Jump to content


Photo
* * * * - 1 votes

How to get into F1: the value of winning feeder series


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 mnmracer

mnmracer
  • Member

  • 1,972 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 30 December 2012 - 16:38

As the last few seats for the 2013 Formula One season fill up, we can welcome at least three new young talents next year: GP2 driver for Marussia Max Chilton, 2011 GP3 champion and Williams test driver Valtteri Bottas and Lotus GP2 driver Esteban Gutiérrez. I thought it'd be interesting to have a look at the importance of winning a championship in a direct feeder series. What has been the best junior formula-results of today's big names in Formula One, and what became of the champions of Formula 2, Formula 3000, GP2 and Formula Renault 3.5?

Short history of the feeder series
While Formula One is the pinnacle of open-wheeled auto racing, the high-performance nature of the cars and the expense involved in the series has always meant a need for a path to reach this peak. While there are and have been many types of junior formulae, Formula 3 being the most popular, for much of the history of Formula One, Formula Two has represented the penultimate step on the motorsport ladder. In 1984, Formula Two (with their 2-liter engines) were upgraded to 3000cc engines, and the series was renamed to Formula 3000. In 2005, the new GP2 series replaced Formula 3000.

In 2005, Formula Renault ran a new, faster series from their trade-mark Formula Renault 2.0 championship. The new Formula Renault 3.5 series was almost on the same level as the GP2 series and FR3.5's first champion, Robert Kubica, became a Grand Prix winner. The World Series by Renault, as of 2012, are now actualy as fast as the GP2 series, and can really be considered one of the direct feeder series.

Formula 2, while the original series evolved into GP2, returned under that name in 2009 and is slightly slower than Formula Renault 3.5 and GP2, but still a clear step up from all the other junior formulae. Despite a relatively large field of contenders, the organisation announced that 2012 was the final season of the Formula 2 championship, due to declining entrants for 2013.

