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Does GP2 foster hotheads for F1 rookies?


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#1 F1ultimate

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 07:57

Anyone who has watched a GP2 race knows how exhilarating it is watching drivers in spec cars driving on the edge. But sometimes the exhilaration spills over from racing to outright chaos with drivers disrespectful to fellow drivers and their championship campaigns.

One aspect many drivers struggle with is playing the long game i.e not treating every race start as 200m race against Usain bolt. An F1 race is longer 200m with the exception of Monaco where the order out of the first bend is a good indicator of the finishing order. However, on most circuits there are plenty of joy to look forward by taking a civilized approach to getting off the line.

Overtaking is a more difficult one as very few master the art of it, and the spirit of over-optimism what GP2 enables because of its leniency in penalties. If you can get away with something then why not do it? Carrying that mentality with you to F1 is a bad mistake. Surely you can get away with it because the "rookie" title allows it, but after half a season you should know the limits of the track, the car and your own ability. In order words you should have common sense and good judgement.

Is GP2's leniency harming talent and F1?



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#2 DarkknightRises

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 08:08

Anyone who has watched a GP2 race knows how exhilarating it is watching drivers in spec cars driving on the edge. But sometimes the exhilaration spills over from racing to outright chaos with drivers disrespectful to fellow drivers and their championship campaigns.

One aspect many drivers struggle with is playing the long game i.e not treating every race start as 200m race against Usain bolt. An F1 race is longer 200m with the exception of Monaco where the order out of the first bend is a good indicator of the finishing order. However, on most circuits there are plenty of joy to look forward by taking a civilized approach to getting off the line.

Overtaking is a more difficult one as very few master the art of it, and the spirit of over-optimism what GP2 enables because of its leniency in penalties. If you can get away with something then why not do it? Carrying that mentality with you to F1 is a bad mistake. Surely you can get away with it because the "rookie" title allows it, but after half a season you should know the limits of the track, the car and your own ability. In order words you should have common sense and good judgement.

Is GP2's leniency harming talent and F1?


hell, back then kimi and alonso got into F1 with fewer CV under them~~~ i think its just too easy now for these youngster to make their way into motorsport...they are lacking appreciation, respect and pride as a F1 driver!!

#3 F1ultimate

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 08:14

The GP2 finale in Abu Dhabi 2011 was a prime example how drivers get away with crossing runway areas and ramming rivals in ways that would be outright shocking in F1.

#4 ensign14

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 08:19

There are a number of factors - there are three key ones though.

1. The FIA's attitude to Senna and Schumacher's cheating was reprehensible in the extreme and led to those in lower formulae aping their idols' behaviour. I remember Eddie Irvine being stripped of a Formula Ford title because he punted a rival (Jonathan Bancroft) into the pitwall; the local authorities showed more testicular fortitude there than the FIA ever has. A fish rots from the head.

2. There are too many routes up. In the past it was fairly simple. The cream of FF went to F3, the cream of F3 to F2; a real pyramid to be scaled. And the lack-of-talents would be found out fairly quickly (just have a look at the flotsam in F2 and F3k - the likes of Max Busslinger or Giuseppe Bugatti who could blag their way so far) and moved aside. Now a mediocrity in FF can go into F3 or GP3; a mediocrity in those can try GP2 of FRenault of various flavours. Too many places. In a sense that's not a bad thing, it means a decent talent has more of a chance of finding a spot, but it does mean that the mediocrities float to a higher level than hitherto. I mean, good God, when will the penny drop that Rodolfo Gonzalez or Ricardo Teixeira will never make a racing driver?

3. It's safer. Mario Andretti commented that sprint cars rarely flipped when doing so was fatal, but when rollcages came in it was commonplace. A tightrope walker can risk a lot more if there's a safety net. In a lower formula perspective there used to be a Darwinian elimination of the more dangerous drivers. At the very least Johnny Hotshoe might be dissuaded by the odd broken limb if not permanently rendered hors de combat. Encourages Playstation Racing.