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What's happened here to Henry's bent eight?


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#51 Magoo

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 13:45

Will you be around Motor City on October 14 or 15, Maguire?

It would be nice to catch up as I head through there...


far as I know I will be, but I am seldom scheduled firmly that far in advance. Let's touch base as time nears.


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#52 h4887

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 19:22

The "internals" are full size? How can this be?


Never heard of the Tardis?


#53 fredeuce

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 01:35

It's only the castings that are 1:3, all the internals are full size, hence the lovely sound.


Somehow I don't think so.

The smallest piston in the full size flathead (not the V8-60) was 3 1/16" in. diam. Later flatheads went to 3 3/16" in. diameter pistons. Many builders seeking performance gains over bored and would sometime go to 3 3/8" . Some special builds have gone beyond that.

This means the collective diameters of all full size pistons would be at least 12 inches. Those rocker covers by my eye are not 12 in. length but closer to 6 in. The internal dimensions would likewise need to be scaled down.

#54 Peter Leversedge

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 08:13

Trouble was a lot of blocks would "fall through" before you got to 3 3/8"
I had no problems with a "99" block - maybe they were thicker in the walls than some of the later blocks

#55 Tony Matthews

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 08:38

Somehow I don't think so.

Neither do I.

#56 Magoo

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 09:12

Somehow I don't think so.


Stick to your guns. I feel you are on solid ground here.


#57 Tony Matthews

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 09:20

:)

#58 Catalina Park

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 10:20

:drunk:

#59 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 03:02

Trouble was a lot of blocks would "fall through" before you got to 3 3/8"
I had no problems with a "99" block - maybe they were thicker in the walls than some of the later blocks

And a lot of modern engines strike water at 30 thou, not 300+ thou!! Probably why they are LOT lighter than the old sidevalve.

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#60 Ray Bell

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 23:39

Yep...

That's why the Biante Series cars were allowed to run NASCAR blocks... they couldn't find a block they could bore safely.

Also, for older engines, I believe the more temperate climate in Australia has left a lot of iron-headed engines thinner in the bores over the years. Whereas in America and Europe the use of anti-freeze (with its attendant anti-corrosive properties) was commonplace, here your old Dodge truck got tap water - on a good day. Dam water otherwise.

#61 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 08:43

Yep...

That's why the Biante Series cars were allowed to run NASCAR blocks... they couldn't find a block they could bore safely.

Also, for older engines, I believe the more temperate climate in Australia has left a lot of iron-headed engines thinner in the bores over the years. Whereas in America and Europe the use of anti-freeze (with its attendant anti-corrosive properties) was commonplace, here your old Dodge truck got tap water - on a good day. Dam water otherwise.

Yes I think we have had this discussion before. I have found imported blocks are far less rusty than our home grown.Far too many are very rusty. Though using Nascar blocks in Muscle Car is more for horsepower than getting blocks. Nascar blocks are stronger though generally no thicker. in fact often lighter.Or at least a Chev is.
All blocks should go .030 with no dramas. I try to use .020 these days. Nascar/ Super car blocks though are in very short supply these days as Supercars [Chevs] use an orphan short deck block and Nascar is pure race engine these days. 360 Sprinters are / were using those blocks as they are supposed to be production GM blocks.I dont quite understand how that equates to a special race block.
And dam water, they got water that was advailable, even salt water, water from a puddle. Even Coca Cola!! That kept the farm trucks moving.

#62 Magoo

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:36

For those of you (see above, you know who you are) who actually care about stone age Yank Tanks, here's the latest Car Spotter's Guide at Motor City Garage: the 1932 to 1942 Chevrolet passenger cars.

In this series, dozens and dozens of original factory photos and renderings are used to illustrate the differences in years and models. Why? MCG takes the view that the venerable skill of car spotting, so prized by society today, is not strictly God-given; it can also be learned.

MCG Car Spotter's Guide to the 1932 to 1942 Chevrolet | Mac's Motor City Garage.com



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Edited by Magoo, 07 November 2012 - 00:44.


#63 Magoo

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 17:31

One thing I've learned at Mac's Motor City Garage that maybe surprised me a little: Gearheads LOVE operating model engines. Sure they're neat, and I certainly enjoy them myself, but I didn't really foresee how hot the interest would be.

(If people have theories about why that may be, please share them. I find the question intriguing.)

