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Duckhams Adsil


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#1 f1steveuk

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 10:31

I suspect, probably H&S, this is no longer available? Duckhams Adsil was/is I believe an aersol silicon spray, excellent for restroring rubbers, and it could keep a motorbike frame clean for months!

A quick look on the Internetweb makes it look like it is now an item of nostalgia, unless of course you know different?? Hoepfully!!

As well as seeking a source for it, it does frm nostalgia, I encountered the product during my apprenticeship, and found it made the bearings on my kart axles spin much faster, AND helped keep the frame clean, it had a 101 uses to me (probably all wrong!!) and I never did find out what it's real use was. I do recall tins of the stuff at the Tyrrell factory though!

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#2 f1steveuk

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 11:37

I'll answer my own question, it was developed to spray on to the inside of moulds as a release agent, and I think I have found some!

#3 arttidesco

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 14:37

I'll answer my own question, it was developed to spray on to the inside of moulds as a release agent, and I think I have found some!


Not something I have ever heard of, but then I rarely got beyond breaking the heads off nuts and screws when WD40 failed to do what it said on the tin, is it fun putting something back together again ?

#4 f1steveuk

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 14:41

Not something I have ever heard of, but then I rarely got beyond breaking the heads off nuts and screws when WD40 failed to do what it said on the tin, is it fun putting something back together again ?


Best stuff I ever found for keeping my motor bike frames shiny!! WD40 dries "wet" whereas Adsil used to dry "dry", so dust etc didn't stick to it. There's probably a technical term for it!

#5 f1steveuk

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 18:23

Better not to ask about the other 100, then!!



Quite!

#6 Garsted

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 20:16

]
According to this

http://trade.mar.cx/US73094393

they never renewed the trade mark. It could be that this

http://www.artfact.c...-1-c-2hk14ilc67

is your last chance to get some (along with some nails & 17 tins of paint !)

Pity really, it sounds like good stuff.

Steve


#7 RS2000

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 21:41

I only remember Duckhams Dry Spark, a sort of WD40 equivalent. The cans were less prone to leaking or siezing, compared to period WD40. They used to dish out boxes of it for 70s International rallies, along with large quantities of all their other products. By the 80s you just got 5 litres of Hypergrade...

#8 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 06:42

Several manufacturers make a similar aerosol 'dry lube' CRC do and I think WD40 do too. I use for door strikers and checks, door glass to make it slide in the tracks again, bonnet hinges and the like.No mess like any other product. Good stuff but I have yet to have to paint in the sprayed area. Then I may curse it!!

#9 Charlieman

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 15:03

Products like Back to Black contain a fair amount of silicone and you don't get much slippery than silicone. It is ideal for installing rubber bushes or window seals and is inert to the rubber. However if it gets near any surface that needs to be painted, you've got a lot of rubbing down and wiping to cope with. I would not suggest using it to polish a bike -- you wouldn't be able to pick it up.

#10 f1steveuk

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 15:11

Products like Back to Black contain a fair amount of silicone and you don't get much slippery than silicone. It is ideal for installing rubber bushes or window seals and is inert to the rubber. However if it gets near any surface that needs to be painted, you've got a lot of rubbing down and wiping to cope with. I would not suggest using it to polish a bike -- you wouldn't be able to pick it up.


I used to spray it on a cloth and just wipe the bits of black frame that showed. I don't now though!

#11 Bloggsworth

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 19:33

Choose the silicone-free or you'll never again be able to stick anything withing 100 yards of where you sprayed!

#12 GMACKIE

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 22:17

Good old glycerine is good on rubber, particularly as a lubricant. It doesn't contain silicone, and excess can be washed off with good old water.

#13 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 16:43

What about 3 in 1 too??