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#1 Tomecek

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 12:11

"It was an absolute no-brainer for [Sebastian and I] to be here," said the Australian.


For non-English speaking, I was always wondering about those [] brackets. Never understood the rules how they are used or what do they mean?

I always thought it's what's not said in quote, but is added there by editor for avoidance of doubt. However, the sentence without bracketed part doesn't make too much sense? :)

Thanks for clarification! :kiss:

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#2 Gareth

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 12:15

Having [plus some words] means that the exact words have been changed (so that the quote makes sense when placed into the article) but that the meaning remains unchanged. So in the quote above, Webber likely said "It was an absolute no-brainer for us to be here," but the editors changed the "us" to "Sebastien and I" as it doesn't change the meaning but makes it clearer to the reader who he was referring to.

Having [...] means an element of the quote has been removed - but, again, it shouldn't change the meaning.

#3 Vitesse2

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 09:11

Having [plus some words] means that the exact words have been changed (so that the quote makes sense when placed into the article) but that the meaning remains unchanged. So in the quote above, Webber likely said "It was an absolute no-brainer for us to be here," but the editors changed the "us" to "Sebastien and I" as it doesn't change the meaning but makes it clearer to the reader who he was referring to.

Having [...] means an element of the quote has been removed - but, again, it shouldn't change the meaning.

Shame they mucked up the grammar by using "I" instead of "me" though. It's quite a simple rule: unless you're speeaking in some sort of cod "Mummerzet" accent, you wouldn't say "It was an absolute no-brainer for I to be here" but "It was an absolute no-brainer for me to be here". Adding "Sebastian and" or even "him and" doesn't magically change it from "me" to "I". Although at least they didn't put "me and Sebastian", which is equally wrong.

#4 Risil

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 10:18

Well, one is a failure to properly decline a pronoun, and the other is simply not following convention. So I don't know about equally wrong... ;)

On the other hand, Cod West Country Press Release of the Week sounds like one of those silly games they play on Midweek Motorsport, so maybe they're onto something. :lol:

Edited by Risil, 05 May 2012 - 10:19.


#5 Vitesse2

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 10:46

Well, one is a failure to properly decline a pronoun, and the other is simply not following convention. So I don't know about equally wrong...;)

My English teacher would have deducted one mark for doing either. :wave:

But then I wuz taught grammer proper, innit? :p

#6 Tomecek

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 22:35

For non-English speaking, I was always wondering about those [] brackets. Never understood the rules how they are used or what do they mean?

I always thought it's what's not said in quote, but is added there by editor for avoidance of doubt. However, the sentence without bracketed part doesn't make too much sense? :)

Thanks for clarification! :kiss:

Many thanks for explanation. Now clear to me!