Jump to content


Photo

The most significant person from each F1 decade?


  • Please log in to reply
63 replies to this topic

#51 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,022 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 01 December 2011 - 15:39

Let's start with the fifties
Significant driver - Fangio. Five championships. "The man to beat". Set the standard for how a champion driver should behave both on and off track.
Significant non-driver _ Adolf Hitler. The over-riding influence in the fifties was postwar austerity coupled with postwar optimism. And, in the case of the UK, the availability of numerous airfields to provide venues for a club racing infrastructure to develop.

The sixties:
Significant driver - Graham Hill for typifying a racing driver together with Jackie Stewart for his safety campaigning
Non-driver - Jointly John Cooper and Colin Chapman for revolutionising the way that people went Grand Prix racing, ie the transition from 'Grandes marques' to 'Garagistes'.

Edited by D-Type, 02 December 2011 - 17:33.


Advertisement

#52 Bauble

Bauble
  • Member

  • 1,040 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 01 December 2011 - 15:41

I am too young, and I am not saying that personality does not matter. I am saying that how I read the OP, personality does not matter. I would prefer that the drivers showed more of them selves, and that both teams and fans would not class that as 'throwing toys out of the pram'.

:cool:


K etc.
You do seem to be at odds with many of the contributors, because of the interpretation of 'personality, which I think you and I agree refers to a particular person rather than someone's "personality, for instance several people have commented on Graham Hill's personality, and one to Nigel Mansell's lack of it, however, either could be named as fitting my second category quite reasonably.

Stick to your guns.

Yes! and who did change the name of my thread? Bloomin' cheek.

Edited by Bauble, 01 December 2011 - 15:41.


#53 Bauble

Bauble
  • Member

  • 1,040 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 01 December 2011 - 15:43

Your rules do not allow me to argue for or against any of them.

;-)

:cool:



Be like me, ignore the rules, I'm all for free speech, but to be honest I am not sure why you think that :|

#54 jj2728

jj2728
  • Member

  • 2,774 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 01 December 2011 - 16:19

Ahhh driver of the decade...that makes it soooo much easier :drunk: :rotfl:
But I'll give it a lash....

50s - Peter Collins
60s - Jim Clark
70s - Niki Lauda
Post 70s......don't really care

#55 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
  • Member

  • 2,140 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 01 December 2011 - 18:07

"The most significant person from each F1 decade?"

I fear, for the 2011-2020 period that may turn out to be Mr. Bauble...

#56 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,022 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 01 December 2011 - 22:49

The seventies

Driver - Mario Andretti for introducing a new level of professionalism to a driver’s approach to Grand Prix racing
Non-driver - A joint nomination: Bernie Ecclestone and Jean Marie Balestre whose FOCA/FISA power struggle or “war” led to Grand Prix racing becoming what it is today

The eighties

Driver - Ayrton Senna who raised commitment to win to new heights at the cost of on-track ethics
Non-driver - André de Cortanze for introducing the turbocharger to Grand Prix racing and creating a technical revolution


#57 Sebastian Tombs

Sebastian Tombs
  • Member

  • 1,332 posts
  • Joined: October 08

Posted 01 December 2011 - 23:29

What a waste of bandwidth :rolleyes: I'm going to learn Antipodese :cat: (sic...very)

#58 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,022 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 02 December 2011 - 08:42

What a waste of bandwidth :rolleyes: I'm going to learn Antipodese :cat: (sic...very)

Why?

This is not a "Question of fact" - we have a separate subforum for those now. It is a "Question of opinion" - a valid topic for A forum dedicated to the research, study, discussion, and just plain ol' talking about the history of motor sports on a parallel with a round-table discussion. Admittedly some of the misplaced attempts at humour are "a waste of bandwidth" but the greater part of this thread is in accordance with the raison d'être of this forum.

Edited by D-Type, 02 December 2011 - 11:57.


#59 Bauble

Bauble
  • Member

  • 1,040 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 02 December 2011 - 15:03

[quote name='D-Type' date='Dec 2 2011, 08:42' post='5433335']
Why?

Admittedly some of the misplaced attempts at humour are "a waste of bandwidth.???????????????????

I have been accused of mischief, and called a trouble maker amongst other things on this forum. Do I detect another barb aimed at Poor Old Bauble, or am I over sensitive?

'Is this a case of 'if the hat fits ...............' :eek:

Edited by Bauble, 02 December 2011 - 16:54.


Advertisement

#60 Bauble

Bauble
  • Member

  • 1,040 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 02 December 2011 - 15:11

Clearly the '80's are too recent to constitute nostalgia, so I can point out that Nelson Piquet won three World Championship in the decade, with rivals like Prost, Lauda, Senna etc.
and I can only think of John Barnard as Significant Other. The designer everone wanted especially Ferrari.

#61 Nick Wa

Nick Wa
  • Member

  • 148 posts
  • Joined: June 07

Posted 02 December 2011 - 16:50

1950s: Rear engined car (Cooper)

1960s: Monocoque chassis (Lotus)

1970s: Turbo engines (Renault). Aerodynamics, ground effect cars (Lotus). Radial tyres (Michelin)

1980s: Composite materials chassis (McLaren)

1990s and beyond: Computer simulation (FEA, CFD, etc)

The introduction of the turbo engines and ground effect aerodynamics was the technological quantum leap that changed F1.


A very sensible summation.

Admittedly some of the misplaced attempts at humour are "a waste of bandwidth.


