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Evolution of LMP design


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#1 Ali_G

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 22:51

This is basically spurred by the new Toyota and how it compares to the old GT-One. Just wonder if people can explain why the following changes have happened.

1. The driver compartment is now much more upright than before. The "nose" in front of it is now not nearly as steep. On the older GT-One is appeared that the nose blended into the windscreen at the same angle with the windscreen merely being a continuation of the nose. I would have though this would have been optimal for aerodynamics.

2. Gullies on the side of the cockpit. More and more these seem to be more pronounced. Is this where the radiator inlet is ? I notice that area entering this area now also exits through a gap on the side of the Toyota TS030. However, this didn't seem to be the case at all on the GT-One.

3. Pronounced drop in bodywork between the front wheel covers and the rear wheel covers. This has been an ongoing trend since the end of Group C. Why not maintain the same height of bodywork between both wheels. I would have thought this was beneficial to aerodynamics. The drop is now more pronounced with the new Toyota.

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#2 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 15:32

Rule changes?

#3 MatsNorway

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:00

3. Pronounced drop in bodywork between the front wheel covers and the rear wheel covers. This has been an ongoing trend since the end of Group C. Why not maintain the same height of bodywork between both wheels. I would have thought this was beneficial to aerodynamics. The drop is now more pronounced with the new Toyota.


If we think wing profile the bigger the height of the profile the more the lift.

So by going down they could possibly achieve low pressure zones only above each wheel arc.

I dunno just guessing.

#4 inox

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 21:06

3. Pronounced drop in bodywork between the front wheel covers and the rear wheel covers. This has been an ongoing trend since the end of Group C. Why not maintain the same height of bodywork between both wheels. I would have thought this was beneficial to aerodynamics. The drop is now more pronounced with the new Toyota.


Although reducing frontal area is most effective way of reducing drag, keeping cross section of the car at minimum from front to back further improves things, as more air can pass through. In Toyota's case there are air channels between cockpit and front wheels. The air passing from here will partially enter the area behind front wheel as it is natural way to go when cockpit reaches it widest part. Going towards the back of the car, the airflow is directed back to the center line of the car, hence it does not hit hard those rising rear wheel covers.

Also, low sides improve center of gravity too.

#5 MatsNorway

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:54

Exellent.

#6 GreenMachine

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 12:07

Also, low sides improve center of gravity too.


Depends on what was inside them before they lowered them I suppose, and where they put it after it was moved... I imagine the difference in the skin weight is pretty trivial.