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Faux brake ducts and exhaust blowing?


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#1 Taxman

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 12:30

Just had an interesting idea while looking at the new exhaust rules, which I thought may be feasible. Anyway I was about channelling the exhaust gasses using 'faux brake ducts'. The exhaust could be pointed directly at these 'faux brake ducts' and rather than channelling cool air to the brakes, channelling hot exhaust gasses directly under or over the diffuser. I'm not sure whether the rules would allow it, but having inboard rear brakes may help separate the exhaust gasses and brake cooling, allowing 'faux brake ducts'.

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#2 MatsNorway

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 17:28

Just had an interesting idea while looking at the new exhaust rules, which I thought may be feasible. Anyway I was about channelling the exhaust gasses using 'faux brake ducts'. The exhaust could be pointed directly at these 'faux brake ducts' and rather than channelling cool air to the brakes, channelling hot exhaust gasses directly under or over the diffuser. I'm not sure whether the rules would allow it, but having inboard rear brakes may help separate the exhaust gasses and brake cooling, allowing 'faux brake ducts'.


Having inboard brakes takes away space, adds weight makes the rear end bigger. complicates the suspension, adds heat to gearboxes, suspension and bodywork.

The brake ducts have spesific limits in size. And they are too far away from the diffuser.

However there has been speculated that blowing the exhaust gases on to some wings mounted on the brake ducts could give considerable gains.

Only issue then is wheelmovement and throttle sensitivity. The car could be a bitch to drive. kinda like EBD without EBD maps.

Edited by MatsNorway, 01 February 2012 - 17:29.


#3 ray b

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 18:02

no inboard brakes by rule they must be in the wheel now

#4 MatsNorway

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 19:01

no inboard brakes by rule they must be in the wheel now

+ that.

#5 jatwarks

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 08:19

Only issue then is wheelmovement and throttle sensitivity. The car could be a bitch to drive. kinda like EBD without EBD maps.

Useful aero effects from exhaust gases are totally dependent on suitable engine mapping; without the latter the former is a non-starter.

#6 scarbs

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 11:25

Just had an interesting idea while looking at the new exhaust rules, which I thought may be feasible. Anyway I was about channelling the exhaust gasses using 'faux brake ducts'. The exhaust could be pointed directly at these 'faux brake ducts' and rather than channelling cool air to the brakes, channelling hot exhaust gasses directly under or over the diffuser. I'm not sure whether the rules would allow it, but having inboard rear brakes may help separate the exhaust gasses and brake cooling, allowing 'faux brake ducts'.

I've had some similar ideas,
here http://scarbsf1.word...-blown-effects/
& here http://scarbsf1.word...gns-and-trends/

Image: http://scarbsf1.file...12_rbd_blow.jpg


#7 MatsNorway

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 16:44

Useful aero effects from exhaust gases are totally dependent on suitable engine mapping; without the latter the former is a non-starter.



They did run without the propper throttle maps i think. it wasn`t easy but i believe Mark Webber was one of them that could manage it.


I've had some similar ideas,
here http://scarbsf1.word...-blown-effects/
& here http://scarbsf1.word...gns-and-trends/

Image: http://scarbsf1.file...12_rbd_blow.jpg


Are you actually saying that going from this:
Posted Image
Who you consider a extreme solution.

to diverting the gases back down again to the floor is feasible?

Because i heavily doubt that is what you are suggesting.

Edited by MatsNorway, 02 February 2012 - 16:50.


#8 scarbs

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 17:42

No, I wasnt suggesting the gasses flow back to the diffuser? Merely blow the brake duct fin for downforce created directly at the wheel.

#9 MatsNorway

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 18:10

No, I wasnt suggesting the gasses flow back to the diffuser? Merely blow the brake duct fin for downforce created directly at the wheel.



ok. I looked like it as you added most of hes ideas about blowing back down onto the diffuser in your quote. btw Taxman blowing the brake duct fins in that way would generate lift on the wheel.

Somebody will try blowing the brake duct fins. At least in testing. It looks like its what Mclaren is going to try with that bulp out there, its at least easy to try from there. Is it as far back as they are allowed?
http://mclarenf-1.co...&...h1=22&ch2=5

Edited by MatsNorway, 02 February 2012 - 18:13.


#10 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 18:38

...blowing the brake duct fins in that way would generate lift on the wheel.

If it generates anything it won't be lift.

#11 MatsNorway

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 19:44

If it generates anything it won't be lift.


In total that would be true. :)

Edited by MatsNorway, 02 February 2012 - 19:45.


#12 Taxman

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 20:53


Thanks for the input so far. :up: I have read Scarbs' article, but my line of thinking was more about diverting or channelling the gasses downwards, using the brake ducts, rather than producing downforce directly at the wheel, as this is just above the area which the teams were feeding the exhaust gasses into the outer section of the diffuser last year.

#13 24gerrard

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 21:24

With current regs, I would think the best use for exhaust gas would be to the underside of the wings
to help the boundary layers to remain attached.

#14 MatsNorway

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 07:56

With current regs, I would think the best use for exhaust gas would be to the underside of the wings
to help the boundary layers to remain attached.



When you put it like that.. there is a bigger surface to work on.. but its less consentratet.