Jump to content


Photo

99.93%


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 26 November 2012 - 21:39

If Kimi Raikkonen had not gone the wrong way up a one way street in Brazil yesterday, he probably wouldn't have been lapped. But he did and he was.

What a pity - it meant that rather than complete 100% of the total number of kilometers run in this 20 race season, he completed 99.93%. This was the only lap he lost in the whole season. Not bad, is it.

In 2008 Nick Heidfeld also finished in all the races but he was a total of 5 laps adrift of 100%.

I wonder if anyone else has a 100% finishing record in one season.

Advertisement

#2 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 26 November 2012 - 22:10

Not F1, but Alberto Ascari finished every world championship F2 race he started in 1952

And won them all

#3 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
  • Member

  • 2,151 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 26 November 2012 - 22:22

Not one season, but this reminds me of Ted Horn's finishing record in nine consecutive Indy 500s: if not for a red flag one year, when the race finished in rain, he would (could?) have completed all 1,800 laps, or 4,500 miles, or 7,242 kilometers. Instead, he completed 99.94 %!

#4 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
  • Member

  • 2,151 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 26 November 2012 - 22:23

Not one season, but this reminds me of Ted Horn's finishing record in nine consecutive Indy 500s: if not for a red flag one year, when the race finished in rain, he would (could?) have completed all 1,800 laps, or 4,500 miles, or 7,242 kilometers. Instead, he completed 99.94 %!

#5 E.B.

E.B.
  • Member

  • 1,635 posts
  • Joined: March 05

Posted 26 November 2012 - 22:57

I wonder if anyone else has a 100% finishing record in one season.


The beloved Michael Schumacher podiumed (sorry) in every race in 2002, not sure if he was lapped in any of the few he didn't win?


#6 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 27 November 2012 - 08:05

No, he wasn't. That trumps Kimi. But I cite the superiority of the 2002 Ferrari to make Raikkonen's achievement all the more worthy as the Lotus was hardly on a par with R.B. and Mac or indeed, Ferrari, at most races.


#7 Eric Dunsdon

Eric Dunsdon
  • Member

  • 625 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 27 November 2012 - 09:02

If Kimi Raikkonen had not gone the wrong way up a one way street in Brazil yesterday, he probably wouldn't have been lapped. But he did and he was.

What a pity - it meant that rather than complete 100% of the total number of kilometers run in this 20 race season, he completed 99.93%. This was the only lap he lost in the whole season. Not bad, is it.

In 2008 Nick Heidfeld also finished in all the races but he was a total of 5 laps adrift of 100%.

I wonder if anyone else has a 100% finishing record in one season.

Crikes!. Nostalgia for two days ago!. :confused:

#8 Allan Lupton

Allan Lupton
  • Member

  • 3,022 posts
  • Joined: March 06

Posted 27 November 2012 - 09:13

Crikes!. Nostalgia for two days ago!. :confused:

Truly nostalgia isn't what it was. :p

#9 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 11,661 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:12

Crikes!. Nostalgia for two days ago!. :confused:



Truly nostalgia isn't what it was. :p


Surely Nostalgia is exactly what it was only sooner!


#10 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:13

Well, nostalgia never was what it was but my reference to two days ago then refers back a number of years.

The Nostalgia Forum doesn't restrict itself to the eras of Nuvolari, Fangio, Clark and Stewart. Or at least, I hope it doesn't.

There are still old anoraks who actually enjoy modern Formula 1 racing.

#11 john winfield

john winfield
  • Member

  • 1,033 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:32

Barry and EB pointing out the reliability of the competitive Raikkonen/Lotus and Schumacher/Ferrari pairings reminded me how different things were, and not so long ago. Drifting slightly OT, in the 1970s at least three seasons featured wins by drivers who otherwise failed to score a single point in those individual years, in part because of their cars' dreadful reliability - anyone remember?
I know Baghetti scored just nine points in 1961 (from only three starts) and, in obviously different and sad circumstances, so did Jim Clark in 1968. Perhaps there are more. In 2012 Maldonado could be considered the most unlikely winner, but even he had several other finishes, some in the points. I don't know about nostalgia but unreliability certainly aint what it used to be.

Edited by john winfield, 27 November 2012 - 10:34.


#12 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:35

Oddly enough, that's one of the things I'm not so keen on these days.

I loved seeing someone start 15th and get in the points without necessarily overtaking anyone.


