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Forests Of Steel


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#1 Charles E Taylor

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 11:49

For those interested in the technicalities of testing.


http://totallycoolpi...te-of-aviation/


Nothing simulated here!







Charlie

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#2 desmo

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 13:21

Impressive indeed. I hope they aren't in danger of being shuttered, I can't help but worry about the viability of the Russian aviation sector in the Post-soviet era.

#3 Magoo

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 13:35

Funny how standards can change in only a few short years. As I was looking through the photos, I have to admit that among my thoughts was God, what a dump. But in truth, it wasn't very long ago that American industrial facilities could look much like this one.

#4 Paolo

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 14:04

Why the disparaging comments? There is simply no other way to test for fatigue than doing it on the complete airframe. Simulations aren't going to cut it.
This is the normal look of such labs.

#5 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 14:09

There's a definite lack of sheen to Soviet/Russian industrial whatevers.

You'd hope that because they don't bother to repaint their buildings from time to time, all the effort is directed towards more important detail.s

http://www.theatlant...modrome/100297/

#6 Canuck

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 21:19

Posted Image
Erm...there's a short in the harness. In the yellow wire.

#7 hogits2

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 21:56

When were these pics taken?

#8 Tony Matthews

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 23:57

Posted Image
Erm...there's a short in the harness. In the yellow wire.

Anyone who's ever done any data cabling will will be familiar with that sight. Just substitute grey for yellow...

#9 Grumbles

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 21:28

...But in truth, it wasn't very long ago that American industrial facilities could look much like this one.


A smart-arse would reply to this by saying; "What? You mean busy doing stuff?"

But not me...


#10 Magoo

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 22:54

A smart-arse would reply to this by saying; "What? You mean busy doing stuff?"

But not me...


You must have a hole in your glove -- that one went straight through you. I'll try to one-hop them to you from now on.

#11 NeilR

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 02:45

You must have a hole in your glove -- that one went straight through you. I'll try to one-hop them to you from now on.



Is this a baseball or golf reference?

#12 Tony Matthews

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 07:15

I thought it was a reference to dueling with pistols.

#13 Grumbles

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 08:09

You must have a hole in your glove -- that one went straight through you. I'll try to one-hop them to you from now on.


Thanks, I'd appreciate that. That herky-jerky of yours caught me off-guard and stone-fingered..
Though I might study up on this Glossary of Baseball a bit more first.


#14 Magoo

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 10:28

Is this a baseball or golf reference?


I don't know how you folks down under do it, but in conventional golf there is no fielding.

#15 Magoo

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 10:29

Posted Image
Erm...there's a short in the harness. In the yellow wire.


That is the largest dial indicator I ever saw.

#16 Grumbles

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 21:12

I don't know how you folks down under do it, but in conventional golf there is no fielding.


Listen mate, there's a whole lot more to the world than just the USA. In real golf fielding is the most exciting part of the game, mainly because the fielders aren't permitted to use their hands. Fielders need to be both brave and inventive. A hole in one is a completely different thing in "World" golf.


#17 Magoo

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 01:54

Listen mate, there's a whole lot more to the world than just the USA. In real golf fielding is the most exciting part of the game, mainly because the fielders aren't permitted to use their hands. Fielders need to be both brave and inventive. A hole in one is a completely different thing in "World" golf.


You're doing it wrong. You can see how this happens on an isolated island with infrequent contact with civilization.

#18 Tony Matthews

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:09

:)

#19 GreenMachine

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:11

You're doing it wrong. You can see how this happens on an isolated island with infrequent contact with civilization.


You must be a Canadian ... :rotfl:

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#20 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 12:23

Now that's just rude.

#21 Magoo

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 21:49

I can see Canada from my house.

#22 desmo

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 22:22

So can I.

#23 Magoo

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 22:50

However, Canada is due south of my office.

#24 bigleagueslider

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 04:58

For those interested in the technicalities of testing.

http://totallycoolpi...te-of-aviation/

Nothing simulated here!

