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'Golden age'


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#1 Dunc

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 20:10

For most nostalgists it's almost universally accepted that the Senna/Prost era is seen as an age when everything was great in F1.

But while on the 'Tube' the other day I stumbled across this clip from Top Gear in 1989:

Both the host, whose name I don't know, and Tiff Needell criticise the state of F1.

To those nostalgists who, unlike me, can remember that time, did it seem at the time like F1 was as good as the nostalgia industry suggests?

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#2 kayemod

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 20:45

For most nostalgists it's almost universally accepted that the Senna/Prost era is seen as an age when everything was great in F1.


Stand by, I think that quite a lot on here will dispute that opening statement.


#3 elansprint72

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 20:55

Stand by, I think that quite a lot on here will dispute that opening statement.

Me for one; that period was of no interest whatever, compared to the immediately preceding "era". :rolleyes:

#4 D-Type

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 20:56

When this sort of question has been asked previously, I've generally answered "The golden age was when you were in your mid teens" on the basis that at that age you were old enough to understand what it was all about, young enough that it was all new, young enough to still be able to enthuse, yoing enough to not be distracted by things like the opposite sex, exams, studying or earning a living. It's also at the age where you absorb things like a sponge. I can remember who won every race in the early sixties, Grands Prix and Sports Car Championship races (Admittedly at that time there were fewer of each). But, although I watched every GP, I can scarcely remember who last year's winners were - let alone which races they won. There's also another golden age which is the period from just before you wee born until about when you started school - simply because that's when the writers you read in your teens were in their teens and developing their enthusiasm.

I don't think the Senna/Prost era really stands out. It was a period of competitive racing with a variety of cars and a group of talented drivers before the long run of Schumacher/Ferrari dominance. But there were several before that. Each era had different facets that made them particularly interesting, but you generally only recognise what they were when looking back a few years afterwards when time has allowed a sense of perspective to develop.

I'm sure other forum members will disagree.

Edit: Kayemod, I've deliberately avoided going into the Senna/Prost era at length.

Edited by D-Type, 27 August 2012 - 21:00.


#5 mikeC

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 20:59

Stand by, I think that quite a lot on here will dispute that opening statement.


OK - I'll jump in with both feet :rotfl: That was the era which finally put me off Grand Prix racing; I haven't watched F1 since...

#6 scheivlak

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:01

For most nostalgists it's almost universally accepted that the Senna/Prost era is seen as an age when everything was great in F1.

But while on the 'Tube' the other day I stumbled across this clip from Top Gear in 1989:

Both the host, whose name I don't know, and Tiff Needell criticise the state of F1.

To those nostalgists who, unlike me, can remember that time, did it seem at the time like F1 was as good as the nostalgia industry suggests?

Err....where on this nearly 11 minute clip? I see basically only something about junk parts and the Sierra.

#7 elansprint72

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:09

I was disappointed not to find anything about the propulsion system of Chinese boats...

"... Sent to do a report on a junk sail." :rolleyes:

#8 arttidesco

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:10

The great William Wollard is the presenters name you do not know.

Assuming one means by golden age an age in which more than one or two teams were in with a realistic challenge for race and championship victories, I'm afraid I may be alone in thinking what ever the drivers may have contributed, and with out wishing to belittle anyone's achievements, the McLaren Honda package made races all too predictable, at the time, for the late 80's to early 90's to be considered a golden age.





#9 Allen Brown

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:20

Stop feeding the troll.

#10 E1pix

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:38

Stand by, I think that quite a lot on here will dispute that opening statement.

Yep.

Me for one; that period was of no interest whatever, compared to the immediately preceding "era". :rolleyes:

Yep, though I'd modify to "less interest" for me.

When this sort of question has been asked previously, I've generally answered "The golden age was when you were in your mid teens" on the basis that at that age you were old enough to understand what it was all about, young enough that it was all new, young enough to still be able to enthuse, yoing enough to not be distracted by things like the opposite sex, exams, studying or earning a living.

I don't know if you were involved Duncan, but we had a discussion a year or so ago suggesting this very thing. I'm almost convinced that what's "Golden" for most all of us is when our first live exposure came. For us lucky enough to have been kids (my first race was at 3, making 2012 my 50th year of unwavering addiction), it was the '60s and '70s for exactly the reasons you described. My first GP was in '76, for me that was the era though I followed it in print for nearly a decade already. I'm quite sure if I was 20 years older I'd say "the '50s," or whenever my first live exposure was. We all know that tv exposure can't compare. I loved the late-'80s as well, mainly for the engine diversity, but once Prost and Senna were on the same team sportsmanship went to the dumper in my view.

