Jump to content


Photo

Audi R18 incidents.


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 jatwarks

jatwarks
  • Member

  • 202 posts
  • Joined: August 08

Posted 30 November 2011 - 12:37

Just read the track test of the Audi R18 in Motor Sport, in which Allan McNish attributed the cause of a number of incidents and accidents to two main factors;

1. The poor visibility from the driving seat of the Audi, due to the large front wheels, which caused the driver to completely lose sight of other cars when cornering.

2. The fact that the prototypes were no faster than the GTs on the straights, due to engine restrictions, and yet much faster through the corners. This led to the prototypes 'appearing from nowhere' in the corners, according to the GT drivers.

I would suggest that an equally valid factor would be the lack of engine noise from the approaching turbo-diesel, that would add to the second point above.

Advertisement

#2 cheapracer

cheapracer
  • Member

  • 10,388 posts
  • Joined: May 07

Posted 30 November 2011 - 12:57

1. The poor visibility from the driving seat of the Audi, due to the large front wheels, which caused the driver to completely lose sight of other cars when cornering.


I can see that as a distinct advantage as long as the precaution of telling everybody about it first is taken!

With all the engine and gearing as well as aero restrictions they have in F1, LMP etc I can't see why the need to continue to have the cars so low, it's caused issues/incidents in F1 so why not simply have a minimum height for the driver etc and a more upright driving position for everybody's benefit ..?

I also think it look stupid in Touring Cars with the driver looking like a 12 year old trying to see over the steering wheel...


#3 Ben

Ben
  • Member

  • 3,181 posts
  • Joined: May 01

Posted 30 November 2011 - 18:00

When I started working with decent GT cars about three years ago, a championship winning GT driver said to me that whilst Alan is a nice guy he's a little too on the edge in traffic. This was long before the current engine regs, big front tyres on LMP1 and roofs on Audis.

Ben

#4 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 56,839 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 30 November 2011 - 18:23

He's certainly always had a public image of being good/aggressive in traffic.

Though in endurance racing I wonder how much being 'good' in getting through the other classes is those drivers realising he's in more of a hurry than they are and sensibly letting him have his space.

#5 BRG

BRG
  • Member

  • 11,424 posts
  • Joined: September 99

Posted 30 November 2011 - 21:01

I would suggest that an equally valid factor would be the lack of engine noise from the approaching turbo-diesel, that would add to the second point above.

I would imagine that if you are in a full-face helmet, with radio earpieces, inside a GT car doing 150mph @ 9,000rpm, hearing any other car, whether petrol or diesel, coming is unlikely.

#6 cheapracer

cheapracer
  • Member

  • 10,388 posts
  • Joined: May 07

Posted 01 December 2011 - 02:38

I would imagine that if you are in a full-face helmet, with radio earpieces, inside a GT car doing 150mph @ 9,000rpm, hearing any other car, whether petrol or diesel, coming is unlikely.


No I haven't driven a GT car but know from other vehicles the first thing you notice is the change in resonance when someone else gets close.