Charlie


Charles Taylor,

If you've ever worked in the aircraft industry you would understand the real purpose of structural testing (like the examples shown). In the aircraft world, structural designs are qualified primarily by analysis (or "simulation" as you describe it). The purpose of conducting structural tests is simply to validate the analytical model. If the structural test reveals any discrepancies with the analytical results, then the analysis is reworked such that the analysis and test data agree.

As for the huge number of strain gauge wires and bundles, an aircraft structural test can be extremely costly and time consuming. More so if the structure is tested to failure. Repeating such a test is usually out of the question. Since there is usually a fairly high failure rate with strain gauges during a test, huge numbers of strain gauges are normally used to ensure a relevant sample of data points is acquired.

Regards,
slider


#25 NeilR

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 06:13

You're doing it wrong. You can see how this happens on an isolated island with infrequent contact with civilization.



LOL, Oh no, we do play baseball...or at least I beileve some people do, it is one of the fringe sports - sort of an american version of the great British past time of bog snorkling and cheese rolling...perhaps they should call them the World Series of Bog Snorkling to get more cache'?
BTW I too can see Canada - google maps is great.


#26 gruntguru

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 07:21

If I start off due South, I eventually come to the North Pole!

#27 Grumbles

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 07:55

LOL, Oh no, we do play baseball...or at least I beileve some people do, it is one of the fringe sports - sort of an american version of the great British past time of bog snorkling and cheese rolling...perhaps they should call them the World Series of Bog Snorkling to get more cache'?
BTW I too can see Canada - google maps is great.


Baseball schmaseball, Farnarkling is the one true marker of a civilised culture.


#28 Magoo

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 10:43

Baseball schmaseball, Farnarkling is the one true marker of a civilised culture.


Indeed. I still remember the first time I picked up a swatter and stepped onto the emerald sward.


#29 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 12:19



Not a lot of emerald sward visible here, only a fine pair of purple knockers. It pleases me no end that there are still simple pleasures that the peasants can enjoy and that keeps them off the byways whilst intoxicated.

#30 Magoo

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 13:02



Not a lot of emerald sward visible here, only a fine pair of purple knockers. It pleases me no end that there are still simple pleasures that the peasants can enjoy and that keeps them off the byways whilst intoxicated.


Looks vaguely like fennel. There's a circum and chervil, roughly speaking, but no non-rabbits.


#31 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 15:31

The more you look, the less you see.

#32 Catalina Park

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 09:31

Baseball schmaseball, Farnarkling is the one true marker of a civilised culture.


And over in New Zealand...

#33 bigleagueslider

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 03:27

And over in New Zealand...


Here's just one reason baseball is better than farnarkling: In baseball, if the batter complains too much, the opposing pitcher can drill him in the ribs with a 95mph fastball.

In farnarkling, do the rules allow one participant to sucker punch another up-side the head without a verbal warning? And what would be the penalty for such an offense? Would it necessitate full pugilistic reciprocity, or just a purchase of a round of drinks by the offending party?

As a side note, my beloved California Angels major league baseball team has an Aussie pitcher by the name of Rich Thompson. He must be somewhat civilized, because I've never seen him bean a batter on purpose.

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#34 Grumbles

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 11:51

In farnarkling, do the rules allow one participant to sucker punch another up-side the head without a verbal warning?
slider


Allow it? They demand it...


#35 Catalina Park

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 13:36

Allow it? They demand it...

I'm sure Dave Sorenson wouldn't have it any other way.

#36 GreenMachine

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 06:35

As a side note, my beloved California Angels major league baseball team has an Aussie pitcher by the name of Rich Thompson. He must be somewhat civilized, because I've never seen him bean a batter on purpose.

slider


That's right, they have all been accidents. Really.

:rotfl: :rotfl:

#37 Greg Locock

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 10:59

Seriously our road load simulation lab looks more like those photos than it differs. Big difference is ours is covered in asbestos warning stickers.