I personally think this very topic would be thread-worthy. :up:

As far as the OP's comment of 'best ever,' I hadn't ever heard then as being it.

#11 WhatOh

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:41

When this sort of question has been asked previously, I've generally answered "The golden age was when you were in your mid teens" on the basis that at that age you were old enough to understand what it was all about, young enough that it was all new, young enough to still be able to enthuse, yoing enough to not be distracted by things like the opposite sex, exams, studying or earning a living. It's also at the age where you absorb things like a sponge. I can remember who won every race in the early sixties, Grands Prix and Sports Car Championship races (Admittedly at that time there were fewer of each). But, although I watched every GP, I can scarcely remember who last year's winners were - let alone which races they won. There's also another golden age which is the period from just before you wee born until about when you started school - simply because that's when the writers you read in your teens were in their teens and developing their enthusiasm.

I don't think the Senna/Prost era really stands out. It was a period of competitive racing with a variety of cars and a group of talented drivers before the long run of Schumacher/Ferrari dominance. But there were several before that. Each era had different facets that made them particularly interesting, but you generally only recognise what they were when looking back a few years afterwards when time has allowed a sense of perspective to develop.

I'm sure other forum members will disagree.

Edit: Kayemod, I've deliberately avoided going into the Senna/Prost era at length


:clap: :clap: Brilliant post - but any reason why you avoided going into the Senna/Prost era in detail? I would like to hear your views.

#12 Michael Ferner

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:44

For most nostalgists it's almost universally accepted that the Senna/Prost era is seen as an age when everything was great in F1.


That's the first time I hear (or, rather, read) such a suggestion. So, "universally accepted" is certainly nonsense.

Having said that, the "Senna/Prost era" was the last I really enjoyed following, it all went rapidly downhill for me from there on - not only in F1. But, "Golden Age"? I don't think so. I concur wit Duncan here.

#13 jj2728

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:49

Well, I'm a few years past "Golden Aged" so thankfully I'm old enough to remember when I was young enough...........where was I?

#14 Dunc

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 21:52

Contrary to what someone else said, I'm not trying to troll, I'm just interested because of my lack of knowledge.

There is a massive amount of nostalgia for the Senna/Prost years, with the impression often given that it was some kind of golden age of F1. I'm too young to remember much of it, (I started watching F1 in 1993) so I'm just seeking the views of people who were there at the time because the best way to find out the truth about history is to consult primary sources.

#15 MWiklund

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 22:03

Being 64 at this time I feel fortunate to have come of age in the 60s and early 70s when F1 and CanAm were something special.

PS You can also add F5000 to that list.

Edited by MWiklund, 27 August 2012 - 22:04.


#16 D-Type

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 22:09

:clap: :clap: Brilliant post - but any reason why you avoided going into the Senna/Prost era in detail? I would like to hear your views.

I felt there were two distinct questions:
(1) When was the "golden age"?
(2) Was the Senna/Prost era it?

Having elected to answer the first question, I felt it better to avoid the second as others would answer it.

My view: Suzuka 1990 was the lowest point in the history of motor sport with Senna cynically and deliberately crashing into Prost in a premeditated move. So I simply cannot consider that era to be a "golden age"

Edited by D-Type, 28 August 2012 - 17:41.


#17 kayemod

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 22:09

Contrary to what someone else said, I'm not trying to troll, I'm just interested because of my lack of knowledge.

There is a massive amount of nostalgia for the Senna/Prost years, with the impression often given that it was some kind of golden age of F1.


I really can't agree with that statement, where are you finding all this 'nostalgia for the Prost/Senna era'?

Also, I have to respectfully disagree slightly with D-Type, there's rather more to favourite eras than age. I've long been fascinated by the 1930s, which was a long time before I was born, otherwise, for me the 1970s were the most interesting, both for the racing and from a technical point of view.


#18 LittleChris

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 22:19

Are we referring to the Senna / Prost era from 1988 ( which wasn't particularly interesting in my opinion due to McLarens dominance ) or the Senna Prost Mansell Piquet Rosberg etc etc Turbo era from 1985 - 1987 ( which I thought was fantastic )

#19 E1pix

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 22:20

... I started watching F1 in 1993...

This is what I would have guessed, per D-Type's theory of "golden" that I backed up.

