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May 10th 1967: Lorenzo Bandini at Monaco (merged)


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#1 moody

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Posted 02 March 2001 - 16:23

...I was reading a little bit about him today and I was wondering if there was ever an official enquiry into his accident at the chicane that day in 67. If so is there anywhere i might be able to read it from.
...I have also read on more than one occasion that on that day Lorenzo being described as 'tired and out of sorts', what is the basis for this statement, was there anything going on in his life at that time, trouble at Ferrari perhaps? I have often wondered why he was regarded as not himself that weekend.
...he must have been in pretty good form, or am I wrong? he had a succesful practice and was pushing on at the time of his accident.
...damn those haybales, it was a shameful way to lose such a trier.
..are there any good links to photos of Lorenzo Bandini by the way.
regards everybody
M

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#2 David J Jones

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Posted 02 March 2001 - 17:15

I remember seeing the aftermath of this unfortunate episode on the BBC broadcast of the race.

I will have to recollect my thoughts on this but Lorenzo was aware of his as no1 Italian driver. I will try to see what I can put together from my records.

I well remember speaking with Bandini at Silverstone in 61 and found him a charming and personable guy with no airs and graces.
Although he was subsequently involved in the Mexico incident of 1964 that deprived Hill of the championship I could not think badly of him.

To see that on TV was not pleasant especially as it was so near to the end of the race. Some of the pictures published in the aftermath were awful as well as the tragedy that his wife suffered shortly afterwards (a miscarriage).


#3 David M. Kane

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Posted 02 March 2001 - 17:23

I can't wait to see what David Jones finds. This is strictly off
my memory, but I think it was Ferrari mind games that had him out
of sorts combined with the pressure of the Italian press. I would
also imagine having a pregant wife was also slightly stressful
and a bit distracting.

Before he became a driver, Lorenzo was a mechanic for his wife's father, that is how they met. He basically was from a humble background, so I imagine the politics of Ferrari and the Italian
press were very hard on him. I know it sure would be hard for me!

#4 fines

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Posted 02 March 2001 - 18:01

Terrible fate, to lose your husband and shortly afterwards a child from him (the only?)! :( :cry:

#5 Barry Boor

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Posted 02 March 2001 - 19:15

Although Lorenzo won in Austria in 1964 it was by attrition rather than pure speed. However, I feel very privileged to have seen, live, two of his finest drives.

I was at Monaco in 1965 when he was on fine form all day, and finished a worthy second behind Graham Hill on Graham's finest day.
So ironic that he should lose his life on that same track 2 years later.

Then, at Brands in 1967, he gave me a big fright by getting very close to Dan Gurney at the end of the Race of Champions. Had it not been Dan in the lead I would certainly have been rooting for the Ferrari.

Although I was but 19 years old when he died, I remember him with great affection, and feel that his loss left a huge gap in Italian motor sport that may yet not have been filled.

#6 Keir

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Posted 02 March 2001 - 21:49

As Chris Amon put it, "The Ferrari was quite a big car for Monte Carlo, Lorenzo was chasing Denny around the whole time and in comparison, that Brabham was easy to just throw around." "I was in pretty good shape then and at the end of the race I was totally knackered, poor Lorenzo must have been just as tired."

#7 Gerr

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Posted 03 March 2001 - 00:48

An odd,little known fact about Bandini is he was due to qualify at Indianapolis six days after Monaco. He was to drive a new Gerhardt-Ford for Walter Weir of Saint Louis. The press over here thought that this may have been a prelude to a future Ferrari entry at Indy. Maybe he was under pressure from Ferrari because this venture was not authorized? Did he drive anyone else after joining Ferrari?

#8 Milan Fistonic

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Posted 03 March 2001 - 07:05

Bandini’s accident was described in the Grand Prix Accident Survey published by The Jim Clark Foundation.

