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Reuleaux triangular shaped wheels


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#1 Ali_G

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 20:16

Purely a logical question.

I was thinking of how a reuleaux triangle shaped wheel could be used instead of a circular wheel. Is there a simple way to adjust the cars axle or to have some sort of unusual mounting between the axle and the wheel to allow a reuleaux triangle to work instead of a circular wheel.

The only problem from what I can tell is that the point where the axle meets the wheel would need to keep adjusting depending on what part of the wheel is in contact with the surface. I'm guessing the axle would need to trace an almost triangular path around the centre of the wheel to maintain the vehicles constant rideheight.

Obviously there would be severe wear issues given the shape of the wheel but that would be beside the point :)

Edited by Ali_G, 03 September 2012 - 20:18.


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#2 desmo

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 20:51

Upsides?

#3 Magoo

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 21:36

The main drawback I see with a Reuleaux-shaped wheel is its disturbing lack of roundness. Traditionally, roundness is an appealing attribute in a wheel. In my view, the best way to correct this problem would be to subtly alter the profile of the circumference so it is just like a Reuleaux wheel, except round. This would give the configuration all the advantage of the Reuleaux wheel with none of the shortcomings. The best of both worlds, if you will.

#4 Magoo

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 21:42

google Poul Anderson.

#5 Ali_G

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 22:25

Upsides?


None I can think of. Just wondering would there be an easy engineering solution to this.

#6 gruntguru

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 23:17

Upsides?

Racing? Perhaps it would be lighter than a circular wheel.
Could worn-out Wankel rotors be recycled as wheels?

#7 Grumbles

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 09:29

The main drawback I see with a Reuleaux-shaped wheel is its disturbing lack of roundness. Traditionally, roundness is an appealing attribute in a wheel. In my view, the best way to correct this problem would be to subtly alter the profile of the circumference so it is just like a Reuleaux wheel, except round. This would give the configuration all the advantage of the Reuleaux wheel with none of the shortcomings. The best of both worlds, if you will.


This is exactly the sort of narrow-minded "this-is-the-way-it's-always-been-done" attitude that's killing US innovation. A more forward looking nation (like say, Canada, or Nigeria) would recognize immediately that to make it work would require only two trivially simple operations: firstly every road in the country would need to be reprofiled to allow the vehicles axles to follow a straight locus. This would be achieved with the utmost simplicity by merely using Reuleaux road rollers. And secondly, every vehicle would have to be fitted with "wheels" of a standard size. Traction would be greatly improved, and aquaplaning would be a thing of the past with the built-in drains of the new roads.
Sheesh, it's not rocket science...

Edited by Grumbles, 04 September 2012 - 09:30.


#8 Magoo

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 11:16

This is exactly the sort of narrow-minded "this-is-the-way-it's-always-been-done" attitude that's killing US innovation. A more forward looking nation (like say, Canada, or Nigeria) would recognize immediately that to make it work would require only two trivially simple operations: firstly every road in the country would need to be reprofiled to allow the vehicles axles to follow a straight locus. This would be achieved with the utmost simplicity by merely using Reuleaux road rollers. And secondly, every vehicle would have to be fitted with "wheels" of a standard size. Traction would be greatly improved, and aquaplaning would be a thing of the past with the built-in drains of the new roads.
Sheesh, it's not rocket science...



And it's so obvious once you explain it. I don't know why I didn't grasp it. No excuse, really.

#9 munks

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 16:08

This is exactly the sort of narrow-minded "this-is-the-way-it's-always-been-done" attitude that's killing US innovation. A more forward looking nation (like say, Canada, or Nigeria) would recognize immediately that to make it work would require only two trivially simple operations: firstly every road in the country would need to be reprofiled to allow the vehicles axles to follow a straight locus. This would be achieved with the utmost simplicity by merely using Reuleaux road rollers. And secondly, every vehicle would have to be fitted with "wheels" of a standard size. Traction would be greatly improved, and aquaplaning would be a thing of the past with the built-in drains of the new roads.
Sheesh, it's not rocket science...


And I suppose intersections could be replaced by giant lazy susans. You enter when aligned with the intersection's profile, and then just drive off when you are aligned with the exit of your choice. I believe this would reduce the risk of collisions at intersections.

#10 BRG

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 17:38

The Mythbusters TV show experimeted with SQUARE wheels, so maybe we should ask them to try this as well?

#11 Grumbles

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 22:25

And I suppose intersections could be replaced by giant lazy susans. You enter when aligned with the intersection's profile, and then just drive off when you are aligned with the exit of your choice. I believe this would reduce the risk of collisions at intersections.


You sir, have the mind of a genius. It would be irresponsible not to implement this as soon as possible.


#12 John Brundage

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 23:42

You sir, have the mind of a genius. It would be irresponsible not to implement this as soon as possible.

It sounds like we are reinventing the wheel. Next you will tell me that the lazy Susan will resemble a record player and they will use it for trains too.



#13 Ali_G

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 10:22

The Mythbusters TV show experimeted with SQUARE wheels, so maybe we should ask them to try this as well?


The whole thing though is that the wheel wouldn't be turning around a fixed axle, rather the meeting of the wheel and axle would be adjustable to allow for the varying rideheight caused by the shape of the wheel.

Just interested to see if it could be done.

Edited by Ali_G, 05 September 2012 - 10:23.


#14 OfficeLinebacker

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:24

The whole thing though is that the wheel wouldn't be turning around a fixed axle, rather the meeting of the wheel and axle would be adjustable to allow for the varying rideheight caused by the shape of the wheel.

Just interested to see if it could be done.

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Edited by OfficeLinebacker, 05 September 2012 - 12:24.


#15 gruntguru

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 00:59

The whole thing though is that the wheel wouldn't be turning around a fixed axle, rather the meeting of the wheel and axle would be adjustable to allow for the varying rideheight caused by the shape of the wheel.


Perhaps the axle could be isolated from the chassis by a spring and a damper?

#16 Grumbles

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 07:36

Or allow the axle to move freely vertically, and support the car (via springs and dampers) via a roller that rides on top of the "wheel". The roller/cam follower should follow the contours of the road. No idea how to deal with the oscillating unsprung mass of the wheels and axles.

#17 saudoso

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 11:27

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:confused:

google Poul Anderson.



#18 Magoo

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 15:04

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#19 GrpB

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 16:03

Paddle tires for bikes, buggies and rails used on sand approximate various polygonal shapes that are intentionally, effectively non-round, and when driven on pavement have very strange characteristics and motions. In that kind of application perhaps the baseline of a circular wheel and tire carcass is not the ideal. The logical end of a paddle tire is to eliminate the round tire completely so that only paddles remain, although this might be similar in effect to speedboats that barely have the buoyancy to float when not planing. The tire-less 3 paddle drive system might work ok from, say 20 mph up, but perhaps it wouldn't be possible to get to that speed from a standstill because the first revolution of the paddle drive would simply kick the axle up vertically without any forward motion, and it would shake itself to bits before it got to 20 mph. I would call this the Sam Clemen's Drive, more suitable for use on water than land.

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#20 Woody3says

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 16:26

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:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: classic!!!