Formula One drivers in the 'feeder series'
  • Michael Schumacher (F1 debut in 1991) won the 1990 German Formula Three championship and won three races in the World Sportscar Championship.
  • Jenson Button (F1 debut in 2000) finished 3rd in the 1999 British F3 championship.
  • Fernando Alonso (F1 debut in 2001) finished 4th in the 2000 Formula 3000 championship, after winning Formula Nissan (class between F3 and F3000) in 1999.
  • Kimi Räikkönen (F1 debut in 2001) got his chance in F1 after impressing in the 2000 British Formula Renault 2000 championship.
  • Felipe Massa (F1 debut in 2001) won the 2001 European Formula 3000 championship.
  • Mark Webber (F1 debut in 2002) finished 3rd and 2nd in the 2000 and 2001 Formula 3000 championships.
  • Nico Rosberg (F1 debut in 2006) was the first driver to win the GP2 championship in 2005.
  • Sebastian Vettel (F1 debut in 2007) dominated Formula BMW and was promoted to F1 while leading the 2007 Formula Renault 3.5 championship.
  • Lewis Hamilton (F1 debut in 2007) convinvingly won the 2006 GP2 championship.
  • Romain Grosjean (F1 debut in 2009) debuted in F1 while being 2nd in the 2009 GP2 championship, won the 2011 GP2 championship.
  • Kamui Kobayashi (F1 debut in 2009) won the 2008-09 GP2 Asia championship.
  • Nico Hülkenberg (F1 debut in 2010) won the 2009 GP2 championship.
  • Bruno Senna (F1 debut in 2010) runner-up in the 2008 GP2 championship.
  • Sergio Pérez (F1 debut in 2011) finished 2nd in the 2010 GP2 championship.
  • Paul di Resta (F1 debut in 2011) won the 2006 Euroseries Formula 3 series and the 2010 Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters championship.
  • Pastor Maldonado (F1 debut in 2011) won the 2010 GP2 championship.
Formula One drivers of old in the 'feeder series'
  • Jim Clark (F1 debut in 1960) was offered a F1 drive after some impressive drives at Le Mans and in Formula Junior.
  • Jochen Rindt (F1 debut in 1964) was very succesfull in Formula 2.
  • Jackie Stewart (F1 debut in 1965) won the 1963 British Formula 3 championship and finished 2nd in the 1964 Formula 2 season.
  • Gilles Villeneuve (F1 debut in 1977) impressed James Hunt after beating several Grand Prix stars in a Formula Atlantic race in 1976.
  • Nelson Piquet (F1 debut in 1978) dominated the 1977 British Formula 3 championship.
  • Alain Prost (F1 debut in 1980) won the 1979 French and European Formula 3 championships.
  • Ayrton Senna (F1 debut in 1984) won the 1983 British Formula 3 championship.
What became of feeder series' champions
Formula 2
  • 1967 European Formula 2 champion Jacky Ickx debuted in Formula One in 1967 and went on to win 8 Grand Prix'.
  • 1968 European Formula 2 champion Jean-Pierre Beltoise debuted in Formula One in 1966 and went on to win 1 Grand Prix.
  • 1969 European Formula 2 champion Johnny Servoz-Gavin debuted in Formula One in 1967 and finished second in 1 Grand Prix.
  • 1970 European Formula 2 champion Clay Regazzoni debuted in Formula One in 1970 and went on to win 5 Grand Prix', finishing 2nd in the championship in 1974.
  • 1971 European Formula 2 champion Ronnie Peterson debuted in Formula One in 1970 and went on to win 10 Grand Prix', finishing 2nd in the championship in 1978.
  • 1972 European Formula 2 champion Mike Hailwood debuted in Formula One in 1967 and finished second in 1 Grand Prix'.
  • 1973 European Formula 2 champion Jean-Pierre Jarier debuted in Formula One in 1971 and finished three times on the podium in F1.
  • 1974 European Formula 2 champion Jacques Laffite debuted in Formula One in 1974 and went on to win 6 Grand Prix'.
  • 1975 European Formula 2 champion Patrick Depailler debuted in Formula One in 1972 and went on to win 6 Grand Prix'.
  • 1976 European Formula 2 champion Jean-Pierre Jabouille debuted in Formula One in 1974 and went on to win 2 Grand Prix'.
  • 1977 European Formula 2 champion René Arnoux debuted in Formula One in 1978 and went on to win 7 Grand Prix'.
  • 1978 European Formula 2 champion Bruno Giacomelli debuted in Formula One in 1977 and went on to finish once on the podium in F1.
  • 1979 European Formula 2 champion Marc Surer debuted in Formula One in 1979 and went on to score a best 4th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1980 European Formula 2 champion Brian Henton debuted in Formula One in 1975 but never scored any points.
  • 1981 European Formula 2 champion Geoff Lees debuted in Formula One in 1978 but never scored any points.
  • 1982 European Formula 2 champion Corrado Fabi debuted in Formula One in 1983 but never scored any points.
  • 1983 European Formula 2 champion Jonathan Palmer debuted in Formula One in 1983 and went on to score a best 4th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1984 European Formula 2 champion Mike Thackwell debuted in Formula One in 1980 but drove only 5 Grand Prix'.
International Formula 3000
  • 1985 International Formula 3000 champion Christian Danner debuted in Formula One in 1985 and went on to score a best 4th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1986 International Formula 3000 champion Ivan Capelli debuted in Formula One in 1985 and went on to score 3 podiums in F1.
  • 1987 International Formula 3000 champion Stefano Modena debuted in Formula One in 1987 and went on to score 2 podiums in F1.
