Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Restoring old cars


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 4,476 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 13 February 2013 - 22:44

A young boy is watching in fascination as his father restore his pet project, an MG.
The young boy says Dad, when I grow up I want to restore old cars too.
The Dad looks up with busted knuckles and covered in grease and oil and says
"Son, you can't do both"

http://dilbert.com/s...mic/2013-02-11/

Advertisement

#2 Magoo

Magoo
  • Member

  • 2,433 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 13 February 2013 - 23:05

On a restorer's board I frequent, people took great offense to that Scott Adams cartoon. I don't know why but they embraced the whole politics of grievance thing, as if they were victims of racism or something. Most curious.

#3 pugfan

pugfan
  • Member

  • 174 posts
  • Joined: August 09

Posted 13 February 2013 - 23:42

On a restorer's board I frequent, people took great offense to that Scott Adams cartoon. I don't know why but they embraced the whole politics of grievance thing, as if they were victims of racism or something. Most curious.


If you take a hobby too seriously, is it still fun?

I'm tragically (according to my wife) into cars but it's like any other group of enthusiasts. People who are into thing x often define themselves by what subgroup of thing x they're definitely not into.

Cyclists is a very good example. I ride more than 150kms per week but because I don't wear Lycra, I must obviously not be very good according to the Lycra wearers who consistently pull in front of me at the lights without even considering that they might cause offence. At the other end of the spectrum, I don't ride a Fixed wheel so I'm very uncool according to the Hipsters.

I find hardcore enthusiasts slightly odd.

#4 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 14 February 2013 - 00:04

Perhaps enthusiasts are only odd if they are more enthusiastic than we are.

#5 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 4,476 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 14 February 2013 - 00:12

I thought Wally's line was hilarious.

#6 gruntguru

gruntguru
  • Member

  • 5,170 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 14 February 2013 - 00:51

Aint nothing funnier than the truth.

#7 Canuck

Canuck
  • Member

  • 1,636 posts
  • Joined: March 05

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:48

If you take a hobby too seriously, is it still fun?

I'm tragically (according to my wife) into cars but it's like any other group of enthusiasts. People who are into thing x often define themselves by what subgroup of thing x they're definitely not into.

Cyclists is a very good example. I ride more than 150kms per week but because I don't wear Lycra, I must obviously not be very good according to the Lycra wearers who consistently pull in front of me at the lights without even considering that they might cause offence. At the other end of the spectrum, I don't ride a Fixed wheel so I'm very uncool according to the Hipsters.

I find hardcore enthusiasts slightly odd.

I'm firmly in the fredly-Lycra crowd, even as a commuter. I stumbled into it though - both riding and stretchy pants. After the cold weather forced me out of cargo-shorts with a chamois liner, I wore full-length stretchy pants. The difference was amazing - no annoying flapping, no cuffs hitting the top tube. I decided to try the full-on shorts once summer arrived and I've not looked back since. Pretty sure the old cargo shorts weren't the speed-limiting factor but the Lycra is infinitely more comfortable, especially on long rides.

I never under-estimate the guy (or girl) in front of me - I like a good bit of SCR chase.

#8 Catalina Park

Catalina Park
  • Member

  • 5,668 posts
  • Joined: July 01

Posted 14 February 2013 - 10:04

I thought Wally's line was hilarious.

Yep, I thought it was a cracker.

#9 Lee Nicolle

Lee Nicolle
  • Member

  • 5,641 posts
  • Joined: July 08

Posted 14 February 2013 - 21:18

Restoring old cars. A bottomless pit that is never finished. And my cars are not even that old as they are late 60s and early 70s!!

#10 bigleagueslider

bigleagueslider
  • Member

  • 837 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 15 February 2013 - 04:18

I recall a few years back there was a wonderful show on a US cable network produced in the UK, and it consisted of a series of about 12 30-minute episodes showing the detailed process of restoring a car or building a kit-plane, etc. One of the best series involved a ground-up restoration of a convertible E-type Jag. The finished car was absolutely beautiful. But at the end of the final episode, the host gave an honest accounting of what the project cost. It was almost $100K, and the restored car was only worth about $50K at best.