#13 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,216 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:46

I know Baghetti scored just nine points in 1961 (from only three starts) and, in obviously different and sad circumstances, so did Jim Clark in 1968. Perhaps there are more.

Jean-Pierre Jabouille springs to mind here. In an F1 career of 49 GP starts he scored points just three times - a 4th in 1978, a win in 1979 and a win in 1980. Peter Gethin also - a 6th a 1st and a 6th, all in different years.

Edited by Tim Murray, 27 November 2012 - 10:50.


#14 king_crud

king_crud
  • Member

  • 1,412 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:47

Oddly enough, that's one of the things I'm not so keen on these days.

I loved seeing someone start 15th and get in the points without necessarily overtaking anyone.


Agreed.

Or the excitment of a fast but unreliable car, would it finish?

#15 john winfield

john winfield
  • Member

  • 1,033 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:52

Oddly enough, that's one of the things I'm not so keen on these days.

I loved seeing someone start 15th and get in the points without necessarily overtaking anyone.


Completely agree. The impressive engineering reliability removes some of the fun. I wonder how the technical regs could be tweaked to include a little more (safe) unreliability. Electronically activated oil leaks perhaps? I miss that haze of tell-tale blue smoke which provided several laps of...'is that oil leaking from Ickx's Ferrari?'.....'must be, look, the nose of Stewart's Tyrrell is turning black'...'it's OK, the smoke has stopped'....bang!

Edited by john winfield, 27 November 2012 - 12:27.


#16 king_crud

king_crud
  • Member

  • 1,412 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:56

I read that the new turbo regs will have a rev limit of 15k, but the engines can only realistically operate around 12k, so there may be potential for a few bangs

#17 john winfield

john winfield
  • Member

  • 1,033 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:02

Jean-Pierre Jabouille springs to mind here. In an F1 career of 49 GP starts he scored points just three times - a 4th in 1978, a win in 1979 and a win in 1980. Peter Gethin also - a 6th a 1st and a 6th, all in different years.


You're right Tim, Jabouille and Gethin were two of the three I had in mind. I would guess that JPJ's finishing record, for a 'front runner', must be one of the very worst, but not unexpected given the test-bed nature of Renault's turbo project 1977-1980. I had forgotten that he had two seasons with a win and nothing else.


#18 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,216 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:20

Who's the third, John? I'm thinking possibly Scarfiotti in 1966 (one win from two starts).

#19 john winfield

john winfield
  • Member

  • 1,033 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:22

Who's the third, John? I'm thinking possibly Scarfiotti in 1966 (one win from two starts).


Beltoise I think, Tim, in 1972. The Monaco win and nothing else.

Edited by john winfield, 27 November 2012 - 11:23.


Advertisement

#20 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,216 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:32

Ah yes of course - how could I forget that one. :blush:

#21 Glengavel

Glengavel
  • Member

  • 504 posts
  • Joined: September 06

Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:48

Not F1, but Alberto Ascari finished every world championship F2 race he started in 1952

And won them all


Woolf Barnato - three attempts at 24 Hours of Le Mans, three wins.


#22 byrkus

byrkus
  • Member

  • 787 posts
  • Joined: October 01

Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:14

Fisichella was close in 2003 - win in Brazil, and then an 8th in USA...


#23 airbox

airbox
  • New Member

  • 1 posts
  • Joined: April 12

Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:47

Hi everyone

First post here, so hope this is correct..

As I remember in 1985 Teo Fabi had one pole position (in Germany) but no points, no fastest laps and I'm not sure he even finished a race that year.

Alboreto in 1983 had a win at Detroit, and one sixth place later in the season

#24 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,883 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 27 November 2012 - 13:00

There are still old anoraks who actually enjoy modern Formula 1 racing.


:up:

#25 Eric Dunsdon

Eric Dunsdon
  • Member

  • 625 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 27 November 2012 - 13:19

There are still old anoraks who actually enjoy modern Formula 1 racing.

Mine was strictly a tongue in cheek comment Barry and I admire your interest in modern Formula 1. I still watch it too, though I dont actually enjoy it very often!. I dont relate to the cars, circuits or some of the countries that stage races these days, but having been bitten by the motor racing bug in 1950 I find it hard to switch off, and as long as Ferrari and drivers like Alonso are involved and there is still an Italian Grand Prix at Monza there seems to be little chance of that changing, :cool:

#26 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 27 November 2012 - 13:35

Glad to here it, Eric.

But surely you must have found a large number of this season's races enthralling?

#27 Eric Dunsdon

Eric Dunsdon
  • Member

  • 625 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 27 November 2012 - 17:00

Glad to here it, Eric.

