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1994 Penske PC23 Indy Car


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#301 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 14:49

We have just got the floor back from MCT, the carbon shop we use. I feel I have to give them a plug as they have done a staggering job. We've had one of our guys working along side them throughout their part in this project and the close working relationship has really paid off. The following photos show some of the detail but I've been unable to truly capture just how good it looks overall. The whole upper side of the floor and rear extension have been re-skinned including the A surfaces which were moulded, new skins made and then boned on. A terrific way to end the week. 

 

 

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The heat shielding is bonded and bagged before going into the autoclave. Despite the header bags the underwing still sees a lot of heat. It got slightly easier in the late 1990's as the wastegate tailpipes moved outside the bodywork so that the exhaust flow sealed the sides of the defuser. This meant the pipes themselves moved outside the car where as on the PC 23 they are inside. 
 

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This duct feeds the Pi MRC boost controller and the data logger. There is a snorkel extension on the rad duct that takes air from under the water cooler and feeds it into this duct. The electronics boxes sit on a tray that is mounted to the chassis and seals to the floor once it's lifted up into place. Pi were very complimentary about Penske's efforts to keep the boxes cool. 
 

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A similar detail on the right hand side. This duct cools the ECU and spark unit as well as the alternator control unit. 
 

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The two ducts to right and left are fed from the NACA duct at the rear of the cars flank, just inboard of the rear wheel. The airflow on each side is split into 3 - one ducts goes to the header bag, one blows directly over the neck that separates the hot bottom can from the top can of the wastegate. The third part of the duct feeds via a flexible pipe about an inch in diameter to these two little ducts. They in turn seal to the gearbox bell housing to cool the clutch. The air then exits into the turbo area. 
 

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In this photo you can see the NACA duct mentioned above and the air manifold that splits the flow into 3. You can also see the oil catch tank. These became aluminium on later cars as the engine blowby became more excessive... as did the oil consumption. The carbon tanks had a rather nasty habit of splitting under pressure when they got full. 

Edited by Patrick Morgan, 24 January 2014 - 15:34.


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#302 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 15:38

With the dreaded bodywork done we are now starting to look at final assembly of the major mechanical bits. The 265D engine is now coming together with the bottom end complete. 

 

 

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One of the features of all the 1980's and 1990's Ilmor engines is that the gear drive to the camshafts is at the rear of the engine. The idea was that the torsional vibration that plagues this system would be less severe closer to the flywheel. I recently had cause to ask Mario Illien if this was really the case. He said it was..... very slightly....! The large machined hole just above the crankshaft is the turbo scavenge pump. Unlike the main scav's this is a dual gerotor style pump. 
 

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These are the main scavenge pumps. Each chamber has a roots pump that is effectively split into 3 with the two outside sections scavenging the chamber and the middle scavenging ether the front or rear of one of the cylinder heads. Additionally there is a small scav on its own right at the back of the pump battery that scavenges the gear chest. On the 265E pushrod engine this had to move to the front as that engine had its single cam drive at the front. The wrap-around on the front pump is the water passage that feeds the block from the pump via a passage cast into the sump. 
 

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The centre V features a web across it to tie the two banks together. The drive from the gear train passes though here to drive the alternator in the centre then the pump drive belt at the front of the engine. As an interesting aside the Ilmor Logo was designed such that it was easy to machine into any surface. I believe Zeus took it upon themselves to cast it into the block on the 265A and this tradition carried on.... 

Edited by Patrick Morgan, 27 January 2014 - 15:43.


#303 desmo

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 16:19

The thing that strikes me is the level of finish and detail.  This car appears built with care that would put some highly regarded F1 cars to shame.



#304 Greg Locock

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 22:48

Pop rivets in carbon fibre prepreg. Ack. other than that yes, it looks terrific.



#305 Magoo

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 14:36

Thanks for the great photos of the engine. Oh, what people would have given for these pictures in 1994



#306 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 16:29

Pop rivets in carbon fibre prepreg. Ack. other than that yes, it looks terrific.

 

They are not so bad. I'm not sure how you would achieve the same thing without adding weight and complexity. You can't use a solid rivet without going though to the underside of the underwing which you want to avoid if at all possible. They are only a belt and braces in case the duct comes loose - race cars vibrate quite a lot! 