#11 Lee Nicolle

Lee Nicolle
  • Member

  • 5,641 posts
  • Joined: July 08

Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:46

I recall a few years back there was a wonderful show on a US cable network produced in the UK, and it consisted of a series of about 12 30-minute episodes showing the detailed process of restoring a car or building a kit-plane, etc. One of the best series involved a ground-up restoration of a convertible E-type Jag. The finished car was absolutely beautiful. But at the end of the final episode, the host gave an honest accounting of what the project cost. It was almost $100K, and the restored car was only worth about $50K at best.

I read an article in the distant past, an English car buyer. He wanted a new Morris Minor, only recently out of production. About 1970? Anyway the gentleman commissioned a new Minor built from Spare Parts. It cost a very lot more than what they were last selling for. Though WHY is another question.

#12 MatsNorway

MatsNorway
  • Member

  • 2,025 posts
  • Joined: December 09

Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:53

It makes you wonder what it would cost to fix up your zakspeed racing car..

To me this looks like bad business but it all depends on the price.
http://www.speedhunt...ng-on-the-past/



#13 byrkus

byrkus
  • Member

  • 786 posts
  • Joined: October 01

Posted 21 February 2013 - 15:50

I read an article in the distant past, an English car buyer. He wanted a new Morris Minor, only recently out of production. About 1970? Anyway the gentleman commissioned a new Minor built from Spare Parts. It cost a very lot more than what they were last selling for. Though WHY is another question.


Perhaps he wanted to own the very last one made...? :)


#14 Fat Boy

Fat Boy
  • Member

  • 1,836 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 21 February 2013 - 18:25

Cyclists is a very good example. I ride more than 150kms per week but because I don't wear Lycra, I must obviously not be very good according to the Lycra wearers who consistently pull in front of me at the lights without even considering that they might cause offense.


It's not that we don't consider it. It's that we don't care. <j/k>

#15 Magoo

Magoo
  • Member

  • 2,433 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 21 February 2013 - 20:06

I recall a few years back there was a wonderful show on a US cable network produced in the UK, and it consisted of a series of about 12 30-minute episodes showing the detailed process of restoring a car or building a kit-plane, etc. One of the best series involved a ground-up restoration of a convertible E-type Jag. The finished car was absolutely beautiful. But at the end of the final episode, the host gave an honest accounting of what the project cost. It was almost $100K, and the restored car was only worth about $50K at best.


The numbers move around, but that is not at all unusual with cars in the +/- $100,000-$300,000 range: it costs more to restore the car to 100-point condition than it will ever be worth when it's done.

People do it anyway because they want a specific car restored for sentimental reasons, or they want a certain color/upholstery/option combination, or they want a car done to some extreme level of finish, like when they are gunning for a major concours award. Then when they are done having their fun with the car, they get what they can for it at auction and move on to the next project. It's their cost of hobby. Sounds expensive but it's still a lot cheaper than operating a boat or an airplane.

All this said, there are guys in the biz who turn cars for a profit, but they have their own restoration facilities/do their own work to reduce overhead, and they need to really know the market, buying and selling with care. They have to be sharp mechanically and sharp with a dollar, too. It's much like racing in that regard: there are people making money at it, but they're good.

#16 Canuck

Canuck
  • Member

  • 1,636 posts
  • Joined: March 05

Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:27

People do it anyway because they want a specific car restored for sentimental reasons,

I once worked on a Lincoln coupe thing like that. Late 70's or early 80's vintage with the 30-foot long hood. Mark III maybe...the specific escapes me. Anyway, it belonged to the wife of a late wealthy rancher and she brought it to us 25-odd years old and looking like it. We poked around it a bit and suggested that it wasn't worth restoring - costs far in excess of it's value or even a new one. She left and took the car with her but came back a few weeks later after test-driving the offerings of the day. She didn't care for new cars, didn't like the way they drove and besides, her late husband had bought her this car new. So - off we went. She could easily have bought a new Lincoln for what it cost but she didn't care one iota - she wanted that car.