… Stewart subsequently retired, leaving Hulme in the lead with Bandini in second place. Denis Jenkinson wrote afterwards, in Motor Sport that by lap 43, Bandini was beginning to get his second wind, and he slowly reduced the gap between the leading Brabham and his Ferrari down to 7 seconds, and it became a trial of strength with the rugged New Zealander coming out on top, but by 70 (of 100) laps, … the deadlock had been broken, Hulme’s superior physical condition obviously coming out on top and poor Bandini was beginning to flag and he began to show signs of tiredness and lack of concentration, occasionally being untidy and ragged on some corners.
On lap 82 when Bandini crashed, Hulme had an advantage of almost 20 seconds. The Ferrari struck the wooden barriers which marked the chicane with the right hand front wheel, and was sent out of control, mounting the straw bales on the outside of the corner. The left rear wheel was broken off, and the car landed upside down in the middle of the road with the driver trapped underneath. The roll-bar was inadequate to support the car. Almost at once, the car caught fire. Marshals smothered it in powder from extinguishers, but they were not equipped with protective clothing and were unable to approach the blaze until it was put out. Bandini was injured in the impact, and his left arm was trapped under the bodywork. The rescuers used ropes to pull the car right way up to get the driver out, but wasted time in pulling it over on its two remaining wheels rather than risk further arm injury and rolling it over the other way.
Fuel continued to pour from the ruptured tanks and even when Bandini had been pulled clear there was enough left to re-ignite when the downdraught from a helicopter fanned the still glowing straw bales along the edge of the track.
Dr Michael Henderson, in his book ‘Motor Racing in Safety’ says of Bandini’s accident, ‘He was trapped because rescue procedure was ill-directed through poor training and equipment. He was incapacitated through sever impact injuries received when the car crashed into the harbour wall – possibly, even, he was unconscious for a time. Due to this incapacitation he was unable to help himself at all. The car became an inferno because of a profuse flow of petrol from aluminium tanks ripped open in the crash. The rate at which a fire burns is directly related to the rate of fuel flow … In common with all other 1967 Grand Prix cars, the Ferrari carried no built-in fire extinguishing system.
This added up to fatal burn injury. But, although the immediate cause of Bandini’s death was from burns, the contributory causes of trapping and impact injury were so important that if they had been eliminated he would not have died.’
Bandini was taken by boat across the harbour with serious burns, and a lung injury. His spleen was removed in an operation, but he died three days later.



#9 fines

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Posted 03 March 2001 - 13:40

Originally posted by Milan Fistonic
The Ferrari struck the wooden barriers which marked the chicane with the right hand front wheel, and was sent out of control, mounting the straw bales on the outside of the corner. The left rear wheel was broken off, and the car landed upside down in the middle of the road with the driver trapped underneath. (..) The rescuers used ropes to pull the car right way up to get the driver out, but wasted time in pulling it over on its two remaining wheels rather than risk further arm injury and rolling it over the other way.

How could they do that, considering the car had presumably lost its right front and left rear? :cnfused:

#10 moody

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Posted 03 March 2001 - 13:57

...looking at what film I have of the crash, the front right wheel remains on the car

#11 maxie

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Posted 03 March 2001 - 17:40

some source says that a wheel (I don't know which one) was thrown into the harbour, while some marshals thought that "the wheel" was Bandini himself ...

#12 Flicker

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Posted 04 March 2001 - 17:30

Hmm...just for reference...
(sorry for such sad pics)

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

Here is a bit larger scans:

http://www.geocities...e/Bandini-1.jpg
http://www.geocities...e/Bandini-2.jpg



#13 David J Jones

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Posted 05 March 2001 - 18:31

I don't think I can add anything about the accident other than the facts already stated in the thread.

looking through what I have it would seem that Bandini was in a reflective mood prior to the race,

Ferrari polotics seemed much to the fore -

Bandini was uptight about the possibility of Scarfiotti joining the team so ..................

He no longer had Surtees to counsel or be guided by and the mantle of Italys no1 plus being the Ferrari team leader is not an easy one.

