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#1 RDV

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 10:00

Building the Rolls-Royce Trent engine....

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#2 gruntguru

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 01:54

Terrific. I learned a lot.

"Each (turbine) blade delivers as much power as a formula one engine."

#3 GreenMachine

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 11:46

Rolls were always good at mythmaking (not to say the myths are without any substance) and that is a typical puff piece.

The QF32 experience shows a different side to RR, and between the design and QC failures they nearly managed to kill an A380-load of people, and the 'duck for cover' RR response contradicts any protestations about caring for the people who entrust their lives to RR powerplants. Damned poor show chaps :down:

#4 MatsNorway

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 17:15

Might as well use this thread..

Im surpriced by the level of usage of cranes at rolls royce. Is there a crossover point when for instance car manufacturers decides to create a assembly line vs manually mounting and building of everything.

i would love to get some info in such a evaluation. In the workshop there is 100% manual labour now.

#5 Greg Locock

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 00:15

Might as well use this thread..

Im surpriced by the level of usage of cranes at rolls royce. Is there a crossover point when for instance car manufacturers decides to create a assembly line vs manually mounting and building of everything.

i would love to get some info in such a evaluation. In the workshop there is 100% manual labour now.


Not quite that simple. At say Lotus, when we were building 8 cars a day, each assembly guy worked on a car for about an hour before it was pushed along to the next guy, so it was pretty much like building a car in a rather spacious and well equipped home garage.

By the time the rather larger jump to 80 cars a day, then you are starting to get towards a true production line, with a moving line.

At 500 cars a day you use a lot of robots, in an effort to reduce repetitive strain injuries. With a cycle time of 3-5 minutes the guys are limited to a maximum lift of 10 kg (I think, it could be as low as 7 or as much as 15)(Chassis assembly is multistation, so you build one a minute but the guys work on the same car for several minutes)

Those are the datapoints I know of. You should read The Machine that Changed the World.


#6 RDV

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 17:14

...and the beat goes on. Watch out for Skynet...

#7 MatsNorway

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 19:10

...and the beat goes on. Watch out for Skynet...


Thats very impressive.

But surely when parts become to heavy to lift like most trainparts when do you look into automation?

#8 CSquared

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 20:20

Thats very impressive.

But surely when parts become to heavy to lift like most trainparts when do you look into automation?

I'd think it just comes down to cost (which includes time) per unit. I worked on an automotive assembly line years ago that was partially automated, partially manual. It had nothing to do with repetitive strain or weight of the parts (we had manually-controlled cranes for engine blocks).

#9 gruntguru

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 23:56

...and the beat goes on. Watch out for Skynet...

After seeing that, would you ever want to buy a car built by humans?

#10 MatsNorway

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:07

After seeing that, would you ever want to buy a car built by humans?


Robots are superior and i want a car buildt by one. But.. did they glue the sides on the bmw on??? Not a fan..

#11 Tony Matthews

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:55

Nothing wrong with glue.

#12 gruntguru

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:39

Robots are superior and i want a car buildt by one. But.. did they glue the sides on the bmw on??? Not a fan..

I remember seeing some "goo" going on at one stage. I guessed it was just seam sealer prior to spot welding. OTOH it may have been glue prior to spot welding - or just glue. . . and yes I agree with Tony - "nothing wrong with glue"

#13 MatsNorway

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:14

I remember seeing some "goo" going on at one stage. I guessed it was just seam sealer prior to spot welding. OTOH it may have been glue prior to spot welding - or just glue. . . and yes I agree with Tony - "nothing wrong with glue"


So what happens when i start to weld in a roll cage? Do you get glue that doesn`t mind getting hot??

Edited by MatsNorway, 13 February 2013 - 12:17.


#14 Canuck

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 00:56

The obvious answer is to glue it in ;-)

#15 RDV

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 14:28

30 year old technology makes F1 pale into insignificance...

#16 Terry Walker

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 15:40

Now all we need is a video of the robots on the production line manufacturing robots...

#17 MatsNorway

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 15:55

I have allways wondered how they make those insanely presise lathes and mills.. How you go about making something with presision lower than 0.001mm

#18 Kelpiecross

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:16

I have allways wondered how they make those insanely presise lathes and mills.. How you go about making something with presision lower than 0.001mm


I was once shown a CNC milling machine that claimed an accuracy of one thousandth of a degree but the operator said that due to the flexibility of the bits etc. the accuracy was nothing like as good as this.

#19 Canuck

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 05:45

Typically anything with a tolerance this tight is ground, not cut - as the "tree" portion of the blades were.

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#20 RDV

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 10:27

Terry Walker- Now all we need is a video of the robots on the production line manufacturing robots...

...wait for the Singularity.. :eek:

#21 Canuck

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 21:26

...wait for the Singularity.. :eek:

Skynet is already here. http://www.army-tech...res/feature1527

#22 gruntguru

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 22:51

Typically anything with a tolerance this tight is ground, not cut - as the "tree" portion of the blades were.

Perhaps because the tolerance is approaching (or better than) the surface finish?

#23 scooperman

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 22:21

I have allways wondered how they make those insanely presise lathes and mills.. How you go about making something with presision lower than 0.001mm


Here is a paper describing the design and then build of a CNC five-axis tool and cutter grinder. I was very interested in Chapters 4 and 5, how they designed and built big damped structures.

Principles of Rapid Machine Design

#24 Canuck

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 02:41

Thank you!

#25 Bloggsworth

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 23:11

Rolls were always good at mythmaking (not to say the myths are without any substance) and that is a typical puff piece.

The QF32 experience shows a different side to RR, and between the design and QC failures they nearly managed to kill an A380-load of people, and the 'duck for cover' RR response contradicts any protestations about caring for the people who entrust their lives to RR powerplants. Damned poor show chaps :down:


And of course, they are the only company ever to have done this...