Per those 20 years younger, I feel their pain. They missed out. :(

Being 64 at this time I feel fortunate to have come of age in the 60s and early 70s when F1 and CanAm were something special.

PS You can also add F5000 to that list.

:up: Geez, I almost said the very same thing. Can-Am starting in '67 for me, live, was Life itself — as was F5000 the next year (both at Road America). :)

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#20 Doug Nye

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 23:26

Hmm - talking with so many friends and contemporaries, the same - regretful - sentence keeps recurring. It goes "Yes...we certainly saw the best of it...".

And that was long before either Senna or Prost first sat in any form of racing machine...though much of what both could do would not have been out of place 'there'.

DCN

#21 king_crud

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 10:38

Are we referring to the Senna / Prost era from 1988 ( which wasn't particularly interesting in my opinion due to McLarens dominance ) or the Senna Prost Mansell Piquet Rosberg etc etc Turbo era from 1985 - 1987 ( which I thought was fantastic )



Agree. People seem to think Senna/Prost was some sort of vast and fantastic era, it lasted three seasons only, and two of those were domination by one team.

#22 Allan Lupton

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 10:42

Hmm - talking with so many friends and contemporaries, the same - regretful - sentence keeps recurring. It goes "Yes...we certainly saw the best of it...".

And that was long before either Senna or Prost first sat in any form of racing machine...though much of what both could do would not have been out of place 'there'.

DCN

Yes quite - got interested about the time Prost was born and saw my first GP practice session (couldn't afford to go to the race) when he was 3½ well before Senna's birth.

#23 Kingsleyrob

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 11:06

When this sort of question has been asked previously, I've generally answered "The golden age was when you were in your mid teens" on the basis that at that age you were old enough to understand what it was all about, young enough that it was all new, young enough to still be able to enthuse, yoing enough to not be distracted by things like the opposite sex, exams, studying or earning a living. It's also at the age where you absorb things like a sponge. I can remember who won every race in the early sixties, Grands Prix and Sports Car Championship races (Admittedly at that time there were fewer of each). But, although I watched every GP, I can scarcely remember who last year's winners were - let alone which races they won. There's also another golden age which is the period from just before you wee born until about when you started school - simply because that's when the writers you read in your teens were in their teens and developing their enthusiasm.

That's nicely put, D-Type. And valid for me plus or minus a couple of years either way.

I look back fondly on the sixties, but was the racing really that good? I think apart from the racing, the off track characters such as Rob Walker, Colin Chapman, John Cooper, and Ken Tyrrell added to the charm. Plus the emergence of driver/constructor teams with Jack, Bruce, and Dan. And here's another plus point of the era - I could go to Oulton Park and see Jim Clark on three wheels around Cascades - and get his autograph. Then see him step into his Formula 1 Lotus.

I think the safety - or lack of it - also elevated our heroes into gladiators. We didn't really know who was going to survive a season.

I certainly wouldn't label the Senna/Prost era as "golden" but it did have some, er, interesting aspects.

As LittleChris points out, the Senna/Mansell/Piquet/Prost/Rosberg seasons did offer something a bit special.

Rob :wave:


#24 Amphicar

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 11:53

I posted this last November (on one of the much missed Bauble threads): http://forums.autosp...a...t&p=5417564

Seems to fit the bill here too!

#25 Ray Bell

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 12:11

Like kayemod, I'm fascinated by the thirties...

Like Doug, I have heard the expression, "We saw the best of it!" a multitude of times... and know it to be true.

Like some others, I enjoyed the Rosberg, Mansell, Senna etc era, but I fail to see how a season in which one car can win 15 out of 16 races could be notably nostalgic.

#26 Paul Parker

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 12:13

That's nicely put, D-Type. And valid for me plus or minus a couple of years either way.

I look back fondly on the sixties, but was the racing really that good? I think apart from the racing, the off track characters such as Rob Walker, Colin Chapman, John Cooper, and Ken Tyrrell added to the charm. Plus the emergence of driver/constructor teams with Jack, Bruce, and Dan. And here's another plus point of the era - I could go to Oulton Park and see Jim Clark on three wheels around Cascades - and get his autograph. Then see him step into his Formula 1 Lotus.

I think the safety - or lack of it - also elevated our heroes into gladiators. We didn't really know who was going to survive a season.

I certainly wouldn't label the Senna/Prost era as "golden" but it did have some, er, interesting aspects.