Scarfiotti was related to the Agnellis

#14 Drinky

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Posted 05 March 2001 - 19:41

A movie of the crash can be found at Farzad's Gallery here:

http://www.farzadsf1...1967bandini.avi

:(

#15 Barry Boor

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Posted 08 March 2001 - 23:19

I just came across this picture of Lorenzo just approaching the chicane on that terrible day.

Posted Image



#16 Buford

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Posted 18 March 2001 - 00:43

An odd,little known fact about Bandini is he was due to qualify at Indianapolis six days after Monaco. He was to drive a new Gerhardt-Ford for Walter Weir of Saint Louis.


Yes that was true. But it had nothing to do with Ferrari. My dad knew Wally Weir. Being a GP fanatic and excited by Bandini's coming, early in May I asked Mr. Weir how he had gotten Bandini to drive for him and he told us he needed a driver and was looking in a magazine and saw a picture of Bandini who he knew little about. He thought, "These foreigners know how to drive these rear engine cars." So he simply found out how to contact him, called him up and offered him the ride and Bandini accepted. It was a low budget, second rate car. Not a quality ride at all.



#17 jj2728

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 20:39

38 years ago today Bandini succumbed to the terrible injuries he suffered during the 1967 Monaco GP. One of my first racing heroes. RIP Lorenzo.

#18 angst

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 00:31

Originally posted by jj2728
38 years ago today Bandini succumbed to the terrible injuries he suffered during the 1967 Monaco GP. One of my first racing heroes. RIP Lorenzo.


A truly horrible and gruesome accident, a brave fight and a sad end to a life that seemed to be coming together in so many ways. RIP Lorenzo.

#19 MCS

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:42

A terrible tragedy.

Forgive me if this has been covered before on TNF (I couldn't find anything), but am I correct in thinking that I read somewhere that Bandini and Amon travelled to Monaco together, having set off from Modena in the early hours of the morning?

Allied to the fact that they then would probably have had little sleep staying in Monaco itself - the inevitable noise at night and, more importantly, the early practice schedules (predominantly for the support races) - and you wonder how tired poor Bandini was even before the race...

Mark

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#20 Keir

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 15:32

There are a number of Bandini and Amon tales on the "Famous Amon" thread. It's well worth the read.

..... and yes, they did travel together to Monaco and it's a tale that is re-told in the book "Forza Amon."

#21 Fr@nk

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 20:45

):

This is a very sad story.
I was too young at the time Lorenzo Bandini died at the "chicane du port", just after the tunnel, but I've read a lot about this argument.
One of better book about Bandini had been written by Franco Lini the former DT of Sefac Ferrari.
Someone was talking about the Bandini stress condition before and during the race.
According with this opinion, Bandini "had to win the Monaco GP" all other results were bad for him.
1967 season have started fine for Lorenzo Bandini, in Sports Car Championship he won the Daytona 24 and the 1000 Km of Monza, but Enzo Ferrari and all italian supporters had been waiting for another Ascari, so the first target for Sefac Ferrari and Lorenzo Bandini, this year, was the F1 World driver's championship.
Enzo Bandini knew Montecarlo track very well.
He liked it.
He took the second place in 1965, behind Graham Hill and before Jacky Stewart, and in 1966, behind Jacky Stewart and before Graham Hill.
Many people, at the time, thought Stewart, Hill and Bandini are the best drivers for Montecarlo G.P.
In this book, very rare, Mr Lini said Bandini and Chris Amon, who race for the first time in Montecarlo, had a very good feeling, they are good fellows.
Lorenzo helped Chris during the practices and they had a nice party on friday night.
Unfortunately, Lorenzo, who took the second time during the practices (just behind Jack Brabham) started badly and Jack Brabham lost a lot of oil during the first lap of the race.
Mr Lini said that Lorenzo was tired when the terrible accident arrived.
Bandini was tired by the track and car conditions -"He was driving badly in the last laps"- Mr Lini said- " his lap's times are not so regular as before".
Bandini was very unhappy, his car frapped a pole and took fire immediately.
Twelve years before, Alberto Ascari negotiated badly the some corner but he went down on the sea and suffered only few injures.
I think Lorenzo Bandini have been the best italian driver after Alberto Ascari's death.