But surely you must have found a large number of this season's races enthralling?

The strange thing is Barry, that while I can still remember individual races from the 1950's, todays events all seem to blend into one. Maybe because there are just so many of them!. I cant honestly say that I have been enthralled exactly, though I must say that Fernando Alonso's driving in the last few races has been both impressive and heart warming. That 1956 Italian Grand Prix was a belter though wasnt it?!.

#28 DogEarred

DogEarred
  • Member

  • 438 posts
  • Joined: June 10

Posted 27 November 2012 - 18:07

The strange thing is Barry, that while I can still remember individual races from the 1950's, todays events all seem to blend into one. Maybe because there are just so many of them!. I cant honestly say that I have been enthralled exactly, though I must say that Fernando Alonso's driving in the last few races has been both impressive and heart warming. That 1956 Italian Grand Prix was a belter though wasnt it?!.


I have an idea to help out F1 fans & reduce costs at the same time.

Why not run all 20 races consecutively, at the same venue & get it all over at once, instead of waiting around for 8 months to get the result.

We could run this event somewhere convenient - central France - in the month of June for example, over a whole day & night & allow driver changes to keep things going.

What could we call it & what circuit could we use?....

#29 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 27 November 2012 - 18:10

Nah. It'll never catch on.

#30 nicanary

nicanary
  • Member

  • 444 posts
  • Joined: February 12

Posted 27 November 2012 - 18:15

The strange thing is Barry, that while I can still remember individual races from the 1950's, todays events all seem to blend into one. Maybe because there are just so many of them!. I cant honestly say that I have been enthralled exactly, though I must say that Fernando Alonso's driving in the last few races has been both impressive and heart warming. That 1956 Italian Grand Prix was a belter though wasnt it?!.


You and I are kindred spirits. I can't stop watching because I would feel that I was letting the side down, but I often fall asleep. I agree that the uniformity, nay generic , form of the racing today means nothing seems to stand out during a season. Having said that, I admire some of the present top drivers, and acknowledge the brilliant engineering that goes into the cars.

Because we are nostalgists, is this a form of selective memory?


#31 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 936 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 27 November 2012 - 20:35

If Kimi Raikkonen had not gone the wrong way up a one way street in Brazil yesterday, he probably wouldn't have been lapped. But he did and he was.

I guess it wasn't just a one way street, but part of the old Interlagos track too!

Just take a look at Google maps: http://maps.google.c...e...mp;t=k&z=15

#32 LittleChris

LittleChris
  • Member

  • 2,159 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 27 November 2012 - 21:26

Juncao ie the point at which the inner circuit joined the perimeter circuit but fell into disuse ( for the F1 cars at least ) after the GP returned to Interlagos in 1990. Can see why given the proximity of the wall and the road immediately behind it.

#33 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 27 November 2012 - 21:27

Shades of the original Tamburello.


#34 Repco22

Repco22
  • Member

  • 707 posts
  • Joined: February 11

Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:28

You and I are kindred spirits. I can't stop watching because I would feel that I was letting the side down, but I often fall asleep. I agree that the uniformity, nay generic , form of the racing today means nothing seems to stand out during a season. Having said that, I admire some of the present top drivers, and acknowledge the brilliant engineering that goes into the cars.

Because we are nostalgists, is this a form of selective memory?

There's no doubt Bernie has created an international phenomenon. A certain amount of snoring can also be heard in Western Australia in the wee small hours... :lol:

#35 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 28 November 2012 - 06:45

A certain amount of snoring can be heard EVERYWHERE in the wee small hours. But what has that got to do with F.1.  ;)

#36 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,216 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:32

I know this doesn't fit Barry's criteria from his opening post as this run took place over two part-seasons, but, coming from an era in which cars were not as reliable as today's, I think it deserves honourable mention. Carlos Reutemann's Williams career got off to a poor start, with three mechanical failures in his first four races. However, he then went on to complete every lap of every race in the next 15 World Championship GPs, from Belgium 1980 to Belgium 1981. This was equivalent to a full season's races at that time.

#37 Henri Greuter

Henri Greuter
  • Member

  • 4,763 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:23

If Kimi Raikkonen had not gone the wrong way up a one way street in Brazil yesterday, he probably wouldn't have been lapped. But he did and he was.

What a pity - it meant that rather than complete 100% of the total number of kilometers run in this 20 race season, he completed 99.93%. This was the only lap he lost in the whole season. Not bad, is it.