As LittleChris points out, the Senna/Mansell/Piquet/Prost/Rosberg seasons did offer something a bit special.

Rob :wave:


The problem with the 'Golden Age' perception is that it is inevitably subjective and dependent upon the observer's opinions/circumstances etc.

I agree with Kingsleyrob in general, but would remind him of the fantastic dices in F2 in period, some of the best racing I have ever seen. Meanwhile GP racing (or F1 if you prefer) in the 1960s was too often a victim of mechanical frailty and race results were skewed as a result (Monaco 1968 was perhaps one of the low points, there being only 5 cars running after less than 20 laps, 5 due to accidents and 6 with mechanical breakages). However if you had a driver with one of the best cars, a light touch, finesse and superior skills then you were quids in, thus Jim Clark.

Additionally as Kingsleyrob recalls, there was easy access to the drivers in the paddock and the ability to see the action close to, unlike today. The impression I have from memory is that there was more racing, less delay and more enjoyment to be had. In my opinion the aesthetics of modern, professional motor sport, with rare exception, is sterile, remote and frequently unfriendly, not forgetting the enormous costs of simple attendance. Driving standards too are or were a problem, personally I abhor the deliberate aggression and baulking which thankfully seems to be more under control these days.

For many years I attended the British GP, starting as a 15 year old for the 1964 Brands Hatch race which I commuted to by London Underground, British Rail and bus, which was easy and relatively inexpensive. The racing was exciting and the viewing of course excellent. My last British GP at Silverstone in 2002 as a photographer with press/track pass for the Historic Race was characterised by the extreme hostility of FIA officials who even long after the final race of the day would not allow anybody to leave the infield via the emptying F1 paddock unless they were FIA accredited. I was actually threatened by one such 'official', very nice. Even the marshals were stroppy, possibly due to the pressure of official diktats. We were treated like dogshit. My press/track pass of course only allowed me access trackside during the historics, nothing else and even then you were so far from the action in most areas that you needed at least a 300mm lens, although 400 or more would have been preferable. God knows what the punters could see.

My own 'Golden Age' would be the late 1950s/60s although some of the 1970s GPs were pretty damn good, as were the 1970/71 sports car races, whilst acknowledging that safety issues and ever increasing speeds must be taken into account.

Nowadays, again with rare exception, as far as I am concerned watching F1 online or by TV is far better than actually attending, perhaps am I too old and jaded.

#27 Roger Clark

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 14:02

The Golden Age of Grand Prix racing started on 26 June 1906 and ended on 9 December 2007.

#28 kayemod

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 14:08

And here's another plus point of the era - I could go to Oulton Park and see Jim Clark on three wheels around Cascades - and get his autograph. Then see him step into his Formula 1 Lotus.


This should really be in the 'paddock shots' thread, but I've only just found and scanned it, and it illustrates Kingsleyrob's point perfectly.

Posted Image

It's from 1968, I'd just seen Jackie Stewart win the Oulton Gold Cup. I ducked under the rope 'barrier' into the paddock, tried to look as if I belonged there, not too easy when you're a lanky teenager, and got this pic of Jackie and Ken Tyrrell, JYS clutching the trophy itself.

I took this on an Olympus 35 compact of some kind, it could even have been the Kodak Retinette I had before that, on Agfa CT100 slide film. The slide has held up well over 44 years, just scanned it on my Nikonscan LS-50. I'm in the wrong thread again, should be in the photographic one, but any suggestions for minimising the slight crazing in the sky areas. I'll do a bit of work on this when I get a moment, I'm sure I can improve it somehow.


#29 Paul Parker

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 16:07

This should really be in the 'paddock shots' thread, but I've only just found and scanned it, and it illustrates Kingsleyrob's point perfectly.

Posted Image

It's from 1968, I'd just seen Jackie Stewart win the Oulton Gold Cup. I ducked under the rope 'barrier' into the paddock, tried to look as if I belonged there, not too easy when you're a lanky teenager, and got this pic of Jackie and Ken Tyrrell, JYS clutching the trophy itself.

I took this on an Olympus 35 compact of some kind, it could even have been the Kodak Retinette I had before that, on Agfa CT100 slide film. The slide has held up well over 44 years, just scanned it on my Nikonscan LS-50. I'm in the wrong thread again, should be in the photographic one, but any suggestions for minimising the slight crazing in the sky areas. I'll do a bit of work on this when I get a moment, I'm sure I can improve it somehow.


The way things were.

Wonderful.

#30 nicanary

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 16:21

The way things were.