#22 Keir

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 15:57

Frank,
Very nicely put !! Fodder for a film ??

Remember Lorenzo and FORZA AMON

#23 SEdward

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 17:50

Schlegelmilch, who was at the chicane when the accident happened and took some sad photos of the incident, said that Bandini's line through the chicane became more erratic as the race went on.

I suspect that he was tired. He was already a long way behind Hulme when he crashed, so I don't think that he was trying too hard in an attempt to challenge for the lead.

His accident is my very first memory of motor racing. I can remember the black and white pictures on the BBC. I was six years old. I cannot remember anything about motor sport before his accident.

Edward

#24 Bonde

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 23:46

Has there ever been any indication of or investigation into an 'alternative' possibility of a mechanical defect on Bandini's car, for instance such as a duff damper or a slow puncture - both of which, among other defects, might cause an erratic line, but still leave a 'hungry' driver tempted to try to drive around the problem, rather than going to the pits, which even then probably cost you more time at Monaco than at most other tracks?

I suppose a busy calender, long travel hauls (by road), partying, sleepless nights and long races were pretty much standard fare for all GP drivers in those days - I've always wondered exactly why Bandini's accident has been singled out to be attributable to fatigue when there were so many other opportunities for fatigue, with or without attendant accidents, for pretty much all professional racing drivers back then. Was Bandini less fit than his colleagues?

#25 MCS

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 08:24

I was browsing through a large Grand Prix photography book in Motor Books in St.Martin's Court yesterday - can't for the life of me remember what it was called, but it was big - and there was a section on drivers on the day of the race.

Oddly, there was a reference to a lack of sleep and a photograph of Bandini, taken from a balcony, with the Italian looking down at the circuit...

Mark

#26 Keir

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 15:34

To quote Chris Amon, "The Ferrari was a very big car to drive around Monaco and Lorenzo must have been tired, because I was totally exhausted myself." "He was trying to keep up with Denny, who was throwing that little Brabham around like it was a toy."

#27 JB Miltonian

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 18:42

I was browsing through a copy of the new edition of "The Cruel Sport" yesterday, and I was struck by the color picture of Amon driving his Ferrari past the flaming wreckage of Bandini's car. Truly a horrifying image. The race went on. Amon finished third.

#28 David Beard

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 18:59

Originally posted by Bonde
. Was Bandini less fit than his colleagues?


I don't know, but I think fitness should be banned from modern racing. We need a modern Gonzalez.

I seem to recall someone commenting that a 70s driver got his only exercise from lawn mowing. But he had a "ride on" job. Who was that?

#29 Fr@nk

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 19:41

):
Lorenzo was'nt less fit then other colleagues, I think.
Mr Lini described him as a very fast and professional driver.
Lorenzo's good feeling with Chris was well known, both are in very good fitness conditions. The Bandini-Amon was the strongest couple Ferrari Sefac had, Lorenzo drove a heavy car like the P4 Sport Prototype for more than twelve hours at Daytona, so I think his fitness is out of discussion.
Hulme's Brabham was a car easier to drive than Ferrari 312 was.
The hypotesis about a mechanical fault, or a puncture, was refused by Sefac Ferrari and tyre's producer.
I think the most probable cause should be the track condition because Brabham's car oil leak.
Ferrari 312 was a car hard to drive in those conditions, so Bandini and Amon, were tired.

#30 Bonde

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 22:18

Fr@nk,

I did not mean any disrespect for Bandini - I do apologize if that is the impression I gave. I was just wandering if more factors than driver fatigue were involved in his unfortunate, horrifying demise. But as you said yourself, he could handle a P4 for 12 hours without a problem, so Bandini's general fitness must have been excellent.

As for modern driver's fitness - if it's what it takes to make the difference between winning and finishing second they'll go for fitness. A very fit driver also tends to survive injuries better than a less fit person. But I certainly agree it is rather sad that we don't see the diversity of driver physical stature of days gone by. Still, I'm sure that Gonzales was much more fit than his appearence suggested and that he really did have the stamina of a Pampas bull!