#17 Kelpiecross

Kelpiecross
  • Member

  • 830 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:25

I recall a few years back there was a wonderful show on a US cable network produced in the UK, and it consisted of a series of about 12 30-minute episodes showing the detailed process of restoring a car or building a kit-plane, etc. One of the best series involved a ground-up restoration of a convertible E-type Jag. The finished car was absolutely beautiful. But at the end of the final episode, the host gave an honest accounting of what the project cost. It was almost $100K, and the restored car was only worth about $50K at best.


This series of shows was also one of my favourites. The show was by Mark Evans - "A Car Is Reborn". From memory I think he gave the figure of 75,000 pounds for restoring the Jag. I think (I could be wrong) that he explained at the end that his no-expense-spared approach to restoration was not really possible in the real world - only possible if the TV production company was paying for it . I imagine that 75,000 pounds is actually one of the lesser expenses of the whole production - when compared to the production crew's wages etc.

I liked all his shows - but his build-it-yourself helicopter made me a bit uncomfortable - I think its complexity would be too much even for a fairly skilled amateur builder.



#18 Grumbles

Grumbles
  • Member

  • 326 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 23 February 2013 - 00:15

It's not that we don't consider it. It's that we don't care. <j/k>

Posted Image

#19 Lee Nicolle

Lee Nicolle
  • Member

  • 5,641 posts
  • Joined: July 08

Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:34

Posted Image

That should be published in every newspaper in the world. Then maybe cyclists would realise they actually do not own the world!! That and their hero Lance, and all his other druggy TDF mates!!

Advertisement

#20 Lee Nicolle

Lee Nicolle
  • Member

  • 5,641 posts
  • Joined: July 08

Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:39

I once worked on a Lincoln coupe thing like that. Late 70's or early 80's vintage with the 30-foot long hood. Mark III maybe...the specific escapes me. Anyway, it belonged to the wife of a late wealthy rancher and she brought it to us 25-odd years old and looking like it. We poked around it a bit and suggested that it wasn't worth restoring - costs far in excess of it's value or even a new one. She left and took the car with her but came back a few weeks later after test-driving the offerings of the day. She didn't care for new cars, didn't like the way they drove and besides, her late husband had bought her this car new. So - off we went. She could easily have bought a new Lincoln for what it cost but she didn't care one iota - she wanted that car.

I will have you know they are only 6 foot long. And that class of car is the ideal ladies car. My down class 4 door LTD brother of the Lincoln was a 5 foot tall ladies shopping trolley when new. Except when her husband towed 5000s with it!

#21 Kelpiecross

Kelpiecross
  • Member

  • 830 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 23 February 2013 - 13:18


How to make a small fortune? Start with a big fortune and restore an old Jag (hasn't stopped me attempting such a thing though).


#22 Canuck

Canuck
  • Member

  • 1,636 posts
  • Joined: March 05

Posted 24 February 2013 - 00:28

I will have you know they are only 6 foot long.

I don't know...I'm pretty sure you could portage a king size mattress on it and still have hood showing. :D

#23 Fat Boy

Fat Boy
  • Member

  • 1,836 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 24 February 2013 - 03:33

That should be published in every newspaper in the world. Then maybe cyclists would realise they actually do not own the world!! That and their hero Lance, and all his other druggy TDF mates!!


The amount of stupidity in this post is truly a joy to behold.

#24 gruntguru

gruntguru
  • Member

  • 5,170 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:06

:up:

If only he wasn't serious.

I can feel a new thread coming on.