#307 Greg Locock

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 21:53

Yes they are that bad. At GEC my oppo had been working on the fatigue of composite parts for a helicopter manufacturer. The a/c industry is incredibly conservative and insists on using rivets or fasteners to hold bits together just in case the glue fails (It's also a very cheap and good way of jigging them at assembly). Many of the failures he documented started where the weave of the prepreg was pierced or distorted by the holes for the fasteners.

 

Another way of looking at it. Do a strength test of two parts glued together. Do a strength test with the two parts held together with pop rivets. How can the weaker system provide backup  in the event of failure of the stronger one?



#308 gruntguru

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 00:10

Do the rivets provide a convenient method of clamping the parts while the adhesive is curing? Particularly with tricky geometries?



#309 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 00:17

Do the rivets provide a convenient method of clamping the parts while the adhesive is curing? Particularly with tricky geometries?

Yes, precisely. That's all there was to it. Otherwise you end up spending an inordinate amount of time making complex fixtures to hold these irregular shapes in place (and apply a clamping pressure) while the bond cures. Having to use rivets wasn't elegant, but it was pragmatic.


Edited by Nigel Beresford, 29 January 2014 - 00:19.


#310 Greg Locock

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:01

Do the rivets provide a convenient method of clamping the parts while the adhesive is curing? Particularly with tricky geometries?

 

 (It's also a very cheap and good way of jigging them at assembly).



#311 gruntguru

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:37

Whoops sorry missed that.



#312 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 09:11

 

 

Another way of looking at it. Do a strength test of two parts glued together. Do a strength test with the two parts held together with pop rivets. How can the weaker system provide backup  in the event of failure of the stronger one?

 

Pop rivits are undeniably a weaker system than glue overall however by virtue of their shape they tend to keep components in place, albeit loosely, in the event that the primarily method of fastening fails. In this case the weakness in the primary method of fixing is, or could be, its susceptibility to temperature during heat-soak (i.e. when the car is not moving) and any flexing of the floor say if the car is curbed. Pop rivets, although not elegant are not as susceptible to failure as glue when subjected to the sort of temperature to which they are exposed in this case. They also tolerate quite a lot of deformation before they fail themselves.

 

As Nigel has pointed out they are also a useful way of clamping two components together during assembly which I suspect is the main reason they are there. 

 

Your points are absolutely valid and I don't wish to sound over defensive but we are discussing a car designed to last 600 miles on race day produced by a small company at a time when composites were newer to the racing industry than they are today. Where ever possible solid rivets are used on Penske cars and in many cases they are found where Lola or March would have used pop rivets.



#313 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 16:41

The gearbox is now complete, we are just waiting on some tooling to check the pre-load on the diff before it goes in. Some photos and Greg, I'm sure you will be relieved to know there isn't a pop rivet in sight!

 

 

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This is the 265D version of the gearbox. The 265E version had a wider cluster to cope with the torque and had to accommodate a different bevel gear ratio as the engine rpm was so much lower. The 265E was designed to fit exactly into the PC 23 without any changes to the car, a considerable feet considering the E was a bigger capacity engine and required as narrow a V angle as possible to keep the pushrods short. But despite that most of the back end of the car ended up changing. 
 

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The gear selector on the Penske's blows me away. To get all three rods to run on such a compact barrel is a real feat of engineering. 
 


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Helpfully the nuts under the covers have the same spline as the cover itself!


#314 gruntguru

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 23:21

 

 

 
Helpfully the nuts under the covers have the same spline as the cover itself!

 

As long as you have a tool that fits the covers!



#315 Greg Locock

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 01:22

A cold chisel and a 2lb hammer....



#316 gruntguru

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 03:41

Multi-grips? Pipe wrench?



#317 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 10:25

All the above suggestions would be far cheeper than the the alternative! We made these up to do it properly....

 

 

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#318 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 13:53

A cold chisel and a 2lb hammer....

I reckon cold is right - the test team would have agreed! Almost all the 265E testing was done in the snowy tundra of Nazareth and Michigan..... The poor drivers had to come in to be warmed with heat-guns every few laps... it was all pretty extreme. 



#319 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 16:23

265D Cylinder head photos. 