In 2008 Nick Heidfeld also finished in all the races but he was a total of 5 laps adrift of 100%.

I wonder if anyone else has a 100% finishing record in one season.




Michael Schumacher in 2002: Even made it on the podium in every race: One 3rd place, all other scores were first or second. Granted, that wasn't a 20 season race. But from memory, when adding the last races of 2001 and the first of 2003 to that 2002 record he had a string of 22 or so with 100% laps driven.


Henri

#38 arttidesco

arttidesco
  • Member

  • 5,631 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:31

Hi everyone

First post here, so hope this is correct..

As I remember in 1985 Teo Fabi had one pole position (in Germany) but no points, no fastest laps and I'm not sure he even finished a race that year.


14th in France and 12th in Italy :up:

#39 Simon Arron

Simon Arron
  • Member

  • 2,259 posts
  • Joined: November 06

Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:10

If you factor in the distance Kimi completed in the Porsche Challenge paddock, it probably almost equates to the 0.07 per cent of the season he missed. Had the gate at the top been open, as it was when he explored the same route in a Sauber back in 2001, he might even have escaped being lapped.

Afterwards, he said he'd make sure the gate was open in 2013, just in case.

I think he definitely covered more ground in a support paddock than any other F1 driver this season.

Edited by Simon Arron, 28 November 2012 - 10:10.


Advertisement

#40 king_crud

king_crud
  • Member

  • 1,412 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:11

On the spirit of nostalgia, i truly believe that your brain runs out of space somewhere around age 30, hence all the races when we're young are so well remembered, where as it takes a lot to remember races these days.

#41 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 11,661 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:23

Another way to look at this is Average points per event.

Fangio stands at 5.44 with Fagioli on 4.57 and Alberto Ascari on 4.34.

Jim Clark is on 3.81, JYS on 3.64 and Moss on 2.83

Not sure how the modern pilotes compare.

:wave:

#42 uechtel

uechtel
  • Member

  • 1,513 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:46

I think such would not lead anywhere. The point system is different now and also it would punish Fittipaldi for having survived his years with Lotus

Edited by uechtel, 28 November 2012 - 13:51.


#43 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:18

Another way to look at this is Average points per event.

Fangio stands at 5.44 with Fagioli on 4.57 and Alberto Ascari on 4.34.

All raced in F1 before 1950, which skews the figures in their favour


#44 Roger Clark

Roger Clark
  • Member

  • 6,003 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:15

All raced in F1 before 1950, which skews the figures in their favour

Fangio competed in (I think) six F1 events in 1949 and won four of them, so the skewing may not be great.


#45 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,825 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:17

Homer Simpson Syndrome.

#46 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,136 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 28 November 2012 - 17:53

You and I are kindred spirits. I can't stop watching because I would feel that I was letting the side down, but I often fall asleep. I agree that the uniformity, nay generic , form of the racing today means nothing seems to stand out during a season. Having said that, I admire some of the present top drivers, and acknowledge the brilliant engineering that goes into the cars.

Because we are nostalgists, is this a form of selective memory?


I'm another one whose enthusiasm for what F1 has become is somewhat muted, I also watch all the races, though my practice is to record all of them to DVD. I start watching the daytime ones about half an hour after the whole thing starts, then fast forward through most of the drivel and witter that fills the first hour. Then, if something exciting happens in the race, I can rewind and watch again, and after I've enjoyed something exceptional like Kimi's pass on Jenson during the recent US race, two of the very best drivers right at the very top of their game, I just continue to watch from where I left off, so my viewing ends some minutes later than those watching the whole thing live. Seeing everything as it happens doesn't bother me at all, for the unsocial hours races, I check the results on Autosport's site as soon as I can, I'm only interested in watching racing, sometimes good and sadly all too often not, so knowing the result before I sit down to watch, doesn't bother me in the slightest. To get back to the original subject of this thread, I've been hugely impressed by Kimi Räikkönnen's performances throughout 2012, surely one of the best comebacks ever, he was one of my favourites during the first part of his on-off career, and I've loved everything he's done this year, especially the comments from the cockpit. How I wish that some of the undisciplined midfield rabble would learn a thing or two from his example.

As I usually partake of a glass or two of vino during weekend lunchtimes, sometimes even a G & T beforehand, so I occasionally suffer from nicanary's problem and drop off for short periods during races, but recording the whole thing while at the same time watching it with a slight delay, means that this is no problem at all, and I don't miss a thing, "Cheers!"