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Any good F1 related book recommendations?


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#1 PretentiousBread

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:43

I'm going on holiday soon and could do with a good book to take with me, anyone got any recommendations?

Thanks :)

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#2 gm914

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:45

The Nostalgia Thread is the place to be. :up:

#3 Peter Perfect

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:50

I remember enjoying The Mechanics Tale by Steve Matchett.

#4 Nonesuch

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:51

I recently read and enjoyed 'Chequered Conflict' by Maurice Hamilton about the 2007 'McLaren Spygate' season: http://sidepodcast.c...n-kindle-review

#5 SR388

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:51

Flat out; Flat broke

#6 SpartanChas

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:55

Jackie Stewart's autobiography is a good read. David Coulthard's too.

#7 spacekid

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:56

Martin Brundle's 'Working The Wheel' is a good read.

#8 PretentiousBread

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:57

Thanks for the suggestions, keep 'em coming :)

#9 LateApex

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:59

Against Death And Time

World Motor Racing Circuits. It's kind of a large size book though; better for coffee table.

Ayrton Senna: As Time Goes By

Edited by LateApex, 20 September 2012 - 19:02.


#10 MightyMoose

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 18:59

Good offerings so far, I'll add these for consideration:

The book on Tommy Byrne by Mark Hughes (Crashed & Byrned) was pretty good in most peoples minds.

If you fancy going back for a spot of history, why not get the 1982 season book by Christopher Hilton, so much occurred there it's got to be considered for a film given recent F1 interests.

Rapid Response - Steve Olvey - Indycar/CART version of Sid Watkins - personally I found his book more engaging than Sids offerings.

Depends on who/what makes you keep turning the pages!

#11 SR388

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:00

Go like hell.

#12 PretentiousBread

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:03

Martin Brundle's 'Working The Wheel' is a good read.


Think this is the winner so far! I love Brundle's insight and dry wit, but I'm also really fascinated by the technical side of what it is to be a racing driver, so I think this ticks all the boxes. I'll have a look at all the suggestions though, no harm in getting a couple of books.

#13 Watkins74

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:12

A way to go might be a book that is from the past but can give you an insight about the present.

I am thinking of "Meine Story", the Niki Lauda autobiography that has things about Bernie, Luca, Ron Dennis etc. when they were younger. As an example it might be interesting for you to read how Ron Dennis treated driver contract negotiations.

Whatever you pick it's nice to hear people still read books. Will it be an actual book or a kindle?  ;)

#14 Sakae

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:12

Perhaps you could try:

Going Faster!: Mastering the Art of Race Driving: The Skip Barber Racing School [Paperback]

It has some good explanation on choosing race-lines through corners, etc. (pro and cons); really good teaching material for understanding basics of taking it on the road. Danny Sullivan wrote foreword.

Edited by Sakae, 20 September 2012 - 19:14.


#15 BullHead

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:13

Yeah. All the mentioned ones really.
In the name of Glory is a good one too.
Brundle's is an easy and lighthearted read, so for a holiday, i'd say yeah go with that one.

#16 SR388

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:16

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#17 PretentiousBread

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:18

A way to go might be a book that is from the past but can give you an insight about the present.

I am thinking of "Meine Story", the Niki Lauda autobiography that has things about Bernie, Luca, Ron Dennis etc. when they were younger. As an example it might be interesting for you to read how Ron Dennis treated driver contract negotiations.

Whatever you pick it's nice to hear people still read books. Will it be an actual book or a kindle? ;)


It's one of those book contraptions, with pages that you turn, and I heard its battery never runs out so I won't even need a charger, sweet!

#18 Longtimefan

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:27

Memoirs of a Racing Man - Jo 'The Legend' Ramirez
Life at the Limit - 'The Prof' Sid Watkins
Beyond the Limit - ditto

JYS's autobiography is good but far too little F1 and far too much name dropping and back patting.


#19 midgrid

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:33

I can personally recommend, in addition to several already mentioned (assuming you want to stick to manageable paperbacks for holiday reading):

Richard Williams's biography of Enzo Ferrari.

Gerald Donaldson's biographies of Gilles Villeneuve, Juan Manuel Fangio and James Hunt.

The Lost Generation by David Tremayne and Adam Cooper's biography of Piers Courage, both available in small-format paperbacks after initially being published as illustrated, large-format hardbacks.

Jo Ramirez's and Alex Zanardi's autobiographies.

Inside the Mind of the Grand Prix Driver by Christopher Hilton.

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#20 Bruce

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 19:51

I recently read - and enjoyed - "The Limit" (life and death on the 1961 Grand Prix Circuit) by Michael Cannell. A good book, but a little Phil Hill-centric.

#21 MustangSally

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 20:27

I also enjoyed the Niki Lauda book . . . considered controversial at the time. (1980s)

If you like F1 history, there's Nigel Roebuck's 'Grand Prix Greats'. A lot of guys in there before my time but still fascinating anecdotes about people like Bernd Rosemeyer.

I'm also told that Keke Rosberg's book is quite good and he doesn't talk so nicely about Williams. He was never politically correct. But last time I looked on Amazon, it's hard to get a reasonably priced copy.


#22 RealRacing

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 20:58

Ayrton Senna's Principles of Race Driving

#23 Snic

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 21:27

Go like hell.