 

 

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I've been busy modelling many of these parts for a friend in the USA who has written a book on the 265E (to be published in May) and it's pretty staggering just how much bigger the valves etc. are in that engine. It obviously had only 2 valves per cylinder where the 265D had 4 but still. The other real surprise when you get into the detail is just how much smaller the 265D is from the 265A parts.
 
You can see the webbing that supports the cam and provides the structure to make the engine a stiff part of the chassis. All that detail is missing in the 265E (central cam in the block) which is why the cylinder head has a stiff flat plate across it. Not fun for installing the collets!! Tony Matthews has a great photo of the 265E head I think... as in can you post that Tony! 


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#320 Fat Boy

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 17:48

I reckon cold is right - the test team would have agreed! Almost all the 265E testing was done in the snowy tundra of Nazareth and Michigan..... The poor drivers had to come in to be warmed with heat-guns every few laps... it was all pretty extreme. 

 

I knew one of the guys that ran the test team. He said it was the easiest testing he ever did. Drive to Nazareth in the morning, Run the car for a couple hours (at most). Blow it up. Take it home. Pull the engine, and replace it with the one that just came from Germany with updates. repeat. Maybe set the car up once a week.



#321 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 21:37

I knew one of the guys that ran the test team. He said it was the easiest testing he ever did. Drive to Nazareth in the morning, Run the car for a couple hours (at most). Blow it up. Take it home. Pull the engine, and replace it with the one that just came from Germany with updates. repeat. Maybe set the car up once a week.

Guy Oder? It wasn't that simple but that's what I would expect Guy to say! He's good as sweeping statements in the best possible way. Ask PT how easy it was as Nazareth..... between 10 foot high banks of snow, feet, hands and tires frozen and he still broke the lap record in freezing conditions!!!! It's all covered in the book and there is a lot that no one will have heard before. Everyone we have spoken to knows their bit but no one has heard the full story - a massive effort over 2 continents in complete secrecy.

 

I've really enjoyed every moment of the last few months on this book and I've learned so much. I knew it was a neat engine but didn't really appreciate why it was so neat, not in detail. There was a bit of a eureka moment doing 2D projections of the valve gear having struggled with the weird geometry when just for the hell of it I did a view from above and realized that I was staring straight at the inlet valve - totally uninhibited. Suddenly it all made sense, why the valves are rotated by 20 degrees around the cylinder axis... no pushrod engine I've ever seen has a dead straight inlet port, it's always compromised by the valve gear, the 265E port is dead straight. The complication to achieve that is monumental and I never got that before December this year.



#322 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 21:40

I knew one of the guys that ran the test team. He said it was the easiest testing he ever did. Drive to Nazareth in the morning, Run the car for a couple hours (at most). Blow it up. Take it home. Pull the engine, and replace it with the one that just came from Germany with updates. repeat. Maybe set the car up once a week.

Incidentally none of the engines came from Germany, they all came from the UK or were built by a small team in Reading. Mercedes had no involvement at all before April 1994 which made it quite a scrabble when they did come on board. 



#323 Magoo

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 23:40

 

 

You can see the webbing that supports the cam and provides the structure to make the engine a stiff part of the chassis. All that detail is missing in the 265E (central cam in the block) which is why the cylinder head has a stiff flat plate across it. Not fun for installing the collets!! Tony Matthews has a great photo of the 265E head I think... as in can you post that Tony! 

 

 

Please please please! 



#324 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 23:56

Would running the engine(in car) in such cold conditions teach you anything dyno running wouldn't? It seems like if you're going to be in such bizarre conditions that you will never ever encounter in competition, you might as well stay in the lab until you can do meaningful track testing. Even if it's just the testing to see what breaks. 



#325 desmo

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 00:13

Dyno testing obviously doesn't really test the whole package though and it surely can only approximate actual track duty even for the powertrain.

#326 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 01:11

That's kind of what I mean. Running in the snow is only approximating track running too. Wouldn't the stresses you put on it be somewhat misleading because the car isn't going around the track anything like it would in anger. I see the logic in running around in Spain in January and February like F1 does, but super-frigid American Midwest seems dumb.