So to waste a bit more,

The 50s 1.Raymond Mays.......for single handedly destroying a formula......non attendance in Turin.
2.The Coopers (father & son) for turning motor racing back to front. (Sorry Dr Porsche) or should that read front to back!

Driver Moss....he survived the complete 10 years and helped 2. above in Argentina.

#62 onelung

onelung
  • Member

  • 545 posts
  • Joined: November 07

Posted 02 December 2011 - 23:00

In that spirit, here's my contribution (on what I had most interest) with some unavoidable simplification:


1950s: Rear engined car (Cooper)

1960s: Monocoque chassis (Lotus)

1970s: Turbo engines (Renault). Aerodynamics, ground effect cars (Lotus). Radial tyres (Michelin)

1980s: Composite materials chassis (McLaren)

1990s and beyond: Computer simulation (FEA, CFD, etc)


The introduction of the turbo engines and ground effect aerodynamics was the technological quantum leap that changed F1.

It is fair to say that after the 80s I lost quite a bit track as I had other interests to concentrate on.

I rather like this approach - and in addition to the Michelin contribution might not the technology of tyre compound(s) also be included?
I recall seing a photo of Jim Clark's Lotus on a starting grid (taken from the rear, close up low angle shot ) with caption to the effect that this was the second race in which the tyres were to be run.
Unheard of today of course, and compounds now so sticky at temperature that stones picked up are not flung off and can work their way through to result in tyre deflation.
And now - MotoGP tyres with asymmetric compounds to suit "handed" circuits - :rolleyes:

#63 GrumpyOldMan

GrumpyOldMan
  • Member

  • 98 posts
  • Joined: July 11

Posted 03 December 2011 - 09:15

Just the kind of pointless exercise I like! So here goes:

50’s
Driver – Fangio. How could it be anyone else? 24 wins from 51 races, 5 championships from 7 full seasons and universally acknowledged by his competitors as the benchmark to be measured against
Non-Driver – John Cooper, for moving the engine from front to back. Many other contenders (Neubauer @ Mercedes for ramping up the level of professionalism in the sport, Ferrari for ending Alfa’s dominance and establishing his own, Tony Vandervell for making the breakthrough for British teams) but no-one else had such a long-lasting impact on the sport.

60’s
Driver – Clark. Again, I think this is a simple choice. 25 wins from 72 races, twice champion and deprived of the championship in the final race of the season on another 2 occasions, Indy 500 winner (possibly should have been twice but for issues+ with the organisers’ lap charts) and (like Fangio), almost universally acknowledged as the outstanding talent of his time.
Non–Driver – Has to be Chapman for taking the Cooper revolution further. Introduction of the monocoque chassis, introduction of wings and introducing Ford to F1, plus the aforementioned Indy 500 success

70’s
Driver – Difficult. Possibly Stewart for domination until 73, but that leaves another 6 years where he had no direct impact. Possibly Lauda for his golden period from 74 – 77. Possibly Peterson, for his mercurial talent which awed so many? I’d say Stewart, partly for his on-track exploits but equally for his push towards introducing the concept of safety into F1 in the face of some vitriolic opposition
Non-Driver – Again, a difficult one. How about Ken Tyrrell? Breaking from Matra in 70, then winning championships in 71/73, the 6 wheeler in 76? Bernie Ecclestone? As team owner he ended up with a “dream team” of Gordon Murray as chief designer, Lauda as no.1 driver and Piquet as no.2 at the end of the decade, and combined this with being head banana at FOCA and becoming the de facto “Mr F1”? Chapman again, for the Lotus 72 in the first part of the decade and the lotus 76 – 78 ground effect cars at the end? Maybe Bernie just shades it…

80’s
Driver – Nelson Piquet. Yes, controversial I know. But his record speaks for itself - 3 championships, 2 near-misses, 20 wins, 24 poles and in 3 different eras (ground effect, unlimited power turbo and limited fuel turbo) all against drivers of the calibre of Prost, Lauda, Villeneuve, Mansell’s ego, Pironi, Senna, etc. Could easily make a case for Prost as well (3 championships and 2 near misses and more wins), but Prost’s era only really began in earnest when pure speed was subordinate to the need to “nurse” the car home. Also question marks over his character when the pressure was on (Zandvoort 83 & Suzuka 89 srping to mind).

Non-driver – Tie between Ron Dennis & John Barnard. Dennis for turning McLaren into the dominant behemoth we know today (and winning races in 9 out of 10 years, including the incredible 88 season). Barnard for being the outstanding designer of the decade (even eclipsing Murray).

90’s
Driver – Senna. I wish it could be someone (anyone) else, but his was the defining presence. Whether for the right reasons on-track (Donington 93) or the wrong reasons (Japan 90), or for the legacy of his Imola accident and the track changes it led to, it was almost impossible to mention F1 in the 90’s without mentioning Senna.
Non-Driver – Frank Williams/Patrick Head for their team's dominance 1991 - 1997.

2000’s
Driver – Schumacher. Unfortunately. What a rotten decade THAT was…
Non-Driver – Joint winners: Ecclestone for selling F1’s soul (or what remained of it in the new millenneum), and Hermann Tilke for failing to design a single decent track in his entire career (and assisting Bernie in ruining F1 as a result).

Edited by GrumpyOldMan, 03 December 2011 - 09:16.


#64 Bauble

Bauble
  • Member

  • 1,040 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 03 December 2011 - 14:07

Thank you GOM, for the first comprehensive, and reasoned reply to the original 'poser' (not me you fo.... the question). Of course there is no definitive answer as it is all based on personal opinion, and yours is very valid.

Anybody have anything to add?