Wonderful.


What's that green stuff Ken Tyrrell's standing on? Not up to Bernie's standards you know, gives the wrong impression. How d'ya get an Arab prince to invest in the sport if you make him stand on things like that? It's unnatural.

P.S. If we're supposed to hark after the era when we were teenagers, how come I yearn for the 50s when I was born in 1950? Subliminal, or summat?

#31 john aston

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 16:30

The golden era ..hmmm....dunno when it started for you but it did for me when I first saw a GP car - JYS ' Tyrrell on opposite lock at Lodge in 1971. It ended when the bloke in the pub or the woman at work who knew nothing whatsoever about my sport started telling me their views on the last race and terming it- ughh- 'Eff one' . The peak of my golden era was 1986 - and the beginning of the end was the last lap of Brands Hatch GP - turbo monsters on a circuit with both elevation and close access for Joe Public. Les temps perdu....

#32 nicanary

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 17:00

The golden era ..hmmm....dunno when it started for you but it did for me when I first saw a GP car - JYS ' Tyrrell on opposite lock at Lodge in 1971. It ended when the bloke in the pub or the woman at work who knew nothing whatsoever about my sport started telling me their views on the last race and terming it- ughh- 'Eff one' . The peak of my golden era was 1986 - and the beginning of the end was the last lap of Brands Hatch GP - turbo monsters on a circuit with both elevation and close access for Joe Public. Les temps perdu....


Yes, it's no longer "ours", it's now viewed by anyone with a satellite dish and a baseball cap on the wrong way. Bernie's marketing worked, unfortunately. On a modern F1 forum they're asking the old chestnut "The greatest drivers...etc", and I refuse to take an active part. One poster questioned how many "podiums" Alberto Ascari achieved...... that's how much they know about the past. Sigh.

#33 john aston

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 18:04

Yup , and the mouthbreathers also use 'podium' as a bloody VERB..World's gone mad.

#34 nicanary

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 18:13

Yup , and the mouthbreathers also use 'podium' as a bloody VERB..World's gone mad.


Whole new vocabulary now.. Eff-wun, Pee-four, he's podiumed at last . I actually like Martin Brundle (I'm also from the county Noel Coward called "very flat"), but he's given in to the Bernification of the sport - I supposed he's toeing the line to keep his job. Awful. Why do I watch? I suppose I love it too much.

P.S. Congrats to BCE for his recent nuptials. Let's hope she keeps him on his toes :rotfl:

#35 BRG

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 19:07

Whole new vocabulary now.. Eff-wun, Pee-four, he's podiumed at last . I actually like Martin Brundle (I'm also from the county Noel Coward called "very flat"), but he's given in to the Bernification of the sport - I supposed he's toeing the line to keep his job. Awful. Why do I watch? I suppose I love it too much.

P.S. Congrats to BCE for his recent nuptials. Let's hope she keeps him on his toes :rotfl:

I keeping with the point on new vocabulary, should you not have said that Bernie has nuptialed?

Let's hope she takes him for every penny that he still has after the former Mrs E was finished with him.

As for the Golden Age, I am not sure we have reached it yet.

#36 arttidesco

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 19:31

The Golden Age of Grand Prix racing ended on 9 December 2007.


Was that the night the then reigning President of the FIA got caught in the presence of multiple mistresses wielding paddles with his pants down bearing a red posterior to the NOTW cameraman hiding in the cupboard ?

#37 pete53

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 19:32

Additionally as Kingsleyrob recalls, there was easy access to the drivers in the paddock and the ability to see the action close to, unlike today. The impression I have from memory is that there was more racing, less delay and more enjoyment to be had. In my opinion the aesthetics of modern, professional motor sport, with rare exception, is sterile, remote and frequently unfriendly, not forgetting the enormous costs of simple attendance.

Agreed. My attraction to the sport came not just from the actual racing but from the associated "aesthetics" of motor sport in the 1960s, when I first started attending races. The circuits, the smell, the drop of the union flag, the old style pit rows, the type of cars that were racing, etc. I now find the whole racing business , at least at the top level, sterile, soulless and corporate, and consequently it leaves me rather cold. That's not to say that on occasions a modern F1 race doesn't excite me when I watch on the box, but I no longer have any wish to attend.

So, my "Golden Age'" is the 1960s. As D-Type suggested, that might simply be because my motor racing baptism corresponded to me being a certain age, but I still have this sense that the sport has lost something with the advance of modernity.