 

I mean jesus, at least go to Phoenix and test(Fontana, Homestead etc didn't exist back then). I can understand Michigan because that was Penske owned at the time so there might have been secrecy, but I don't know that Nazareth would be?

 

Especially with the Andrettis living nearby...



#327 RogerGraham

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 02:18

Wouldn't the stresses you put on it be somewhat misleading because the car isn't going around the track anything like it would in anger.

 

Patrick noted that "he still broke the lap record in freezing conditions", so it must have been running at least a little bit hard.  

 

Not to say that running somewhere warmer might not give more scope for harder testing.



#328 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 03:34

With that engine I'm not surprised  :p



#329 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 07:57

That's kind of what I mean. Running in the snow is only approximating track running too. Wouldn't the stresses you put on it be somewhat misleading because the car isn't going around the track anything like it would in anger. I see the logic in running around in Spain in January and February like F1 does, but super-frigid American Midwest seems dumb.

 

I mean jesus, at least go to Phoenix and test(Fontana, Homestead etc didn't exist back then). I can understand Michigan because that was Penske owned at the time so there might have been secrecy, but I don't know that Nazareth would be?

 

Especially with the Andrettis living nearby...

You are going to have to wait till May but you have hit the nail on the head and the other comments above are also spot on. It was misleading but in the end that worked out for the best. 

 

It wasn't just the engine that was being tested remember - you can't just add 35% more torque and expect the rest of the car to live.....


Edited by Patrick Morgan, 11 February 2014 - 07:59.


#330 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:19

Dan Boyd has recently provided us with some reference photos of chassis 08 and other similar cars with Emerson at the wheel. I thought I would post a few of the 1994 shots. All are copywrite Dan Boyd and reproduced with permission - for which we are grateful as they are so good. 

 

 

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This is chassis 08 (the car we are restoring) during the Cleveland race. I thought Cleveland was such a great event - very different to any other track. Despite the bumps the fact the cars could run 7 wide though turn 1 made it very exciting. The 1993 race was one not forgotten in a hurry with Emerson and Mansell hard at it for 2nd in the last few laps. The downside of working there was that the pitlane was about a half mile from the paddock so if you forgot anything you had a long walk back.... I suspect Nigel was probably senior (in rank) enough to be able to commandeer a moped though... 
 

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Any photo where the car is visibly hovering above the ground looks great. I guess the monobump system is doing it's thing in his shot. 
 

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Note the NACA duct in the sidepod across from the number 2.... it's not present in the early season shots or in Tony Matthews shots of the first build which leads us to -
 

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Late season 265D with plenum spacer and added cooling for the headers. We have not got the extra ducting fitted because I foolishly assumed it was a Bettenhausen mod to cope with the increased power of the following years engine. It seems now that it was not. I guess I need to figure out now whether to build it in or not before we paint the side pods.... I suspect we will end up leaving it as it is without. 

Edited by Patrick Morgan, 11 February 2014 - 12:22.


#331 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 14:01

That's kind of what I mean. Running in the snow is only approximating track running too. Wouldn't the stresses you put on it be somewhat misleading because the car isn't going around the track anything like it would in anger. I see the logic in running around in Spain in January and February like F1 does, but super-frigid American Midwest seems dumb.

 

I mean jesus, at least go to Phoenix and test(Fontana, Homestead etc didn't exist back then). I can understand Michigan because that was Penske owned at the time so there might have been secrecy, but I don't know that Nazareth would be?

 

Especially with the Andrettis living nearby...

Tracy was running it hard, not messing about. Nice high lateral Gs at Nazareth that you don't get on the dyno, for testing the oil system, and don't forget we were also putting miles on a substantially different gearbox too - something for which there was no rig. Also, it was an hour's drive from the shop, not two and a half days in a truck (plus a day lost each way in crew flights) such as Phx would have been, so not so dumb. In addition, Nazareth was absolutely locked down... there's no way we could have kept it secret if we ran at a non-Penske track.The engine shop also had call on the in-house dynos at Reading, to run up to eight freshly built D engines for the three-car team for every race weekend, and if Karl didn't like what he saw for one of them on the dyno then it would come apart again, so there wasn't necessarily availability. In any case, much of the early running of the E on the dyno was done overnight, with only a very select few people aware of its existence. The engine shop guys would come in in the morning and wonder how come the dyno was warm.. 