#31 Wolf

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 23:42

Originally posted by JB Miltonian
I was browsing through a copy of the new edition of "The Cruel Sport" yesterday, and I was struck by the color picture of Amon driving his Ferrari past the flaming wreckage of Bandini's car. Truly a horrifying image. The race went on. Amon finished third.


Now, that's interesting- old edition (thankfully) didn't have that photo... Wasn't there an old thread on the book? It might be interesting to compare what's been changed over there.

#32 Seppi_0_917PA

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 00:50

The original "Cruel Sport" was published in 1963 in black and white. The reprint is now titled "The Cruel Sport: Grand Prix Racing 1959-1967" The advertising states "The design and photo presentation remain true to the original edition, published in 1963, and are supplemented by a new introduction and epilogue and revised captions." Now we're hearing that they added color photos taken after 1963; I too would like to see the two versions side-by-side...

#33 Fr@nk

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 14:33

Anders,
about the great Gonzales I'm agree with you.
No problems about your post, there's nothing bad about Bandini's fitness, but, in Italy, for long, there was rumours about his physical conditions and more, and I think it is not true at all.
I also think that psychological condition of Bandini was very bad just before and during the race.
Sorry if my answer was too... hard, or if it was seemed.
My english is not so good...
I think Lorenzo Bandini was the best italian driver after Alberto Ascari's era, and he was very unlucky this is the true.
Thank you Anders for your kind post.
Bye

#34 FerrariV12

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 18:38

I don't think Bandini's general fitness was an issue. Basically he was just plain quicker than everyone bar Hulme, who had a much lighter and better handling car. I mean Amon was no slouch and Bandini was two laps ahead of him in the same car (or I would assume since Amon was lapped twice by Hulme and Bandini crashed near the end of the race while not far behind the Brabham). I think he just drove too hard and ran himself into the ground :(

This happened 16 years before I was born so don't take what I said as first or even second hand, just my best guess!

#35 Paolo

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 10:22

In last week's issue of Autosprint, Mauro Forghieri says that he and Bandini traveled together to Monaco.
No mention is made of Amon.

#36 Fr@nk

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 12:13

Dear friends,
I could check on my Franco Lini's book, about Bandini-Amon travel to Montecarlo.
I'm quite sure that Lorenzo and Chris drove two different cars during this travel.
May be Bandini and Forghieri traveled together.
But I think that's no so important as someone could think.
The track's conditions and the Lorenzo's psychological conditions were most important for the accident than a long travel who Bandini, Forghieri and others had few days before !
I haven't read last issue of Autosprint, but about the Bandini's accident I've read a lot, and I've heard many other important interviews : Lorenzo Bandini was overcharged of responsability by italian press and Sefac Ferrari also.
That's the true.
The 1967's season MUST BE the season in which Lorenzo Bandini would be World Champion.
He known it and italian press said that every day.
I was eight at the time, but I remember well my father's friend who was reading about Bandini as "World Champion thirteen years after Ascari".
Montecarlo GP was a really great chance to get the leadership of the World Driver Champs.
Ferrari did'nt race at Kyalami first season's GP, won by Rodriguez, the Ferrari V12 was probably the best engine, and english teams, like Lotus, are in troubles with old and powerless Climax 2.0.
So, I think, Lorenzo had a great charge of responsability, may be a too great one. :cry:
Who really overcharged Bandini ?
He took it by himself or someone gave him that?
Italian press or, as usual, Mr Enzo Ferrari ?

That's the real question, but no one answered it. :confused:

#37 Keir

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 15:37

I'll dash an e-mail off to Chris to see if he can clear up the Monaco travel plans.

As for Hulme and Bandini lapping Amon ! That wasn't the case !! After the crash, Amon slowed right down and really didn't want to continue. He pushed on regardless and his third place was far more the result of a late race puncture than Hulme being faster.