#38 Charlieman

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 19:42

My first Formula One race was the Silverstone GP in 1979. It was a fairly uneventful race except for delivering the first Williams victory. That made it a memorable race.

It was followed by the historics race. Cor, what a spectacle AND spectators had free access to the paddock after the race. Earlier supporting races were for the British Saloon car championship and one of the F3 championships.

I dunno what a spectator gets at a current F1 event on race day but I doubt they get that variety. On that day in July 1979, I saw a glimpse of lots of "golden ages".

---
I think that the post-Senna/early-Schumacher era was a fascinating one. Two Williams drivers, Damon Hill and Jacques Villeneuve, were interesting blokes, willing to share an opinion. They weren't and aren't no marks.

#39 Michael Ferner

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 22:10

Like some others, I enjoyed the Rosberg, Mansell, Senna etc era, but I fail to see how a season in which one car can win 15 out of 16 races could be notably nostalgic.


Unless you were a McLaren fan in the day! :clap: :clap: :clap: :D

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#40 scheivlak

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 22:21

Unless you were a McLaren fan in the day! :clap: :clap: :clap: :D

You were?

#41 Michael Ferner

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 22:29

Always been since I first laid my eyes on an M23 :smoking:


(and would have been even earlier if I had been able to take in the sublime beauty of an M7 at age 1! :D)

#42 Doug Nye

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 22:37

I mentioned this "seen the best of it" business to some non-racing people at a function this evening, and they asked me to specify. "What was the best of it then...?

OK, so what has been "the best of it" for you?

For me I think it was - in general terms - seeing F1, F2 and sports cars in combat on the old hedge-lined Nordschleife - plus 917s balls to the wall through Burnenville at Spa - plus a World Championship-level Targa Florio - plus a W154 being driven pretty darned quickly by a World Champion around the unaltered Sudschleife. OK, plus larkin' about in other people's proper cars when such larkin' about was still unspoiled by petty regulation "for my own good".

DCN

#43 scheivlak

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 22:38

(and would have been even earlier if I had been able to take in the sublime beauty of an M7 at age 1! :D)

Now we're talkin' about some Golden Age! :D



#44 john aston

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 06:42

I mentioned this "seen the best of it" business to some non-racing people at a function this evening, and they asked me to specify. "What was the best of it then...?

OK, so what has been "the best of it" for you?

For me I think it was - in general terms - seeing F1, F2 and sports cars in combat on the old hedge-lined Nordschleife - plus 917s balls to the wall through Burnenville at Spa - plus a World Championship-level Targa Florio - plus a W154 being driven pretty darned quickly by a World Champion around the unaltered Sudschleife. OK, plus larkin' about in other people's proper cars when such larkin' about was still unspoiled by petty regulation "for my own good".

DCN



Mr Nye I am profoundly envious; if I had one motor sport wish it would be to have seen and heard Nino Vaccarella et al on the Targa....

#45 E1pix

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 07:13

Now we're talkin' about some Golden Age! :D

Yeah, if we're talking favorite "Golden Age" chassis, for me all built between 1970-78, then:
1) Ferrari 512M



2) Porsche 917/30K, 917

3) McLaren M20

4) Lola T332C

5) Ferrari 312T3 (note Avatar :) )



6) all the other period cars I miss so bad. :cry:






#46 kayemod

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 07:50

Now we're talkin' about some Golden Age! :D


Or at any rate, on an M7 a light yellowy-orange.


#47 Ray Bell

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 09:11

I have to say, the M7 was a good choice...

But the car that really hits me is the Brabham BT33. Absolutely fabulous in form, the blending of the wings into the body, all of it.

Mind you, I have no complaints about the M23 at all, nor the Lotus 72. But the 'traditional' shape that comes through in the M7, the Eagle and the BT33 is something that we never saw again.

#48 Wirra

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 09:32

Basically any period pre-wings.

My favourite rear-engined openwheeler.

Posted Image



#49 E1pix

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 09:59

Hello, Bauble! :wave:

Yep, tarnished silver here but gilding up nicely.

#50 plutoman

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 11:48

I broadly agree with D-Type in that anyone's 'Golden Era' tallies with their early interest in the sport. That roughly means 1978 - 1982 for me. However, each era has it's good and bad points, including the Senna-Prost years. However, I still prefer the look of the cars from around 1967 (Lotus 49, Eagle Weslake etc). Whether that means it was any better in those days is debatable, as the grids were pretty thin at times.