+1

Although it's not strictly about F1, it gives a fascinating insight into the early history of Ferrari under Enzo, and the intense battle he had with Henry Ford to win Le Mans. In those days F1 wasn't as insular as it is now, so there's lots of great quotes and stories about Surtees, Phil Hill, Andretti & Mclaren.

Read almost the entire book on a flight during the summer, easy reading :)

btw SR388, I don't think the old saying about not judging books by their covers counts for that one...

Edited by Snic, 20 September 2012 - 21:31.


#24 SR388

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 22:22

+1

Although it's not strictly about F1, it gives a fascinating insight into the early history of Ferrari under Enzo, and the intense battle he had with Henry Ford to win Le Mans. In those days F1 wasn't as insular as it is now, so there's lots of great quotes and stories about Surtees, Phil Hill, Andretti & Mclaren.

Read almost the entire book on a flight during the summer, easy reading :)

btw SR388, I don't think the old saying about not judging books by their covers counts for that one...


I really loved it. It's not super technical but it is well written and engaging.

#25 swerved

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 22:32

Some good suggestions, I can tell you one thats worth avoiding imo, The Pits, by Beverley Turner, seldom has a book been so aptly named.

To me it comes across as written by a woman who entered a room full of men, and was disappointed that none took an interest in her.

#26 Madera

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 22:34

This:

Posted Image

If you can find it.

Edited by Madera, 20 September 2012 - 22:36.


#27 dgsg

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 23:16

I remember enjoying The Mechanics Tale by Steve Matchett.


I liked the 1st 3/4 of the book too. I think someone else finished it for him.

#28 Zippel

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 23:37

JYS's autobiography is good but far too little F1 and far too much name dropping and back patting.


And a chapter devoted to his pet dogs.

Some books that haven't been mentioned:

Who Do You Think You Are . . . Michael Schumacher? by Ian Stafford I thought was excellent for what he set out to do. Namely to become the best driver he can and setting out to beat the best in Michael Schumacher by enrolling in all sorts of events/training schools and getting tips from some of the best in the world from all sorts of disciplines. Its all tongue in cheek stuff.

Senna Versus Prost by Malcolm Folley was pretty good and I liked the fact he researched many perspectives from the present and not archives.

Williams: The Legendary Story of Frank Williams by Maurice Hamilton was decent. I thought it brushed over way to many important moments but has some great insight from many of those involved with the Williams team over the years, especially thoses like Patrick Head whose openness can be quite amusing (perhaps unintentionally).

#29 gm914

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 00:22

Go like hell.

Go Like Hell was great. Picked it up for something like $2 in NYC a couple of years ago. Have never enjoyed my commute on the subway so much.
Highly enjoyable.

#30 milestone 11

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 01:05

Some great books mentioned here.
Highly recommend,
To Hell and Back (meine story).
For the Record.
Second Time Around.
The Art and Technicalities of Grand Prix Driving.
Flat Out Flat Broke.
Life at the limit.
Pretty much all Gerald Donaldson stuff.

For the most entertaining though, you have to venture into the world of two wheels.
Ring of Fire. (Just brilliant)
Supermac. ( Phillip McCallen biography)

Avoid at all costs.
Winning is Not Enough. Possibly the worst book I have ever read on motorsport.
Mansell. Almost as bad, truly dreadful.
And anything that says TOM RUBYTHON on the cover.


#31 BullHead

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:18

Some good suggestions, I can tell you one thats worth avoiding imo, The Pits, by Beverley Turner, seldom has a book been so aptly named.

To me it comes across as written by a woman who entered a room full of men, and was disappointed that none took an interest in her.


I disagree that it should be avoided. It offers a different perspective and indeed is as you describe. I found that point of view and the anecdotes that fill the book quite insightful. A light hearted read.

#32 Smile17

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:44

I recently read and enjoyed 'Chequered Conflict' by Maurice Hamilton about the 2007 'McLaren Spygate' season: http://sidepodcast.c...n-kindle-review


That was the most biased book I've ever read. It's quite entertaining though, but it doesn't match with reality at all sadly.

#33 klyster

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:48

Old school F1, but "Memories of the Bear: A Biography of Denny Hulme" by Eoin Young was a good read.
"The Jack Brabham Story" was a good read too.

Edited by klyster, 21 September 2012 - 07:50.


#34 DampMongoose

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 08:54

The Last Road Race - Richard Williams
I also second a previous poster that the above authors biography of Enzo Ferrari is very good too
All Arms and Elbows - Innes Ireland is a good yarn, but try and pick up a copy that hasn't been scanned and reprinted with millions of typos (5's for S, 1's for I etc)

I also agree that Tom Rubython should be avoided, His Senna book is steaming with innaccuracies and bias, along with being a bit of a cut and paste job at times...

And that 'Winning is not eneough' for the most part is just Jackie Stewart name dropping about how well connected he is...

My favourite motorsport book but only brief regarding F1, is Vic Elfords - Reflections on a Golden Era of Motorsport!

#35 lustigson

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 10:10

I found these books very good reads, indeed:

Flat Out, Flat Broke - Perry McCarthy
Memoirs of a Racing Man - Jo Ramirez
Hitler's Motor Racing Battles - Eberhard Reuss
The Piranha Club - Timothy Collins

#36 ensign14

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 12:54

"The Lost Generation" by David Tremayne, but you'll need a hanky.

And try stepping outside F1. "American Zoom" by Peter Golenbock is an excellent run-through of NASCAR history - and has the advantage of being sufficiently long enough to last out a holiday.