The original version of "The Cruel Sport" might look very tatty compared to the new version.

Photo resolution has come light years since the early sixties and ever poor pictures look good.
It all comes down to digital printing !!

Can't wait to see it !!

#38 Yorgos

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 19:43

Pre-race pressure:
I ran across the following passage in Piero Taruffi's autobiography. I have the English edition,published in 1964. The passage refers to an Italian driver who had a mortal accident:
"...he had reached the most dangerous point in a driver's career: He was the only one left to uphold Italian prestige and all eyes were upon him. The fans, his friends and the Press were all demanding great things. He simply had to win. He had to show that he was better than so many people thought."
Sounds a familiar case? This paragraph was written on Luigi Musso.

Giulio Borsari's memories of that day from Ruoteclassiche "Ferrari che Gente":
Borsari was very close to Bandini ("he was like a brother") and at Monaco that day he was the one who was signalling to him:
"It's easy to say that we should have called him in because he was tired. I knew that he was tired. After a point he was not responding to my signals. He made 10 overtakings and this causes extreme effort. But Monaco was his race. He lost it twice in the past. How could anyone stop him? Who could take the responsibility of excluding him from a possible victory? I hoped that it was a temporary situation and he would recover as had happened in the past. But Lorenzo did not recover and he made the mistake. Later when examining the car, the gearbox was in 5th. He did not downshift exiting from the tunnel, he did not slow down."

Luck/fate: The car manages to hit a boat-tieing barrier and did not finish in the water.

Post incident: 3 minutes in the blaze, TV helicopted going near the flames,making them worse.
Nobody dares extract Bandini.

Fitness issue: The fact that Bandini fought for his life for 3 days in his terrible condition,answers the fitness questions.

Regards
Yorgos

#39 FerrariV12

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 07:28

Originally posted by Keir
As for Hulme and Bandini lapping Amon ! That wasn't the case !! After the crash, Amon slowed right down and really didn't want to continue. He pushed on regardless and his third place was far more the result of a late race puncture than Hulme being faster.


Thanks for clearing this up - so roughly where was Amon in relation to Hulme and Bandini before the crash? Ahead of Graham Hill?

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#40 Mohican

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 10:25

Originally posted by David Beard


I seem to recall someone commenting that a 70s driver got his only exercise from lawn mowing. But he had a "ride on" job. Who was that?


Pretty certain that is a reference to Ronnie Peterson, who was photographed/interviewed in Autosport (prior to the '74 British GP at Brands Hatch) riding his lawn mower.

#41 Mohican

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 10:30

Originally posted by Yorgos
Pre-race pressure:
I ran across the following passage in Piero Taruffi's autobiography. I have the English edition,published in 1964. The passage refers to an Italian driver who had a mortal accident:
"...he had reached the most dangerous point in a driver's career: He was the only one left to uphold Italian prestige and all eyes were upon him. The fans, his friends and the Press were all demanding great things. He simply had to win. He had to show that he was better than so many people thought."
Sounds a familiar case? This paragraph was written on Luigi Musso.


Could also have been on Castelotti, Giunti, de Angelis...

Why are Italian drivers so often underrated, anyway ? Just look at Trulli and Fisichella today.

#42 jpm2

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 11:43

Originally posted by Mohican


Could also have been on Castelotti, Giunti, de Angelis...

Why are Italian drivers so often underrated, anyway ? Just look at Trulli and Fisichella today.


I don't think so. When Castellotti had his mortal accident he was not the only Italian left (there was Musso, for instance); the same can be said of de Angelis (there were de Cesaris, Patrese) and even of Giunti (there were de Adamich, Galli).

There is another important difference. Giunti died in the 1000 kms Buenos Aires (not in Formula one), and Castellotti and de Angelis have died in private testing, far from the eyes of the general public, and with no win to be gained.

The situation of Bandini in 1967 is, probably, similar to the one Musso has experienced back in 1958. Bandini was leading Scuderia Ferrari and, at the time, there was no one else in Italy the inflame the hearts of the tifosi, except for some not so regular appearances of Scarfiotti.