Edited by Nigel Beresford, 11 February 2014 - 14:07.


#332 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 15:00

Ah okay, I forgot Nazareth was Penske-owned at one point. Most(?) Penske tracks were bought by NASCAR eventually but since Nazareth decayed into a building site I figured someone else owned it. 

 

In terms of the loading, I guess I was thinking more of heat. Not just engine temps but the car running in the environment it was designed for and creating the actual conditions it would race in; and that winter conditions would be as far away from that as the dyno because you'd be designing for a relatively narrow window of operation.

 

That said you were there  :p And the reverse-load of testing what it did to the car also makes obvious sense. You wouldn't want to learn in April that the car had so much torque the car was tipping over...



#333 Fat Boy

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 18:36

Guy Oder? It wasn't that simple but that's what I would expect Guy to say!

 

That's the Guy I was talking about...and ya, he said it was always cold.

 

You're right, the engines were from the UK & Ilmor, not Germany...my bad.

 

As far as track suitability, They used Nazareth because it was close, snow and all. That's why they owned snow plows and track blowers. They didn't need a carbon copy of Indy, they just needed run time. That's what they got. When you figure that sometimes the engine would only last 30 minutes, the commute to Phoenix gets a little rough.

 

The engine sounded different than a normal one, but not _so_ different that even if Michael and Mario were on the fence watching it go around, they really wouldn't have known  what they were watching. The pushrod motor was such a sucker-punch than no one really even ever considered it a plausable option.



#334 Fat Boy

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 18:39

 if Karl didn't like what he saw for one of them on the dyno then it would come apart again, so there wasn't necessarily availability.

 

Didn't they only bring Karl in on it until very late in the process? Only ~1/3-1/2 of the team even knew about engine, correct?



#335 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 19:18

Didn't they only bring Karl in on it until very late in the process? Only ~1/3-1/2 of the team even knew about engine, correct?

Karl was in from the beginning but was one of the few from Reading that was. Several happy coincidences happened at the same time to keep the pushrod team separate but at a high level of competence. Karl was present at the first cam rig test in Brixworth so involved even before the motor ran for the first time. His part in the whole project is pretty unbelievable. I always respected him greatly. Some of the stuff that's come out has only fortified that 10 fold. 

 

Your above post is absolutely spot on ref Nazareth. Jade (the author of this forthcoming book I mentioned) got a great interview with Mario Andretti about it and whether he heard it or not. 



#336 Regazzoni

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 19:47

Is it possible to have some more details about the forthcoming book - title, etc - or is it still too early?


Edited by Regazzoni, 11 February 2014 - 19:48.


#337 Fat Boy

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 19:47

Karl was in from the beginning but was one of the few from Reading that was.

 

OK, it was the other engine shop manager (second in command, I guess) that wasn't in on it until very late. Strikes me as a way to stir up a lot of intra-team animosity.



#338 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 20:18

I can't imagine who that could have been. There wasn't a second in command. Karl Kainhofer was the General Manager of Penske Racing at the time, and as such was nominally in charge of the whole place, but in reality he made sure the facilities were looked after and spent his time running the engine shop. Under that umbrella (and while Karl made sure the D engines were handled) Kevin Walter had day to day responsibility for the E engine project, together with Mark McArdle and Ilmor's Dave Warner. So there was a clear allocation of resources, personnel and responsibilities. There certainly weren't any egos bent out of shape at any point. The whole team was full of talented, fantastic people throughout, and certainly there was no cause for anyone to feel slighted. The circle of knowledge about the project rippled outwards on a classic "need to know" basis, but there was no "I know something you don't" silliness - that's not Penske Racing's style.

Edited by Nigel Beresford, 11 February 2014 - 20:20.


#339 Magoo

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 20:35

 

Dan Boyd has recently provided us with some reference photos of chassis 08 and other similar cars with Emerson at the wheel. I thought I would post a few of the 1994 shots. All are copywrite Dan Boyd and reproduced with permission - for which we are grateful as they are so good. 

 

 

 

How is Dan? Haven't seen him in a few years. Great guy. Hard working guy.  



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#340 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 21:27

How is Dan? Haven't seen him in a few years. Great guy. Hard working guy.  

