compete [and win]. If you were similarly interested in doing the same I would suggest checking the AMCA website for clubman, national and international 'classic scramble' events


#46 TrevorHeath

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 02:51

I am not really a Motocross man, but I really respect Brian Stonebridge:
Brian Stonebridge

Ben


Does anyone have a photo of the BSA Speedway bike?

Great to read about Brian Stonebridge. My Father would talk about him and the two strokes beating the big four strokes "back in the day"

I remember him reminiscing about the 1960 memorial at Hawkstone Park and the "100,000 spectators"

Thanks

TH

#47 rotrax

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 11:41

Does anyone have a photo of the BSA Speedway bike?

Great to read about Brian Stonebridge. My Father would talk about him and the two strokes beating the big four strokes "back in the day"

I remember him reminiscing about the 1960 memorial at Hawkstone Park and the "100,000 spectators"

Thanks

TH

HI, Try visiting www.retro-speedway.com They are sure to be able to help from their extensive archive. Good luck, Rotrax.

#48 Macca

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 14:58

The Goodwood Revival had a scrambling retro special feature with a short course and a large number of the stars of the 'Grandstand' days and earlier -
http://www.goodwood....-champions.aspx

I'll put up a couple of pics later, and no doubt there'll be something about it in magazines next month.

Paul M

#49 Macca

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 15:07

See how many you can spot here:
http://jalbum.net/en.../album/1053170/

Paul M

#50 jonnoj

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 23:24

See how many you can spot here:
http://jalbum.net/en.../album/1053170/


Bought back a few memories. Some of the more famous riders get a mention on this programme for the event

Goodwood programme