Regards

#43 Keir

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 15:25

Chris sent me an e-mail which clears up the traveling party. It was Lorenzo and himself leaving Modena on Wednesday and after a number of detours, both of them arriving early Thursday morning.

The party that Franco Lini writes about was more of a team dinner where the mechanics were able to attend. Chris mentions that both he and Lorenzo left the dinner early.

As for the fitness issues, Chris states that at the time of Lorenzo's accident, he was freezing cold from lack of body fluid and felt that Lorenzo must have been feeling the same.

I mentioned to Chris that sometimes people who haven't driven a race car really can't understand how hard it really is !!

Losing a liter or two of sweat leaves you quite exhausted !!

#44 Fr@nk

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 20:32

Thanks to Yorgos and others.
I'm very glad that Chris Amon has confirmed the news I've read in Mr Lini's book.
I'v made a check and also in my book I found that both Ferrari's drivers left early the dinner.
I agree with Yorgos about the poor luck of Lorenzo, the post-accident was a nightmare.
Fire-patrol are absolutely not ready, nobody helps Bandini who remained for minutes (!) in the fire.
When he arrived in the "Princess Grace's hospital" he was inconscious and for three days he remained in a emergency room then God loved him and Lorenzo died.
The stories of Musso, Castellotti and Giunti are sadly similar to Lorenzo's one.

#45 SEdward

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 06:43

I think that Lorenzo regained consciousness during his stay in hospital, albeit briefly.

Edward

#46 Yorgos

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 19:28

There is a great little book on Lorenzo Bandini in Italian, by Giacomo Sironi, published in 1997 by Omnia Edizioni. The author was a childhood friend and classmate of Bandini, so the book is an emotional farewell to a friend. There is also an eyewitness account of the accident and interviews of Forghieri and Borsari.

Regards
Yorgos

#47 Teapot

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 22:12

Here's what Enzo Ferrari himself wrote about the Bandini's tragedy in his book "Piloti, che gente" ( I think the English translation is called something like "Drivers I know" ). I know that this is not the right book to read in search of historical truth (Ferrari's point of view was usually very biased), anyway it could help to shed some light on the Bandini's feelings in those days...

" I thought about what had happened the week before the accident. Bandini had told me about his fears. He felt an intense rivalry against Scarfiotti, the other Italian driver of the team. It had been in this way since September 1966, in Monza, the day of his teammate's victory of the Italian GP. His win in the Monza's 1000Km with the P4, few days before the Monaco GP, had reinvigorated this rivalry. He wanted serenity for Monaco, he didn't want to have Scarfiotti teamed with him and he showed me a newspaper that pushed hard the hype of the duel between the two italians. What he didn't tell me was that he saw in Scarfiotti all the things he never managed to achieve. Ludovico (Scarfiotti) was a rich boy, always smiling, who had followed an easy path in his life and saw the sport only as a way to earn something with his own hands. Lorenzo envied his friend, whose racing career had followed such an easy
routine. [...] I decided to satisfy his desire and appointed the young Chris Amon as his teammate. But someone told me that Scarfiotti, instead of training for the Targa Florio in Sicily, was heading to Monaco. When Bandini met him he was shocked: now his only desire was to win the race."

As usually, sorry for the poor translation!

#48 Keir

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 15:42

In answer to an earlier question, Chris was in the top five positions very early on in the race and he certainly would have finished second if not for that late race puncture.

It semed to be a Kiwi festival that day as Bruce McLaren had his own car running third at one point, so it could have been a Kiwi "One, Two, Three."

#49 Billy Sollocks

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 05:44

I found this on a GPL thread, is very sad and graphic. Is an Italian made clip of the weekend of May 6/7 1967 featuring Lorenzo and his wife Margharita. Interviews in Italian (can anyone translate please?)

http://www.the-fastl....ghlight=#57058

#50 Billy Sollocks

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 05:53

..apologies the link isn't working at the moment.