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Jim Palmer


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#1 HistoryFan

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 14:54

He had good results in Tasman Serie in the 60s. Why doesn't he get the chance in F1 like other drivers from Australia and New Zealand in these days?

What happened with him?

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#2 Allen Brown

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 15:26

Eyesight problem wasn't it? Didn't he have trouble getting a licence at one point?

#3 David McKinney

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 15:52

That was the crux of the problem. He never had any trouble in NZ - or in Australia until, IIRC, around 1966. He continued to race saloons and sportscars in both countries after that, but single-seaters only in NZ

The refusal of the Australians to allow him to race single-seaters was in spite racing for more than a dozen years without an accident that I can recall, or causing one. I'm sure the fact that he'd just broken the Bathurst lap record had nothing to do with it

#4 Ray Bell

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 20:57

The CAMS had a rule that monocular vision excluded anyone from obtaining an Australian licence...

He had no problem until that time because he raced on his NZ licence. But when David McKay wanted him to contest the Gold Star for Scuderia Veloce, he had to obtain an Australian licence and this was denied him. There was no distinction between openwheelers or any other class, by the way.

I doubt that this had any impact on his chances to go F1, however. Does anyone know what rules applied there?

#5 David McKinney

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 21:45

Palmer apparently had (has) a "lazy" eye - not, as many believed, a glass eye

Don't know how that fits with a definition of "monocular vision"

As for your last sentence - the question has been discussed on TNF before

http://forums.autosp...showtopic=69620

#6 Catalina Park

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 01:14

Maybe if he had raced for a Victorian team instead of a Sydney team it would have been different? :drunk:

#7 wenoopy

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 04:10

Maybe if he had raced for a Victorian team instead of a Sydney team it would have been different? :drunk:


You are not suggesting, for one moment, that anyone might have been adjusting the "tilt" mechanism on the playing field, surely.

Is nothing sacred?

Stu


#8 HistoryFan

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:51

Thank you for the answers!

Same question I can ask for Leo Geoghegan

#9 seldo

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:18

Palmer apparently had (has) a "lazy" eye - not, as many believed, a glass eye

Don't know how that fits with a definition of "monocular vision"

As for your last sentence - the question has been discussed on TNF before

http://forums.autosp...showtopic=69620

I don't believe you are correct David. I had some dealings with him at the time including some assistance in the pits, and I am certain that he had definite monocular vision.

#10 ReWind

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:25

Here is what the man himself has to say about the subject.

(Something the thread starter could easily have found if he had cared to use Google to answer his own question. It took me less than a minute using "Jim Palmer" & "racing driver".)

Edited by ReWind, 15 October 2011 - 12:10.


#11 Michael Clark

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 04:21

From the time I attended my first NZGP as an 8.5 yr old, I heard 'Jimmy Palmer always wins because he has the best car'. The year was 1967 and by then he had already won three Gold Stars and had won the prestigious trophy for being first local driver home in the NZGP perhaps three times as well. I am sure the words I heard were being uttered all around Pukekohe, and indeed New Zealand - no doubt Jim heard them.

He pretty much retired from open-wheeler racing when he sold his McLaren M4A after his fourth Gold Star, and from motor racing generally, following his brief time in saloons. Being a naturally shy sort of chap, he was happy to fly under the radar - raise his family and run his business.

While researching something else about the so called 'golden age' of NZ motor racing, it dawned on me a decade or so ago that simply having the best car doesn't count for a lot if you can't drive - and all one need do is look at the relative performances of Jim and the Australians who came here with broadly similar machinery - they were really the better comparison than the locals. On that score Jim achieved fantastic results - not just in NZ but significantly also in Australia.

I've written a few articles about Jim now for NZ Classic Car and he has become a friend - that aside I have aimed to put his performances in perspective, afterall - it wasn't his fault no one in NZ could ever get anywhere near him. Sure it would have been interesting if Roly Levis or Graham McRae had been armed with decent 2.5-litre Climax powered cars during the 60s, or if Graeme Lawrence and Roly had run their FVA powered cars, and Laurence Brownlie for that matter, against the Palmer F2 McLaren - so that we could have had a measure of they performed against him - but it never happened.

The season spent with the ex-Jim Clark Lotus 32B highlights just how good Jim Palmer was. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that he would not have disgraced an F1 grid but he turned down the chance for the Driver to Europe scheme and I doubt he spends time wondering 'what if?' - unlike some others.

Best of all he is a top bloke and if there is a 'straighter' used car dealer around then I'd be amazed.

#12 Lola5000

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:27

As a side note Jims ex Foley Porsche 911 is very much alive in Victoria being restored,this car had a long history.
Foley,Palmer,Hamilton and Reg Mort.

#13 layabout

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 04:44

He had good results in Tasman Serie in the 60s. Why doesn't he get the chance in F1 like other drivers from Australia and New Zealand in these days?

What happened with him?


L-R: Jim & Judy Palmer, Michael Clark & friend at Pukekohe, July 2012....

Posted Image

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#14 layabout

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:52

Here's Jim Palmer in 2011 at the (NZFMR) Amon Festival at Hampton Downs in the same Brabham BT22 he raced @45 years ago:

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#15 wsp77

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 14:56

L-R: Jim & Judy Palmer, Michael Clark & friend at Pukekohe, July 2012....

jimjudypalmermchg.jpg

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I also see Howden Ganley in the photo   ;)