  • 1988 International Formula 3000 champion Roberto Moreno debuted in Formula One in 1982 and went on to score 1 podium in F1.
  • 1989 International Formula 3000 champion Jean Alesi debuted in Formula One in 1989 and went on to win 1 Grand Prix.
  • 1990 International Formula 3000 champion Érik Comas debuted in Formula One in 1991 and went on to score a best 5th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1991 International Formula 3000 champion Christian Fittipaldi debuted in Formula One in 1992 and went on to score a best 4th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1992 International Formula 3000 champion Luca Badoer debuted in Formula One in 1993 and went on to went on to become a faillure test driver for Ferrari in Formula One.
  • 1993 International Formula 3000 champion Olivier Panis debuted in Formula One in 1994 and went on to win 1 Grand Prix.
  • 1994 International Formula 3000 champion Jean-Christophe Boullion debuted in Formula One in 1995 and went on to score a best 5th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1995 International Formula 3000 champion Vincenzo Sospiri debuted in Formula One in 1997 for one race in the failed Lola F1 team, after which he scored 2 podiums in Indycar/CART.
  • 1996 International Formula 3000 champion Jörg Müller never debuted in Formula One, although he did become test driver for Williams and had some succes in AMLS and WTCC.
  • 1997 International Formula 3000 champion Ricardo Zonta debuted in Formula One in 1999 and went on to score a best 6th place finish in Formula One.
  • 1998 International Formula 3000 champion Juan Pablo Montoya debuted in Formula One in 2001 and went on to win 7 Grand Prix'.
  • 1999 International Formula 3000 champion Nick Heidfeld debuted in Formula One in 2000 and went on to score 13 podiums in F1.
  • 2000 International Formula 3000 champion Bruno Junqueira never debuted in Formula One after losing a Williams seat to Jenson Button, but finished runner up 3 times in the CART series.
  • 2001 International Formula 3000 champion Justin Wilson debuted in Formula One in 2003 and went on to score a best 6th place finish in Formula One.
  • 2002 International Formula 3000 champion Sébastien Bourdais debuted in Formula One in 2008 and went on to score a best 7th place finish in Formula One.
  • 2003 International Formula 3000 champion Björn Wirdheim never debuted in Formula One but drove two seasons as a test driver for Jordan and Jaguar.
  • 2004 International Formula 3000 champion Vitantonio Liuzzi debuted in Formula One in 2005 and went on to score a best 6th place finish in Formula One.
GP2 series
  • 2005 GP2 series' champion Nico Rosberg debuted in Formula One in 2006 and went on to win 1 Grand Prix.
  • 2006 GP2 series' champion Lewis Hamilton debuted in Formula One in 2007 and went on to win the 2008 Formula One championship.
  • 2007 GP2 series' champion Timo Glock debuted in Formula One in 2004 and went on to score 3 podiums in F1.
  • 2008 GP2 series' champion Giorgio Pantano raced in Formula One before in 2004, but has not been very succesful in America since his GP2 win.
  • 2009 GP2 series' champion Nico Hülkenberg debuted in Formula One in 2010 and went on to score a best 4th place finish in Formula One.
  • 2010 GP2 series' champion Pastor Maldonado debuted in Formula One in 2011 and went on to win
    1 Grand Prix.
  • 2011 GP2 series' champion Romain Grosjean debuted in Formula One in 2009 and returned this year with Lotus. He scored 3 podiums since.
  • 2012 GP2 series' champion Davide Valsecchi has tested a HRT in 2010, but has not yet debuted in Formula One.
Formula Renault 3.5
  • 2005 FR3.5 champion Robert Kubica debuted in Formula One in 2006 and went on to win 1 Grand Prix.
  • 2006 FR3.5 champion Alx Danielsson has not debuted in Formula One and has moved to touring cars since.
  • 2007 FR3.5 champion Álvaro Parente has not debuted in Formula One and has moved to touring cars since.
  • 2008 FR3.5 champion Giedo van der Garde has not debuted in Formula One, but is test driver for Caterham.
  • 2009 FR3.5 champion Bertrand Baguette has not debuted in Formula One and has moved to Indycar and Le Mans since.
  • 2010 FR3.5 champion Mikhail Aleshin has not debuted in Formula One but stayed in FR3.5.
  • 2011 FR3.5 champion Robert Wickens has not debuted in Formula One and has moved to DTM since.
  • 2012 FR3.5 champion Robin Frijns has been signed as test driver for Sauber in 2013.
Formula 2 (revived)
  • 2009 FIA Formula 2 champion Andy Soucek did some Formula One tests but now drives Endurance Races.
  • 2010 FIA Formula 2 champion Dean Stoneman earned a young driver test with Williams before having to put his racing to a halt because of cancer.
  • 2011 FIA Formula 2 champion Mirko Bortolotti earned a young driver test with Williams and has disappeared off the radar since.
  • 2012 FIA Formula 2 champion Luciano Bacheta tested for Williams on Silverstone on October 19th. No word yet on his future.
Conclusion
Of the 58 'feeder series champions' listed here, only 15 went on to win a Grand Prix, only 8 won more than one Grand Prix and Lewis Hamilton is the only one who actually became a champion in Formula One.