But anyway, the interest is especially great for engines with a healthy sound -- the more like the real thing, the more people like 'em. So here's a quarter-scale flathead V8 by Ron Colonna that folks are probably going to enjoy a lot.

Check it out here:

Miniature Flathead V8 rumbles like the real thing | Mac's Motor City Garage.com


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#64 Magoo

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 11:52

Oh, and since this came up earlier to some controversy, the bore and stroke are one inch by one inch.

#65 desmo

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 15:43

Sounds surprisingly like a full scale engine. I expected a higher pitched less throaty sound but really why should I have? I wonder how much research has gone into studying the acoustic properties of engines from an aesthetic rather than a strictly noise reduction standpoint? Seems to me like something Americans would do for some reason.

#66 Greg Locock

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 02:35

Sounds surprisingly like a full scale engine. I expected a higher pitched less throaty sound but really why should I have? I wonder how much research has gone into studying the acoustic properties of engines from an aesthetic rather than a strictly noise reduction standpoint? Seems to me like something Americans would do for some reason.

At most two SAE papers a year. The Japanese occasionally get into it in a big way.

In the eighties and nineties there was a lot of work done on engine harshness, which was typically caused by exciting the torsional and bending mode of the crank at the same time, a bit like pressing two adjacent piano keys, but worse. A crankshaft bending damper was one cure, retuning the TV damper another. It is pretty easy to do by ear, but usually the engine durability boys want some say in the TV tuning.

I can think of a couple of other examples where subjective engine noises get attention - the case of the V8 that wouldn't rumble, and the turbo exhausts that blew raspberries (you can probably guess what that was).

I also had some reasonably definitive recordings of engines that had top spec mains and big ends, vs those with wide open bearings.

Falcon, briefly, had a 12 counterweight crankshaft which I helped design (actually ISVR in the UK did the balance design), that went into production solely to improve the sound of the engine. I think it lasted for two years before being cost reduced out.

This is the secret weapon for engine noise development, the binaural head isn't necessary, but the real time filtering /synthesis software is the biz.

http://www.head-acou.../nvh_hms_IV.htm



#67 Wolf

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 03:15

Desmo, didn't that documentary about McLaren road car feature the sound engineer being brought to help design the sound they wanted?

(On a more or less related note, I stopped paying attention to anything from car industry, as well as those ghastly car shows on TV after seeing a piece on Audi's 'smell department' where they tested and designed the smell of a new car, tested how different materials smelled when combined and when exposed to heat, &c and finally went around the car sniffing around like a bunch of hound dogs- that was the last straw for me... It would be bad enough that they were doing something like that, but bragging about it?!? FFS!)

#68 Magoo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 03:42

http://www.popularme...e-roar-11291754




#69 Greg Locock

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:07

http://www.popularme...e-roar-11291754

Indeed. Camry has a mufffler bypass valve as well!

here's the latest on a project started by a friend of mine 25 years ago, in which he synthesised the sound of a corvette synced to the throttle pedal and rpm of a little Citreon http://www.greencarc...-engineeri.html - looks like it hasn't really found a home yet.



#70 desmo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:35

Funny isn't it that cars and motorcycles sounded better before all this marketing department inauthenticity?

#71 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:36

Uncanny!

My father had a binaural tape recorder, may have been Hitachi, the headphones had microphones in each earpiece, and a polystyrene head was included with a threaded insert in the neck for mounting on a tripod. You could use either this ghostly interpretation of a human or walk around wearing the 'phones. I borrowed it for the British GP at Silverstone in about 1983, the playback was stunning, but could have been better, as I had a tendency to swivel my head to follow the cars visually, which sometimes gave rather confusing results aurally. I have no idea where the tape is, and of course, no tape player.

Look at this old disc I found! It says Bluray or something, no idea what that is - what's it supposed to do?

Edited by Tony Matthews, 12 November 2012 - 07:57.


#72 Magoo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:25

Funny isn't it that cars and motorcycles sounded better before all this marketing department inauthenticity?


In cars they've done their best to eliminate road, wind, and mechanical noise, producing - arguably - a sterile driving experience for enthusiasts. Got to replace it with something.

Personally, I like it quiet when driving a contemporary car. I'm listening to the stereo.

#73 Magoo

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 21:28

Another miniature engine by Ron Colonna -- Harley Panhead:


http://www.macsmotor...like-a-big-one/



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