I've only recently been put in contact with Dan but I have to say he has been extremely helpful and very quick at going though his archives. I suspect I have met him at some point - I always really respected the photographers as they really made the cars look as good as they did in real life. My Dad used to carry the film back from races for Autosport several times a year, I guess that gave me some sort of perceived link to them!



#341 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 21:54

Is it possible to have some more details about the forthcoming book - title, etc - or is it still too early?

The title has pretty much just been decided on in the last day or two - it's a month or two away from being announced though. It's about the E engine but also covers the events of the time i.e. the CART IRL split in some detail and sets out the timeline which going back in this thread will change some misconceptions, my own included. There is nothing like proper in depth research to bring forward your own lack of understanding. That stuff was really quite an eye opener as a fan. I've had to re-evaluate my view on USAC somewhat, the real story of the relationship between Penske, the speedway and USAC is very different to what the world saw on the outside. 

 

It's not a technical book, more a novel, but inevitably as it's about a technical subject it does flesh some things out and lay to rest some of the conjecture. Jade and I both went to some (as in as far as we could realistically go) lengths to get it technical accurate. We weighed the D and E engines, measured C of G and I've modelled the valve gear (of both D and E), gear train, crank, parts of the block and cylinder head as well as the PC 23 gearbox to produce illustrations - the models are right, you could make parts from them (with the possible exception of the gear tooth forms which I had to make a stab at). I learned some unexpected things like the E engines heat rejection was actually lower than the D despite producing substantially more power. I always thought the engine coolers had to be bigger - turns out they were not. 

 

Anyway I can't give too much away! I really hope it's enjoyed by all…. well most. I can't see Tony George being thrilled but I hope it gives some insight as to his motivations and why he made the choices he did. 


Edited by Patrick Morgan, 11 February 2014 - 22:14.


#342 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 21:56

How is Dan? Haven't seen him in a few years. Great guy. Hard working guy.  

 

The LAT USA gang always had great photos. When I filtered the photos for this website you were spoiled for choice from any US race weekend. I personally thought they were better than what we got from the F1 crew.



#343 Regazzoni

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 22:02

Thank you, Patrick, look forward to reading it.



#344 Fat Boy

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 04:59

I think I came across wrong.

 

I wasn't saying that there _was_ animosity between the 'knows' and 'didn't knows'. I was just opining that it _could_ go that direction.

 

As far as any particular guy in the engine department, I don't even know where I heard that one of the higher up guys didn't know. There was a lot of stories floating around. I probably mixed some of them up. I certainly wasn't there, so take anything I write with a grain of salt.



#345 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 10:02

I think it was a fair assumption and a good thing to bring up, but Penske was pretty devoid of petty jealousies and the politics they create because of the very clearly defined authority structure. Everyone knew who was in charge - his name was right there over the door.

#346 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 14:20

The 265D is coming together very fast now. By tonight the pumps will be fitted and hopefully the cams will be timed.... 

 

 

12479582045_926b76ef24_b.jpg
 


#347 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 17:02

With the book "Beast" now announced I can publish one of the illustrations as a flavour of what's in there. I got a bit carried away with the detail....

 

 

12522818053_0aa6acd6c9_b.jpg


#348 Regazzoni

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 17:16

Details are never enough... Looks very promising. :up:



#349 Patrick Morgan

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 16:58

Some more detail for you then! 

 

12543163343_1eddbabc13_b.jpg
 
This is the valve gear of the 265E. The valves are rotated about the cylinder axis such that the inlet port can run between the pushrods. It makes the geometry ferociously complex though. At some point I'll post a view looking down from above to make this more clear. Note all the needle rollers. The engine builders claim to have had nightmares about being chained to their workbenches putting these in for months after. They are double row (i.e. two needles across the component) so that any crowning in the needle doesn't cause the follower to rock - it's supported at two points across it's pivot axis…. hope that makes sense! There are an unholy number of needles in the engine the exact number is stated in the book but it's several thousand. All loaded by hand…..

Edited by Patrick Morgan, 15 February 2014 - 17:27.


#350 Regazzoni

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 18:42

Patrick, if the book is about just one racing engine with this kind of detail, you have already sold my copy! Cheers, Lucio