Of all the 32 Formula One champions, only Denny Hulme (1967), Jochen Rindt (1970), Keke Rosberg (1982) and Damon Hill (1996) spent more than one season in a feeder series, and of those, only Hulme and Rindt really impressed there.

Making this list, it was interesting to see that of all the current world champions, only Fernando Alonso and Lewis Hamilton have spent a full season in a direct feeder series. Michael Schumacher, Jenson Button and Kimi Räikkönen were picked up after the junior series, while Sebastian Vettel earned his first test based on his Formula BMW results and was only half-way through his WSR season before Formula One called him. Even looking at the big names of back when, most champions were picked up by a Formula one team after impressive results in Formula 3.

The career path to Formula One, more so success in Formula One, is very short and very shallow. It is sometimes lamented that Formula One is only for the rich kids, but aside from champions present and past showing otherwise, it seems the biggest talents will make it before the need for the big money (in the feeder series) kicks in. Might we have lost out on some talents because of the monetary requirements of auto racing? I'm sure we have, but the biggest talents have always found a way to impress very early on in their career.

note: I had already started writing this before SpaceHorseParty posted his thread and I thought it'd be a shame to let it slide because of that.

Advertisement

#2 scheivlak

scheivlak
  • Member

  • 11,479 posts
  • Joined: August 01

Posted 30 December 2012 - 17:02

[*]1968 European Formula 2 champion Jean-Pierre Beltoise debuted in Formula One in 1966

Not true - he made his F1 debut in 1967.
Yes, he participated in the 1966 German GP (like e.g. Jacky Ickx BTW), but in the F2 race with an F2 car that was not conforming to F1 regulations.

[*]1972 European Formula 2 champion Mike Hailwood debuted in Formula One in 1967 and finished second in 1 Grand Prix'.

Mike already made his F1 debut in the 1963 British GP.
He came quite close BTW to winning a F1 GP (Italy 1971) a year before he became F2 champion!

#3 eric2610

eric2610
  • Member

  • 62 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 30 December 2012 - 17:03

Thats some impressive Work, thanks...

#4 sopa

sopa
  • Member

  • 2,930 posts
  • Joined: April 07

Posted 30 December 2012 - 19:42

Of all the 32 Formula One champions, only Denny Hulme (1967), Jochen Rindt (1970), Keke Rosberg (1982) and Damon Hill (1996) spent more than one season in a feeder series, and of those, only Hulme and Rindt really impressed there.


Very interesting statistic. Based on that only Frijns can be expected to become a future WDC. Spent a season in feeder series (WSR), but has already been picked up by Sauber F1.

Ok, Jean-Eric Vergne has hope as well.:p He spent one year in WSR before moving up to F1.

Hulkenberg should have hope too - spent one year in GP2, though spent two years on F3 level.

I don't know about Bottas. Sure he was picked up before reaching GP2, but spent ages on F3/GP3 level.

Who else then? Looks like already too late for Nasr or Calado to become F1 WDC's! Maybe Daniel Abt or Mitch Evans can stun enough next year to get picked up directly into F1.:p

#5 mnmracer

mnmracer
  • Member

  • 1,972 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 30 December 2012 - 20:05

I don't know about Bottas. Sure he was picked up before reaching GP2, but spent ages on F3/GP3 level.

That's one of the things which make me wonder about Valsechi; it's been 6 years since he debuted in World Series by Renault.

#6 np93

np93
  • Member

  • 85 posts
  • Joined: October 12

Posted 30 December 2012 - 20:41

Sebastian Vettel spent 2 complete years in European F3 (2005,2006) as did Lewis Hamilton (2004, 2005)

#7 mnmracer

mnmracer
  • Member

  • 1,972 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 30 December 2012 - 20:44

Sebastian Vettel spent 2 complete years in European F3 (2005,2006) as did Lewis Hamilton (2004, 2005)

Formula 3 is a junior formula in this case, not a feeder series.
Almost everyone has spent multiple years in Formula 3. This is about that step up, just below F1.

The idea was always that the career path was: Formula Ford/Renault - F3 - F2/F3000 - F1.
It's interesting to see that this last step is often skipped among the champions of Formula One.

#8 np93

np93
  • Member

  • 85 posts
  • Joined: October 12

Posted 30 December 2012 - 20:49

Ah right, missed that..... I think the last driver to get up to F1 by starting in FFord was Mark Webber, so it's been sad to see the decline of what was once THE first step on the racing ladder, maybe the slicks and wings car can remedy that

#9 Clatter

Clatter
  • Member

  • 27,312 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 30 December 2012 - 20:54

Ah right, missed that..... I think the last driver to get up to F1 by starting in FFord was Mark Webber, so it's been sad to see the decline of what was once THE first step on the racing ladder, maybe the slicks and wings car can remedy that


I think some of that decline in the first step is because the that step used to be a testing role for a season or 2 rather than jumping into a race seat. Test driver now is not what it was and I'm surprised teams still bother with the role at all.