#25 Canuck

Canuck
  • Member

  • 1,636 posts
  • Joined: March 05

Posted 24 February 2013 - 16:59

Didn't you know? When you buy a bicycle, you also get a deed to the world. It is ours. It also comes with a Lance fan club membership and a bag of Amgen's finest EPO. Everyone who rides a bike is required to sign an oath of allegiance to doping and pro-cycling along with a promise to do everything in our power to take out cars in a steady barrage of car/cyclist accidents because we're all aware of how easily the paint gets scratched when you mow down a rider who had the temerity to ride their bicycle on the road. We will scratch your paint and dent your chin spoilers! This is war!

#26 Grumbles

Grumbles
  • Member

  • 326 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 25 February 2013 - 01:14

...We will scratch your paint and dent your chin spoilers!


I can tolerate that. I just can't stand the stench of all that Lycra burning on the catalytic converter.....


#27 Fat Boy

Fat Boy
  • Member

  • 1,836 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 25 February 2013 - 04:33

I can feel a new thread coming on.


I'd be more prone to chiming in on a new HP/Torque thread.

#28 Kelpiecross

Kelpiecross
  • Member

  • 830 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:55

I'd be more prone to chiming in on a new HP/Torque thread.


Only torque matters - you would have to a be a complete idiot to think otherwise.

#29 kikiturbo2

kikiturbo2
  • Member

  • 627 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:09

Only torque matters - you would have to a be a complete idiot to think otherwise.


not if you have a true seamless gearbox...

#30 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:33

..which, of course, is impossible.

#31 Pat Clarke

Pat Clarke
  • Member

  • 2,001 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 25 February 2013 - 14:33

..which, of course, is impossible.


Ah Tony, but you can have seamless lycra ;-)

Pat

#32 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 25 February 2013 - 16:50

I wear nothing else, Pat, from wrist to ankle, but I wouldn't want the World to know...

#33 Patrick Morgan

Patrick Morgan
  • Member

  • 208 posts
  • Joined: June 09

Posted 26 February 2013 - 11:21

This appears to me to be a great opportunity for a selfless plug (something I normally try to avoid at all costs). For those interested in the restoration process we have just launched this add on to our website. It's mainly for the use of our customers, keeping them informed on progress, logging engine mileage etc. but we've made some of our in-house projects viewable to the public. One of our customers has very kindly allowed us to have a limited amount of his Mercedes DTM profile public.

https://customers.dt...manceltd.co.uk/

Hope you find it interesting.

Edited by Patrick Morgan, 26 February 2013 - 11:22.


#34 Magoo

Magoo
  • Member

  • 2,433 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:35

This appears to me to be a great opportunity for a selfless plug (something I normally try to avoid at all costs). For those interested in the restoration process we have just launched this add on to our website. It's mainly for the use of our customers, keeping them informed on progress, logging engine mileage etc. but we've made some of our in-house projects viewable to the public. One of our customers has very kindly allowed us to have a limited amount of his Mercedes DTM profile public.

https://customers.dt...manceltd.co.uk/

Hope you find it interesting.



Good stuff. :up:


#35 Fat Boy

Fat Boy
  • Member

  • 1,836 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 26 February 2013 - 17:22

I wear nothing else, Pat, from wrist to ankle, but I wouldn't want the World to know...



Posted Image

Edited by Fat Boy, 26 February 2013 - 17:24.


#36 Fat Boy

Fat Boy
  • Member

  • 1,836 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 26 February 2013 - 17:27

http://velonews.comp...incident_275694


That should be published in every newspaper in the world.


Agreed.


#37 h4887

h4887
  • Member

  • 875 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 27 February 2013 - 20:43

You'd have thought he could have done better than that with an SUV... :cool:

#38 GreenMachine

GreenMachine
  • Member

  • 757 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:50

You'd have thought he could have done better than that with an SUV... :cool:


Au contraire, that is about typical :rolleyes:


:lol:



#39 Bloggsworth

Bloggsworth
  • Member

  • 7,432 posts
  • Joined: April 07

Posted 27 March 2013 - 23:16

I'm 68 and have no intention of growing up...