#10 Kingshark

Kingshark
  • Member

  • 2,944 posts
  • Joined: April 12

Posted 30 December 2012 - 20:57

If only my parents had bought me a go-kart when I was 5 years old. I'd be winning everything in lower formula leagues right now. :p

Nonetheless. I personally believe this would be an "ideal" path to Formula 1, if there is such a thing.

1.) Start go-karting when you are 5 years old. Win everything.
2.) When 16, join Formula BMW, Formula Ford or some other low level entrance series. Win.
3.) Join Formula 3 when you are 18. Win it.
4.) Penultimate step, enter GP2 or F3.5R when about 19 or 20. Win that.
5.) By the time you're 21 you should get a drive or at least test ride in F1.

#11 V8 Fireworks

V8 Fireworks
  • Member

  • 5,464 posts
  • Joined: June 06

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:06

Ah right, missed that..... I think the last driver to get up to F1 by starting in FFord was Mark Webber, so it's been sad to see the decline of what was once THE first step on the racing ladder, maybe the slicks and wings car can remedy that

Surely Formula Ford is still a "better" race car than Formula Renault. More educational with the simpler construction (certainly the choice to build or modify your own car if you want), no downforce and the slipstreaming etc.

Formula Renault is just more popular (in Europe), especially with the perceived benefits of one-make formula I think.

Formula Ford is still the top junior series in Australia, as there is no Formula Renault series, and the Fords are quite expensive they say. Of course Ricciardo (or Courtney or Briscoe... or indeed Rob Nguyen, remember him: straight from race school to international F3000! :eek: a race driver with Vietnamese heritage would have a been a relative coup for F1, maybe he was poorly advised and would have done better to spend his money on Formula Renault/3 experience first... ) didn't race there, anyway. :rolleyes:

Edited by V8 Fireworks, 31 December 2012 - 04:10.


#12 V8 Fireworks

V8 Fireworks
  • Member

  • 5,464 posts
  • Joined: June 06

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:12

Nonetheless. I personally believe this would be an "ideal" path to Formula 1, if there is such a thing.

You are assuming a degree of competence, determination and natural ability of course. :)

Seems like a walk in a park compared to swimming though.

All 8 year-olds need to swim for 2 hours at 5am, 6 times a week, in order to eventually select the top 0.001% to go the olympics 8 years later. It's a very "interesing" system. :\ I suppose there is a reason why the "lesser talents" need to train equally hard to the future champions , but it is a bit lost on me to be honest.

Edited by V8 Fireworks, 31 December 2012 - 04:14.


#13 Kingshark

Kingshark
  • Member

  • 2,944 posts
  • Joined: April 12

Posted 31 December 2012 - 05:07

Seems like a walk in a park compared to swimming though.

Not financially though!

#14 pingu666

pingu666
  • Member

  • 8,739 posts
  • Joined: October 07

Posted 31 December 2012 - 05:17

f3 is still big money for the average person

junior formula are run for the teams much more than the drivers (follow the money ;) )

be interesting to see a comparison with american nascar ish system, kyle larson? had done 140~races in a year in all sorts of different cars and races, very different from the europeon style.

#15 TheUltimateWorrier

TheUltimateWorrier
  • Member

  • 836 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 28 February 2013 - 20:18

Very interesting statistic. Based on that only Frijns can be expected to become a future WDC. Spent a season in feeder series (WSR), but has already been picked up by Sauber F1.
. . .
Who else then? Looks like already too late for Nasr or Calado to become F1 WDC's! Maybe Daniel Abt or Mitch Evans can stun enough next year to get picked up directly into F1.:p

Interesting what happens in two months. If Frijns joins the GP2 series, you can add him to the list with Calado and Nasr ;) .

#16 Burtros

Burtros
  • Member

  • 1,017 posts
  • Joined: July 11

Posted 28 February 2013 - 20:41

Thats some great research. A quick wikipedia skip through of F3000 top three finishers doesnt add much more to the list of winners - Irvine, Barrichello and Coulthard that I found. De Ferran, Zanardi and Brack enjoyed success in the states.

It adds weight to the idea that the 'greats' of F1 have normally skipped that level.

#17 Juan Kerr

Juan Kerr
  • Member

  • 2,625 posts
  • Joined: October 05

Posted 28 February 2013 - 20:52

So international F3000 was a bit of a curse then by the looks of it, only a few F1 wins have come out of that, hardly many at all.

#18 scheivlak

scheivlak
  • Member

  • 11,479 posts
  • Joined: August 01

Posted 28 February 2013 - 21:04

Thats some great research. A quick wikipedia skip through of F3000 top three finishers doesnt add much more to the list of winners - Irvine, Barrichello and Coulthard that I found. De Ferran, Zanardi and Brack enjoyed success in the states.

It adds weight to the idea that the 'greats' of F1 have normally skipped that level.

Well, Alonso and Montoya didn't and they became reasonably succesful.

Edited by scheivlak, 28 February 2013 - 21:07.


#19 Juan Kerr

Juan Kerr
  • Member

  • 2,625 posts
  • Joined: October 05

Posted 28 February 2013 - 21:11

Well, Alonso and Montoya didn't and they became reasonably succesfull.

Count the F1 wins in the winner of 20 years of F3000 and count the F1 wins out of all the participants of F3000 in those 20 years and it's shocking.

Advertisement

#20 Rob

Rob
  • Member

  • 8,183 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 28 February 2013 - 23:11

Count the F1 wins in the winner of 20 years of F3000 and count the F1 wins out of all the participants of F3000 in those 20 years and it's shocking.

So many of those drivers ended up in absolutely diabolical F1 teams, if they even got that far. Lots of promising drivers couldn't even find a budget to do F1 with any team.

Edited by Rob, 28 February 2013 - 23:12.


#21 Zippel

Zippel
  • Member

  • 1,031 posts
  • Joined: December 07

Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:00

So international F3000 was a bit of a curse then by the looks of it, only a few F1 wins have come out of that, hardly many at all.


I kept reading years ago that the F3000 cars required a different style of driving to the F1 cars and there were more similarities between F3 and F1 cars hence many of the more successful F1 drivers didn't bother with F3000 or didn't stay in it too long. Explains why they eventually changed the series to GP2.

Edited by Zippel, 01 March 2013 - 01:00.


#22 Thisaintlyricism

Thisaintlyricism
  • New Member

  • 13 posts
  • Joined: November 12

Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:30

Looks like Ecclestone has picked a favourite (junior driver, not feeder series):
http://www.cityam.co...ger-season-2014

Ecclestone also says he is willing on former champion Damon Hill’s son Josh to follow in his father’s footsteps and becomes the first ever third generation F1 driver.

Josh Hill will this year compete in the Formula Three European championship, a junior series two steps below F1.

The winner gets a test drive with Ferrari’s F1 team so victory would put him one step closer to repeating history. “I wish Damon’s son would get into F1. It would be super. It would be fantastic,” Ecclestone said.

With some new drivers being signed up to F1 because they bring the teams big pay cheques from their backers, Ecclestone hopes the future will be more meritocratic.

“Last year we had a year where it was a bit difficult to sort out the wheat from the chaff, so maybe this year we will see a bit more of the guys you thought were going to be good,” he said.


#23 klyster

klyster
  • Member

  • 4,321 posts
  • Joined: October 08

Posted 05 March 2013 - 04:34

1992 International Formula 3000 champion Luca Badoer debuted in Formula One in 1993 and went on to went on to become a failure test driver for Ferrari in Formula One.


:lol: Poor Luca....

#24 Rob

Rob
  • Member

  • 8,183 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 05 March 2013 - 10:56

[*]1992 International Formula 3000 champion Luca Badoer debuted in Formula One in 1993 and went on to went on to become a faillure test driver for Ferrari in Formula One.

I didn't spot this before, but if you're going to slag someone off and call them a failure, at least make sure you're coherent.

#25 mnmracer

mnmracer
  • Member

  • 1,972 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:25

Umm... wow
I really did not notice that.

#26 prty

prty
  • Member

  • 5,161 posts
  • Joined: April 05

Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:53

I kept reading years ago that the F3000 cars required a different style of driving to the F1 cars and there were more similarities between F3 and F1 cars hence many of the more successful F1 drivers didn't bother with F3000 or didn't stay in it too long. Explains why they eventually changed the series to GP2.


Alonso said that driving the f3000 was like driving a touring car with the shape of a single seater.